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Bacteriological studies on exudative otitis media occurring in six communities of Alaskan Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2065
Source
Acta Oto-Laryngologica. Supplementum 1970;260:1-36.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1970
Author
Reinhard, K.R.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Acta Oto-Laryngologica. Supplementum 1970;260:1-36.
Date
1970
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Kalskag
Aniak
Otitis media
Otorrhea
Drug sensitivity
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Culture Media
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Exudates and Transudates - microbiology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Otitis Media - microbiology
Proteus - isolation & purification
Staphylococcus - isolation & purification
Virus Cultivation
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2448.
Alaska Medical Library Office. Accession no. 2065
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Chronic ear disease along the coasts of Labrador and northern Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286844
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 5(2):122-129.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
Ratnesar, P.
Author Affiliation
Southeast Thames Regional Health Authority
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 5(2):122-129.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nain
Hopedale
Makkovik
Northwest River
Otitis media
Cholesteatoma
Tympanoplasty
Nursing stations
Tympanosclerosis
Otorrhea
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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Chronic ear disease along the coasts of Labrador and northern Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2020
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1976 Apr;5(2):122-129.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
Ratnesar, P.
Author Affiliation
Southeast Thames Regional Health Authority
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1976 Apr;5(2):122-129.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nain
Hopedale
Makkovik
Northwest River
Cholesteatoma
Tympanoplasty
Nursing stations
Tympanosclerosis
Otorrhea
Cholesteatoma - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Ear Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Newfoundland
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Otosclerosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The high incidence of chronic ear disease among the three ethnic groups, Eskimo, Algonkian Indians, and Caucasians living under the same environmental conditions is studied. The role of socio-economic factors in the incidence and sequelae of ear disease in this population was similar to other studies among the native peoples of Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. The variation in the disease pattern in the different ethnic groups was shown to be related to the aeration of the middle ear cleft. The air cell system of the mastoid is determined by x-rays and/or surgical exploration, but the patency of the Eustachian tube and its size is determined by impedance audiometry and use of ureteric catheters. The clinical and surgical findings of the behavior of chronic ear disease in the different ethnic groups is correlated to tissue culture experiments. The role of lowered oxygen tension in the formation and behavior of cholesteatoma is illustrated well among the Caucasians with poor aeration of the middle ear cleft who show a high incidence of cholesteatoma, unlike the Eskimos with good aeration who show a complete absence of cholesteatoma.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2445.
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Chronic otitis media in the Keewatin area of the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1637
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1990 Dec;19(6):389-390.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
McCullough, D.W.
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1990 Dec;19(6):389-390.
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Epistaxis
Hearing deficiency
Otitis media
Otorrhea
Tympanoplasty
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2439.
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Draining ears and deafness among Alaskan Eskimos

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature382
Source
Archives of Otolarynology. 1965 Jan;81(1):29-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1965
Author
Brody, J.A.
Overfield, T.
McAlister, R.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Archives of Otolarynology. 1965 Jan;81(1):29-33
Date
Jan-1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Audiometry
Hearing deficiency
Otitis media
Otorrhea
St. Paul
Abstract
Middle ear pathology in Alaska is a problem of considerable magnitude. Various studies reported hearing loss in 14% of Caucasians and 34% of Eskimos and evidence of chronic otitis media in about one third of Alaskan Natives. An infant morbidity and mortality study conducted by the Arctic Health Research Center in Eskimo villages revealed that of 323 infants, 38% had at least one episode of draining ears during their first year of life. To combat acute and chronic otitis media, routine medical and surgical treatment is dispensed within the limits of available personnel, and an aggressive tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy campaign is in progress. The present study was undertaken to investigate the natural history and epidemiology of ear disease and also the relationship between hearing loss and otitis media.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2410.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 697.
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Epidemiology of otitis media among Alaskan Eskimo children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2538
Source
Anchorage, AK. Unpaged.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1967/68
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Anchorage, AK. Unpaged.
Date
1967/68
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bethel
Otitis media
Infant mortality
Impetigo
Diarrhea
Meningitis
Otorrhea
Health status
Respiratory diseases
Communicable diseases
Hearing deficiency
Audiometry
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2459.
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Eye, ear, nose and throat infection in Natives of Alaska. Summary and analysis based on report of the survey conducted in 1956

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1065
Source
Northwest Medicine. 1957 Apr;56(4):423-430
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1957
Author
Hayman, C.R.
Kester, F.E.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health
Source
Northwest Medicine. 1957 Apr;56(4):423-430
Date
Apr-1957
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adenoids
Adenotonsillectomy
Audiometry
Corneal scarring
Hearing deficiency
Kwethluk
Mastoiditis
Otitis media
Otorrhea
PKC
Surgery
Tonsils
Tympanic perforation
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2422.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 700.
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Infant morbidity and mortality study. Administrative Report, May.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1618
Source
Unpublished. Arctic Health Research Center, U.S. Public Health Service, Anchorage, AK. 48 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1964
Author
Maynard, J.E.
Hammes, L.M.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Center
Source
Unpublished. Arctic Health Research Center, U.S. Public Health Service, Anchorage, AK. 48 pp.
Date
1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Infant mortality
Infant morbidity
Demography
Vital statistics
Pregnancy
Family size
Obstetrical complications
Preeclampsia
Blood pressure
Iron
Albumin
Childbirth
Birth weight
Prematurity
Infant feeding
Hemoglobin
Immunizations
Otorrhea
Health services
Neonatal mortality
Twin births
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1426.
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Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 1980;51(3-4):173-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
K. Ljunggren
Source
Acta Neurochir (Wien). 1980;51(3-4):173-86
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Brain Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Brain Injuries - complications
Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea - complications - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea - complications - diagnosis - etiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fistula - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Infant
Male
Meningitis - etiology
Middle Aged
Abstract
Data on liquorrhoea in cases collected in 1947-1977 at the Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Lund, Sweden, are analysed with reference to: 1. Time of onset. 2. Symptoms and signs. 3. Diagnostic methods. 4. Treatment-conservative and surgical. 5. Antibiotic prophylaxis. In more than half of the 66 patients the onset of liquorrhoea was delayed more than one month after the head trauma. Antibiotic prophylaxis to all skull base fractures therefore is questioned. False positive reaction with locally applied test strips is noted. Gammacisternography for localization of the leaking area is recommended. If surgery is performed, a high rate of recurrence can be expected if the supposed leaking area is blindly covered.
PubMed ID
6989172 View in PubMed
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Management and outcome of pediatric skull base fractures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141204
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2010 Nov;74(11):1245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Ulla Perheentupa
Ilpo Kinnunen
Reidar Grénman
Kalle Aitasalo
Antti A Mäkitie
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Finland. ulla.perheentupa@utu.fi
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2010 Nov;74(11):1245-50
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Accidental Falls - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Antibiotic Prophylaxis - statistics & numerical data
Blindness - epidemiology
Brain Damage, Chronic - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology
Cerebrospinal Fluid Otorrhea - epidemiology - surgery
Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea - epidemiology - surgery
Child
Child, Preschool
Facial Bones - injuries
Finland - epidemiology
Glasgow Coma Scale
Hearing Loss - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Multiple Trauma - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Retrospective Studies
Skull Base - injuries
Skull Fractures - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Unconsciousness - epidemiology
Abstract
The management of skull base fractures in the pediatric age group continues to be a major challenge even for experienced multidisciplinary teams. This retrospective study was undertaken at a tertiary care academic hospital to evaluate the management and outcome of pediatric skull base fractures.
Retrospective analysis covering a period of 13.5 years (from 1996 to 2009) and 63 patients (mean age 10.7 years; range 1-18 years) was performed.
A road traffic accident was the most frequent etiological factor (38%). The most common skull base fracture type was temporal bone fracture (64%). Longitudinal temporal fractures were observed in 45% and transversal in 23% of these patients; in 10 cases (25%) the fracture was comminuted or mixed type. A fracture involving the spheno-ethmoidal complex was the second most common type of basilar skull fracture (41%) followed by fracture through the orbital bone (35%). Forty-three percent of the patients had a concomitant intracranial injury. Early neurological deficits were diagnosed in 21 patients (33%) and 10 patients (16%) had permanent neurological deficits. One patient died after 1 week of intensive care treatment. Fifty-four patients (86%) were discharged home and 8 patients (13%) were discharged for further rehabilitation. Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or lower correlated with moderate to poor outcome.
We conclude that skull base fracture is a rare injury in childhood. Mortality is uncommon, but this trauma is commonly associated with intracranial injury. Early neurological deficits are caused by traumatic brain injury and were observed in one-third of the patients. However, only less than one-sixth suffered from permanent neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders.
PubMed ID
20800299 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.