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Malignant seminoma with metastasis and herpesvirus infection in a free-living sea otter (Enhydra lutris).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4011
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 1998 Mar;29(1):35-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
D C Reimer
T P Lipscomb
Author Affiliation
Registry of Comparative Pathology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C. 20306-6001, USA.
Source
J Zoo Wildl Med. 1998 Mar;29(1):35-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cornea - ultrastructure - virology
Cryptorchidism - complications - veterinary
Epithelium - pathology - ultrastructure - virology
Esophagus - pathology - ultrastructure - virology
Herpesviridae - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Herpesviridae Infections - complications - pathology - veterinary
Inclusion Bodies, Viral - ultrastructure - virology
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Lymphatic Metastasis
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Mouth Mucosa - pathology - ultrastructure - virology
Otters
Seminoma - complications - pathology - veterinary
Testicular Neoplasms - complications - pathology - veterinary
Testis - pathology
Virion - isolation & purification - ultrastructure
Abstract
In winter 1990, an adult male sea otter (Enhydra lutris) was found dead along the eastern shore of Prince William Sound, Alaska. Necropsy findings included an enlarged retained left testicle with a twisted spermatic cord, enlarged left sublumbar lymph node, emaciation, dental attrition, oral papules and ulcers, and luminal intestinal hemorrhage associated with numerous acanthocephalids. A malignant seminoma was present in the left testicle and left sublumbar lymph node. Additionally, herpesvirus like intranuclear inclusion bodies were found in oral, esophageal, and corneal epithelial cells. Virions consistent with a herpesvirus were found in esophageal epithelium. Dental attrition, severe intestinal acanthocephaliasis, the malignant seminoma, and emaciation were considered contributing factors in causing death. The herpesviral disease was probably secondary to the debilitation and stress. This is the first report of malignant seminoma with metastasis in a sea otter.
PubMed ID
9638623 View in PubMed
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