Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Alaskan oil spill: health risks uncovered.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4160
Source
Science. 1989 Aug 4;245(4917):463
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-4-1989

The otter (Lutra lutra) in Sweden--population trends in relation to sigma DDT and total PCB concentrations during 1968-99.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75552
Source
Environ Pollut. 2001;111(3):457-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Roos
E. Greyerz
M. Olsson
F. Sandegren
Author Affiliation
Contaminant Research Group, Swedish Museum of Natural History, PO Box 50007, SE-104 05 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2001;111(3):457-69
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cause of Death
DDT - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Fishes
Food Contamination
Mortality - trends
Otters - growth & development
Pesticides - analysis - poisoning
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Population Dynamics
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) has been suggested as the major cause of the European otter (Lutra lutra) population decline. This study investigates temporal and geographical changes in otter numbers as well as total PCB and sigma DDT concentrations in otters and their food in different parts of Sweden with various pollution impacts during three decades. In Sweden, rare species belong to the State and carcasses of such specimens are sent to the authorities. Two-hundred and eight specimens have been used to investigate temporal and spatial variation in the otter populations during 1968 and 1999. One-hundred and twenty-five of them have been chemically analysed. The population trends in northern Sweden coincide with the temporal trends of the contaminants. When concentrations of PCBs decrease in the environment, otter population increases. Neither aldrin/dieldrin nor mercury pollution seem to explain why the Swedish otter populations decreased dramatically during the 1960s-1980s. In southern Sweden total PCB concentrations are still high and the indications of improvement of the population are weak.
Notes
Erratum In: Environ Pollut 2001;112(3):521
PubMed ID
11202751 View in PubMed
Less detail