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Acute otitis media and its prevention by immunization: a survey of Canadian pediatricians' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135846
Source
Hum Vaccin. 2011 Apr;7(4):429-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Eve Dubé
Vladimir Gilca
Chantal Sauvageau
Richard Bradet
France Lavoie
Nicole Boulianne
François D Boucher
Julie A Bettinger
Shelly McNeil
Ian Gemmill
Author Affiliation
Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Québec, Canada. eve.dube@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Hum Vaccin. 2011 Apr;7(4):429-35
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Professional Competence - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Abstract
Acute otitis media (AOM) is one of the most common bacterial infectious diseases among children and is a leading cause of child healthcare visits and antibiotic prescriptions. Few vaccines have the potential to prevent AOM. The newer pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) offer a larger spectrum of protection against AOM, as well as preventing severe diseases. The main aim of this study was to assess pediatricians' opinions regarding AOM and its prevention by immunization.
Response rate was 50%. Around 60% of respondents estimated that more than 50% of their patients under the age of 3 years would suffer from at least one episode of AOM in the following year. Most respondents (79%) rated consequences of AOM as moderate. Almost all physicians (99%) considered the newer PCV as safe and effective. Most respondents considered their knowledge of the new vaccines was sufficient. More than 90% had a firm intention to recommend newer PCV to their patients. Perceived benefits of AOM prevention by immunization were: reduction of antibiotic administration and reduction of post-AOM complications. More than half of respondents (53%) considered the risk of adverse events as a barrier to AOM prevention by immunization. In multivariate analysis, the main determinant of pediatricians' intention to recommend newer PCV was perceived safety and efficacy of the vaccines (partial R2 = 0.40, p
PubMed ID
21441777 View in PubMed
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Breast-feeding and Infant Hospitalization for Infections: Large Cohort and Sibling Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291144
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2017 Aug; 65(2):225-231
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Ketil Størdal
Karen M Lundeby
Anne L Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Britt Nakstad
Nicolai A Lund-Blix
Lars C Stene
Author Affiliation
*Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo †Paediatric Department, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Grålum ‡Oslo University Hospital, Children's Center, Oslo §Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Nordbyhagen
Department of Pediatric Research, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2017 Aug; 65(2):225-231
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Siblings
Time Factors
Abstract
Breast-feeding may protect against infections, but its optimal duration remains controversial. We aimed to study the association of the duration of full and any breast-feeding with infections the first 18 months of life.
The Norwegian Mother and Child study (MoBa) is a prospective birth cohort which recruited expecting mothers giving birth from 2000 to 2009. We analyzed data from the full cohort (n?=?70,511) and sibling sets (n?=?21,220) with parental report of breast-feeding and infections. The main outcome measures were the relative risks (RRs) for hospitalization for infections from 0 to 18 months by age at introduction of complementary foods and duration of any breast-feeding.
Although we found some evidence for an overall association between longer duration of full breast-feeding and lower risk of hospitalizations for infections, 7.3% of breast-fed children who received complementary foods at 4 to 6 months of age compared to 7.7% of those receiving complementary foods after 6 months were hospitalized (adjusted RR 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.88-1.03). Higher risk of hospitalization was observed in those breast-fed 6 months or less (10.0%) compared to =12 months (7.6%, adjusted RR 1.22, 95% confidence interval 1.14-1.31), but with similar risks for 6 to 11 months versus =12 months. Matched sibling analyses, minimizing the confounding from shared maternal factors, showed nonsignificant associations and were generally weaker compared with the cohort analyses.
Our results support the recommendation to fully breast-feed for 4 months and to continue breast-feeding beyond 6 months, and suggest that protection against infections is limited to the first 12 months.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28737571 View in PubMed
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Chronic otitis media in the Keewatin area of the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1637
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1990 Dec;19(6):389-390.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
McCullough, D.W.
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1990 Dec;19(6):389-390.
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Epistaxis
Hearing deficiency
Otitis media
Otorrhea
Tympanoplasty
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2439.
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Decreased Acute Otitis Media With Treatment Failure After Introduction of the Ten-valent Pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae Protein D Conjugate Vaccine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297940
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 04; 37(4):361-366
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Elias Eythorsson
Birgir Hrafnkelsson
Helga Erlendsdóttir
Sigmar Atli Gudmundsson
Karl G Kristinsson
Ásgeir Haraldsson
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2018 04; 37(4):361-366
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Proteins - immunology
Carrier Proteins - immunology
Ceftriaxone - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Haemophilus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin D - immunology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lipoproteins - immunology
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pneumococcal Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Acute otitis media (AOM) nonresponsive to antibiotics is most commonly caused by antibiotic-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. A strategy for treating these infections with parenteral ceftriaxone was adopted at the Children's Hospital Iceland. The 10-valent pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D-conjugate vaccine was introduced into the vaccination program in Iceland in 2011. The aim was to study its effect on the incidence of AOM with treatment failure.
This retrospective observational study included children who visited the Children's Hospital Iceland because of AOM or received ceftriaxone, regardless of indication from 2008-2015. Incidence rate was calculated for prevaccine (2008-2011) and postvaccine (2012-2015) periods using person-years at risk within the hospital's referral region. Incidence rate ratio of ceftriaxone treatment episodes of AOM was calculated using the Mantel-Haenzel method adjusting for age. Incidence risk ratio of ceftriaxone treatment if presenting to the hospital with AOM was calculated to adjust for rate of AOM visits.
Visits for AOM decreased from 47.5 to 33.9 visits per 1000 person-years, incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81-0.91), P
PubMed ID
29278616 View in PubMed
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The effect of enhanced hygiene practices on absences due to infectious diseases among children in day care centers in Helsinki.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181219
Source
Infection. 2004 Feb;32(1):2-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
A. Pönkä
T. Poussa
M. Laosmaa
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health, Environment Center, City of Helsinki, Helsinginkatu 24, HYPERLINKFIN-00530, Helsinki, Finland. antti.ponka@hel.fi
Source
Infection. 2004 Feb;32(1):2-7
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Communicable disease control
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diarrhea - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hygiene
Incidence
Infant
Intervention Studies
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control
Primary prevention - methods
Probability
Reference Values
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The occurrence of contagious diseases among children attending day care centers (DCCs) is high. The possibility of reducing absences due to infections with an infection prevention program was investigated.
The intervention study was conducted as an open, controlled cluster study. It included 60 municipal DCCs in one of the seven districts of the City of Helsinki; 228 DCCs in the other six districts served as controls. The main indicator was the occurrence of absences due to upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, eye infection and diarrhea per child-month.
The intervention reduced the absences due to infections by 26% among under 3-year olds, but not among older children. The same phenomenon was observed when similar paired random control DCCs were compared with the intervention DCCs.
Effective prevention of absences due to infections is possible among under 3-year olds by implementing a simple and inexpensive infection control program.
PubMed ID
15007735 View in PubMed
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Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1989 Jan;8(1 Suppl):S9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
J O Klein
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Maxwell Finland Laboratory for Infectious Diseases, Boston, MA 02118.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1989 Jan;8(1 Suppl):S9
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control
Recurrence
Scandinavia
United States
PubMed ID
2927983 View in PubMed
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[Incidence of exudative and adhesive otitis media in data from a center for the treatment of defective hearing]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44450
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1968 Nov 14;130(46):1987-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-1968

Infant health of mothers with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178483
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2004 Oct;26(6):632-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Elsie E Gulick
Shanda Johnson
Author Affiliation
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, College of Nursing, USA.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2004 Oct;26(6):632-49
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bottle Feeding - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Breast Feeding - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Constipation - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Immunologic Factors - therapeutic use
Infant
Infant Welfare
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers - psychology
Multiple Sclerosis - immunology - psychology - therapy
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Social Support
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Controversy surrounds whether mothers with multiple sclerosis (MS) who wish to breast-feed their infants should forego breast-feeding in order to resume immunomodulating therapy following birth even though breast-feeding has not been shown to have deleterious effects on these mothers. Knowledge of potential health benefits to infants through breast-feeding could influence health care providers to encourage mothers with MS who wish to breast-feed to do so. This study of 140 breast-feeding and 35 non-breast-feeding mothers with MS identifies the type and prevalence of illnesses experienced by their infants during the first 6 postpartum months and at 9 months and 12 months. Significantly more non-breast-fed than breast-fed infants experienced otitis media, lower respiratory illness, constipation, milk intolerance, and allergy during the 1st year. Study results support the need to encourage mothers with MS who wish to breast-feed their infants to do so and to delay immunomodulating therapy until breast-feeding cessation.
PubMed ID
15359075 View in PubMed
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A nasal spray with alpha-haemolytic streptococci as long term prophylaxis against recurrent otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31841
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Jan 11;62(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-11-2002
Author
Krister Tano
Eva Grahn Håkansson
Stig E Holm
Sten Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology, Umeå University, S-971 80, Luleå, Sweden. krister.tano@nll.se
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2002 Jan 11;62(1):17-23
Date
Jan-11-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Administration, Intranasal
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Nasopharynx - microbiology
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control
Probability
Recurrence - prevention & control
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Streptococcus
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that children with recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) have significantly lower quantities of alpha-haemolytic streptococci (AHS) in the nasopharynx than healthy children. Furthermore children with otitis media have AHS with lower inhibitory activity in vitro on Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typable Haemophilus influenzae compared with healthy children. A randomised, placebo controlled and double blind clinical study among children with rAOM was designed to determine whether or not a nasal spray, containing AHS with very good inhibitory activity on the three most common OM pathogens, could be an alternative to tympanostomy tube insertion. Forty three children under 4 years of age were included in the study. The children sprayed once daily for 4 months and were monitored for 6 months. Sixteen children in the active group and 20 children in the placebo group were evaluated. The result showed no significant differences regarding the number of episodes of AOM, with seven recurrences in the active group and eight in the placebo group. No significant changes of the nasopharyngeal flora could be detected during the study period regarding the OM pathogens. Nasal spray according to the performed schedule is not yet an alternative to tympanostomy tubes in children with rAOM. The possibility of increasing the efficacy of this ecological treatment, by using pre-treatment antibiotics, more adhesive bacteria and alternative treatment schedules is discussed.
PubMed ID
11738689 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.