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Cryptosporidium and Giardia in marine-foraging river otters (Lontra canadensis) from the Puget Sound Georgia Basin ecosystem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164131
Source
J Parasitol. 2007 Feb;93(1):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
J K Gaydos
W A Miller
K V K Gilardi
A. Melli
H. Schwantje
C. Engelstoft
H. Fritz
P A Conrad
Author Affiliation
Orcas Island Office, University of California-Davis Wildlife Health Center, 1016 Deer Harbor Road, Eastsound, Washington 98245, USA. jkgaydos@ucdavis.edu
Source
J Parasitol. 2007 Feb;93(1):198-202
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Cryptosporidium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Ecosystem
Feces - parasitology
Genotype
Giardia - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Giardiasis - epidemiology - transmission - veterinary
Humans
Otters - parasitology
Risk factors
Washington - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
Species of Cryptosporidium and Giardia can infect humans and wildlife and have the potential to be transmitted between these 2 groups; yet, very little is known about these protozoans in marine wildlife. Feces of river otters (Lontra canadensis), a common marine wildlife species in the Puget Sound Georgia Basin, were examined for species of Cryptosporidium and Giardia to determine their role in the epidemiology of these pathogens. Using ZnSO4 flotation and immunomagnetic separation, followed by direct immunofluorescent antibody detection (IMS/DFA), we identified Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts in 9 fecal samples from 6 locations and Giardia sp. cysts in 11 fecal samples from 7 locations. The putative risk factors of proximate human population and degree of anthropogenic shoreline modification were not associated with the detection of Cryptosporidium or Giardia spp. in river otter feces. Amplification of DNA from the IMS/DFA slide scrapings was successful for 1 sample containing > 500 Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts. Sequences from the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA and the COWP loci were most similar to the ferret Cryptosporidium sp. genotype. River otters could serve as reservoirs for Cryptosporidium and Giardia species in marine ecosystems. More work is needed to better understand the zoonotic potential of the genotypes they carry as well as their implications for river otter health.
PubMed ID
17436965 View in PubMed
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STREPTOCOCCUS PHOCAE IN MARINE MAMMALS OF NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC AND ARCTIC CANADA: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS OF 85 POSTMORTEM INVESTIGATIONS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295313
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):101-111
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2018
Author
Nicole D Taurisano
Brian P Butler
Diana Stone
Harry Hariharan
Paul J Fields
Hugh W Ferguson
Martin Haulena
Paul Cotrell
Ole Nielsen
Stephen Raverty
Author Affiliation
1 ? Department of Pathobiology, St. George's University, School of Veterinary Medicine, True Blue, St. George, Grenada, West Indies.
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2018 01; 54(1):101-111
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Canada
Female
Male
Otters - microbiology
Phocoena - microbiology
Retrospective Studies
Seals, Earless - microbiology
Streptococcus - classification - isolation & purification
Abstract
: Streptococcus phocae is a pathogen of marine mammals, although its pathogenicity remains poorly understood. Recovery of this bacterium from asymptomatic carriers suggests that it is an opportunistic pathogen. We investigated the role of S. phocae in naturally occurring disease and its significance as a pathogen based on postmortem investigations. Between 2007 and 2012, 1,696 whole carcasses, tissue samples, or both were submitted from the northeastern Pacific and Arctic Canada for diagnostic testing. Streptococcus phocae was cultured from phocids ( n=66), otariids ( n=12), harbor porpoises ( Phocoena phocoena; n=5), and sea otters ( Enhydra lutris; n=2). Pathologic manifestations of S. phocae-associated disease included localized, as well as systemic, inflammatory lesions with common findings of suppurative bronchopneumonia ( n=17) and bacteremia ( n=27). Lung lesions were frequently culture-positive for S. phocae, suggesting commensal colonization of the oropharynx with subsequent opportunistic infection of the respiratory tract during tissue injury, coinfection, immunosuppression, or other debilitating conditions. The presence of a positive spleen culture, and interpretations at necropsy and histopathology, were used to determine the presence of S. phocae bacteremia. Less frequent lesions that were culture positive for S. phocae included abscesses ( n=9), meningitis ( n=7), and cellulitis ( n=1). The majority of cases with S. phocae lesions featured pre-existing conditions that presumably contributed to some degree of debilitation or immunosuppression, including emaciation ( n=29), liver mercury accumulation ( n=29), trauma ( n=22), severe pulmonary or cardiovascular nematodiasis ( n=9), concurrent bacterial or viral infections ( n=8), or sarcocystosis ( n=6). These findings suggest that S. phocae could be characterized as an opportunistic pathogen, associated with debilitating conditions in stranded and rehabilitating marine mammals. Wildlife investigators can use these results to draw more definitive conclusions regarding positive S. phocae cultures during postmortem studies in marine mammals.
PubMed ID
28982020 View in PubMed
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