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Acute infections and environmental exposure to organochlorines in Inuit infants from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4455
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Carole Vézina
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Center, 945 Wolfe Street, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - analysis - poisoning
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15471725 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and sociomedical risk factors among unselected children in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3493
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1999
Author
P. Homøe
R B Christensen
P. Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. rh03259@rh.dk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 1999 Jun 15;49(1):37-52
Date
Jun-15-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Environment
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the sociomedical risk factors associated with episodes of acute otitis media (AOM), recurrent AOM (rAOM), and chronic otitis media (COM) in Greenlandic children and especially to point out children at high risk of rAOM (defined as > 5 AOM episodes since birth) and COM which are prevalent among Inuit children all over the Arctic. METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional and included 740 unselected children, 3, 4, 5, and 8-years-old, living in two major Greenlandic towns, Nuuk and Sisimiut. All children were otologically examined and the parents answered a questionnaire containing sociomedical variables including ethnicity, family history of OM, housing, insulation, crowding, daycare, passive cigarette smoking, breast feeding, type of diet, allergy, and chronic diseases. Historical data were cross-checked in medical records which also formed the basis for the drop-out analyses. Statistical analyses included frequency tests, calculation of odds ratio (OR), and multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The attendance rate was 86%. Former episode of AOM was reported by 2/3 of the children, rAOM by 20%, and COM by 9%. The following variables were found significantly more often in children with AOM by simple frequency testing: Parental (OR = 1.83), sibling (OR = 1.62), and parental plus sibling (OR = 2.56) history of OM, crowding (OR = 5.55), long period of exclusive breast feeding ( > 4 months) (OR = 2.47), and recent acute disease (P = 0.034). The following variables were found significantly more often in children with rAOM or COM by simple frequency testing: Parental history of OM (OR = 1.60; OR = 2.11, respectively) and no recall of breast feeding (P = 0.005; P = 0.003, respectively). Also, COM was found significantly more often in children with two Greenlandic parents (OR = 3.07). A multiple logistic regression test denoted only parental history of OM (OR = 1.82) and long period of exclusive breast feeding (OR = 1.14) as significant predictors of AOM. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the risk factors usually associated with AOM could not be confirmed as risk factors in this survey. Parental history of OM and long period of exclusive breast feeding were the strongest factors associated with AOM in Greenlandic children and ethnicity was associated with COM. However, the study confirms that AOM is a multifactorial disease determined by a number of genetic and environmental factors.
PubMed ID
10428404 View in PubMed
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Antibiotics in pregnancy increase children's risk of otitis media and ventilation tubes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283543
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 Apr;183:153-158.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Tine Marie Pedersen
Jakob Stokholm
Jonathan Thorsen
Anna-Rosa Cecilie Mora-Jensen
Hans Bisgaard
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 Apr;183:153-158.e1
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Middle Ear Ventilation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To study the association between antibiotic intake in pregnancy and the development of otitis media and placement of ventilation tubes (VTs) in the offspring under the hypothesis that antibiotics in pregnancy may alter the offspring's propensity for disease.
Data from the 700 children in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2010 unselected birth cohort study were used. Information on maternal antibiotic use and other exposures during pregnancy was collected prospectively from interviews and validated in national registries. Otitis media episodes were registered in a prospective diary for 3 years. Information regarding children's VTs was obtained from national registries.
There were 514 children who had diary information and were included in the analysis regarding otitis media episodes. For VTs analysis, 699 children were included. Thirty-seven percent of the mothers received antibiotics during pregnancy, and this was associated with increased risk of otitis media (adjusted hazard ratio 1.30; 95% CI 1.04-1.63; P?=?.02). The risk of receiving VTs was especially associated with third trimester antibiotics (adjusted hazard ratio 1.60; 95% CI 1.08-2.36, P?=?.02). The risk of otitis media increased with increasing number of treatments (per-level adjusted hazard ratio 1.20; 95% CI 1.04-1.40; P?=?.02), but for VTs this association was not significant after adjustment.
Maternal use of antibiotics during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of otitis media and VT insertions in the offspring. Antibiotics late in pregnancy mainly contributed to these effects, pointing toward potential transmission of an unfavorable microbiome from mother to child.
PubMed ID
28088397 View in PubMed
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Barotitis in children after aviation; prevalence and treatment with Otovent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34744
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 1996 Jul;110(7):625-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
S E Stangerup
O. Tjernström
J. Harcourt
M. Klokker
J. Stokholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Gentofte University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Laryngol Otol. 1996 Jul;110(7):625-8
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adolescent
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Barotrauma - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Ear, Middle - injuries
Humans
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Prevalence
Valsalva Maneuver
Abstract
Barotitis is an acute or chronic inflammation caused by environmental pressure changes. The most common cause is the pressure change during descent in civil aviation. To prevent barotitis the middle ear pressure has to be equalised several times during descent. This can be achieved by performing the Valsalva manoeuvre, but for children, many of whom have a dysfunction of the Eustachian tube, this is difficult to perform and they are therefore at high risk of developing barotitis during flight. The traditional treatment modalities of barotitis are inflation by a Politzer balloon, myringotomy or prophylactic grommet insertion. An alternative treatment or prophylactic measure is autoinflation using the Otovent treatment set. This prophylaxis/treatment can be performed by the child with assistance from its parents as soon as possible or rather before the descent has started. The prevalence of barotitis amongst transit passengers was found to be highest in young children, 25 per cent, compared with adults, five per cent. Only 21 per cent of the youngest children with negative middle ear pressure after flight managed a successful Valsalva's manoeuvre, whereas 82 per cent could increase the middle ear pressure inflating the Otovent set. In conclusion we recommend autoinflation using the Otovent set by children and adults with problems clearing the ears during flight.
PubMed ID
8759532 View in PubMed
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[Barotrauma in children and adults after flying. Prevalence and treatment with Otovent]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33954
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Mar 16;160(12):1794-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-1998
Author
S E Stangerup
O. Tjernström
J. Harcourt
M. Klokker
J. Stokholm
Author Affiliation
Ore-, naese-, halsafdelingen, Amtssygehuset i Gentofte.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Mar 16;160(12):1794-6
Date
Mar-16-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustic Impedance Tests
Adolescent
Adult
Aerospace Medicine
Aircraft
Barotrauma - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Eustachian Tube - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Valsalva Maneuver
Abstract
To prevent barotitis during descent in aviation, the ears have to be cleared several times by performing the Valsalva's manoeuvre. The manoeuvre is difficult for children to perform, and they are therefore at high risk of developing barotitis. The treatment of barotitis is either inflation by a Politzer balloon or myringotomy. An alternative treatment is autoinflation using the Otovent. This prophylaxis/treatment can be performed by the child with assistance from its parents as soon as or preferably before the descent has started. The prevalence of barotitis amongst 45 children and 49 adults in transit was found to be highest in children, 28%, compared with adults, 10%. Only 6% of the children with negative middle ear pressure after flight managed a successful Valsalva manoeuvre, whereas 33% could normalise the middle ear pressure by inflating the Otovent. In conclusion we recommend autoinflation using the Otovent set by children and adults who have problems clearing their ears during flight.
PubMed ID
9536635 View in PubMed
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Chronic granulomatous otitis media in bottle-fed Inuit children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2478
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1980 Mar 8;122(5):545-547.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
Timmermans, F.J.W.
Gerson, S.
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University
Source
Canadian Medical Association Journal. 1980 Mar 8;122(5):545-547.
Date
1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nain
Diet, general
Infant feeding
Cholesteatoma
Adolescent
Animals
Bottle Feeding
Breast Feeding
Cattle
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Foreign-Body Reaction
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Milk
Newfoundland
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Otitis media in Inuit children is a problem of relatively recent origin and unknown cause. The prevalence of otitis media in 238 Inuit and 47 Caucasian children in Nain, a small community in Labrador, was determined by examination, and the history of breast-feeding or bottle-feeding was obtained. The prevalence of otitis media was found to be inversely related to the age at which bottle-feeding was started. Clinical observations suggest that otitis media in Inuit children is part of a process leading to chronic foreign body granuloma of the middle ear, and that the granuloma is formed from milk introduced into the relatively short and straight eustachian tubes of Inuit infants by the high negative intraoral pressure necessary for bottle-feeding.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2455.
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Control of the temporal aspect when considering risk factors for acute otitis media.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36307
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993 Apr;119(4):444-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
O P Alho
O. Kilkku
H. Oja
M. Koivu
M. Sorri
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1993 Apr;119(4):444-9
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Child Day Care Centers
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Evaluation Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - complications - epidemiology
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Recurrence
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A random sample of 2512 children was monitored to age 2 years to study the biologic effects of various risk variables on acute otitis media using a new dynamic modeling that controls both the confounding effects and time dependency. Dynamic modeling proved to be superior to conventional approaches, both the random and systematic error being much smaller and the effect estimates being biologically interpretable. The major risk factors were the existence of a previous episode of acute otitis media in general (odds ratio, 2.03; 95% confidence interval [Cl], 1.81 to 2.25) or particularly during the preceding 3 months (odds ratio, 3.74; 95% Cl, 3.40 to 4.10) and attending a day nursery (odds radio, 2.06; 95% Cl, 1.81 to 2.34). As the form of day care is the only modifiable risk variable of significant importance and previous episodes entail a risk of future ones, infants should be cared for at home, particularly after they have already experienced an episode of acute otitis media.
PubMed ID
8457307 View in PubMed
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Early acute otitis media: determined by exposure to respiratory pathogens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34459
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1997;529:14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
K J Kvaerner
P. Nafstad
J. Hagen
I W Mair
J J Jaakkola
Author Affiliation
Section of Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Otolaryngol Suppl. 1997;529:14-8
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child Day Care Centers
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - transmission
Risk factors
Abstract
The purpose of the present study is to assess the relationship between early acute otitis media (AOM) and exposure to respiratory pathogens mediated by siblings and day-care. A prospective cohort of 3,754 Norwegian children born in 1992-93 was followed from birth through 12 months. One or more episodes of AOM had been experienced by 25% of the children before age one. Logistic regression analysis showed that siblings attending day-care is the most important risk factor for early AOM (ORadj = 1.9 (1.4-2.3)). The total number of children in the day-care setting is another determinant for early AOM (ORadj = 2.0 (1.4-2.6) in groups of 4 or more other children and ORadj = 1.3 (1.0-1.7) in groups of 1-3 other children as compared with those who are cared for alone). Siblings who attend day-care and the number of children in the child's own day-care setting are the most important determinants for AOM the first year of life.
PubMed ID
9288257 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.