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Association of radiological hand osteoarthritis with bone mineral mass: a population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172174
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2005 Dec;44(12):1549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
M M Haara
J P A Arokoski
H. Kröger
A. Kärkkäinen
P. Manninen
P. Knekt
O. Impivaara
M. Heliövaara
Author Affiliation
Bone and Cartilage Research Unit (BCRU) and Department of General Practice and Public Health, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. mhaara@hytti.uku.fi
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2005 Dec;44(12):1549-54
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Calcaneus - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Joints - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Metacarpal Bones - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
A number of previous studies have reported an inverse relationship between osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. However, the association has remained controversial because osteoarthritis in hand joints seems to associate differently from osteoarthritis in weight-bearing joints with bone mineral mass. We studied osteoarthritis in distal interphalangeal (DIP) joints and osteoarthritis in the base of the thumb (CMC-1) for their cross-sectional associations with metacarpal cortical bone mineral mass, and for their prediction of calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation.
A population sample of 8000 Finns aged 30 yr and over was invited to a comprehensive health examination in 1978-1980; 90% complied. Hand radiographs were taken from 3568 participants to diagnose osteoarthritis in various hand joints, and to determine two indicators of cortical bone mineral mass, the combined cortical thickness (CCT) and the metacarpal index (MCI). Calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation was measured 20 yr later in 340 of these participants with the Sahara sonometer.
In the cross-sectional setting, osteoarthritis in the DIP joints and osteoarthritis in the base of the thumb (CMC-1) were significantly associated with low CCT and low MCI. These associations were proportional to the radiological severity of osteoarthritis. In the follow-up setting, symmetrical DIP osteoarthritis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, education, workload and MCI significantly predicted low values of broadband ultrasound attenuation.
Our results indicate a direct relation of both radiological DIP osteoarthritis and CMC-1 osteoarthritis with low cortical bone mineral mass, in proportion to the severity of osteoarthritis. The presence of symmetrical DIP osteoarthritis, a possible indicator of generalized osteoarthritis, suggests an increased risk of osteoporosis over time.
PubMed ID
16263784 View in PubMed
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Associations between dietary cadmium exposure and bone mineral density and risk of osteoporosis and fractures among women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125636
Source
Bone. 2012 Jun;50(6):1372-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Annette Engström
Karl Michaëlsson
Marie Vahter
Bettina Julin
Alicja Wolk
Agneta Åkesson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Bone. 2012 Jun;50(6):1372-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density - drug effects
Cadmium - administration & dosage - adverse effects - urine
Cohort Studies
Female
Food contamination - analysis
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Osteoporosis and its main health outcome, fragility fractures, are large and escalating public health problems. Cadmium, a widespread food contaminant, is a proposed risk factor; still the association between estimated dietary cadmium exposure and bone mineral density (BMD) has never been assessed. Within a sub-cohort of the Swedish Mammography Cohort, we assessed dietary cadmium exposure based on a food frequency questionnaire (1997) and urinary cadmium (2004-2008) in relation to total-body BMD and risk of osteoporosis and fractures (1997-2009) among 2676 women (aged 56-69 years). In multivariable-adjusted linear regression, dietary cadmium was inversely associated with BMD at the total body and lumbar spine. After further adjustment for dietary factors important for bone health and cadmium bioavailability--calcium, magnesium, iron and fiber, the associations became more pronounced. A 32% increased risk of osteoporosis (95% CI: 2-71%) and 31% increased risk for any first incident fracture (95% CI: 2-69%) were observed comparing high dietary cadmium exposure (=13 µg/day, median) with lower exposures (
PubMed ID
22465267 View in PubMed
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Bone mineral density, bone markers, and fractures in adult males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118415
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Mar;168(3):331-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Henrik Falhammar
Helena Filipsson Nyström
Anna Wedell
Kerstin Brismar
Marja Thorén
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes, D02:04, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.falhammar@ki.se
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Mar;168(3):331-41
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital - drug therapy - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Genetic Association Studies
Glucocorticoids - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Hormone Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Osteocalcin - blood
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Steroid 21-Hydroxylase - genetics - metabolism
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine bone mineral density (BMD), markers of bone metabolism, fractures, and steroids reflecting hormonal control in adult males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). SUBJECTS, METHODS, AND DESIGN: We compared CAH males with 21-hydroxylase deficiency (n=30), 19-67 years old, with age- and sex-matched controls (n=32). Subgroups of CYP21A2 genotypes, age, glucocorticoid preparation, poor control vs overtreatment, and early vs late (>36 months) diagnosis were studied. BMD measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and markers of bone metabolism and androgens/17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were investigated.
All, including older (>30 years), CAH patients had lower BMD in all measured sites compared with control subjects. The null group demonstrated lower BMD in more locations than the other groups. Osteoporosis/osteopenia was present in 81% of CAH patients compared with 32% in controls (=30 years). Fracture frequency was similar, osteocalcin was lower, and fewer patients than controls had vitamin D insufficiency. IGF1 was elevated in the milder genotypes. In patients, total body BMD was positively correlated to weight, BMI, total lean body mass, and triglycerides, and negatively to prolactin. Patients on prednisolone had lower BMD and osteocalcin levels than those on hydrocortisone/cortisone acetate. Patients with poor control had higher femoral neck BMD. There were no differences in BMD between patients with an early vs late diagnosis.
CAH males have low BMD and bone formation markers. BMD should be monitored, adequate prophylaxis and treatment established, and glucocorticoid doses optimized to minimize the risk of future fractures.
PubMed ID
23211577 View in PubMed
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[Bone mineral density in patients with gluten-sensitivity celiac disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144245
Source
Ter Arkh. 2010;82(2):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
E A Albulova
V N Drozdov
A I Parfenov
Iu V Viazhevich
A V Petrakov
G G Varvanina
Source
Ter Arkh. 2010;82(2):43-8
Date
2010
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Bone Density
Celiac Disease - complications - metabolism
Female
Femur Neck - radiography
Follow-Up Studies
Glutens
Humans
Incidence
Lumbar vertebrae - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology - metabolism
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
to determine the frequency of development of osteopenia/ostoporosis (OP) vitamin D deficiency, some population risk factors, and the effects of alpha-calcidol and calcitriol on bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with gluten-sensitivity celiac disease (GSCD).
Densitometry of the lumbar vertebra and femoral neck (FN) was carried out in 47 patients with GSCD. Their sera were tested for 25OHD3, 1,25(OH)2D3, total alkaline phosphatase, calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone (PTH), type 1 collagen type C-telopeptides (CrossLaps) and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-alpha), as well as urinary creatinine and calcium.
The T score below -1 was found in 37 (78.7%) of the patients. BMD reduced to the level of osteopenia in 51.1% of the patients; OP was detected in 27.7%. Lower BMD was noted in 19 (95%) of the 20 menopausal women and in 15 (68.2%) of the 22 females with preserved menstrual function (p = 0.047). The mean value of 250 HD3 was 47.8 +/- 5.0 in patients with OP patients and 85.6 +/- 7.1 ng/l in those with normal BMD (p
PubMed ID
20387675 View in PubMed
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Calcium, phosphorus, and osteoporosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244372
Source
Fed Proc. 1981 Jul;40(9):2434-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Author
H H Draper
C A Scythes
Source
Fed Proc. 1981 Jul;40(9):2434-8
Date
Jul-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Calcium - deficiency
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Dairy Products
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology
Phosphorus - administration & dosage
United States
Abstract
Gross epidemiological data indicate there are no significant differences in rates of aging osteopenia among countries with substantially different amounts of Ca in their national food supplies. This-observation, plus the fact that Ca administration fails to reverse osteoporotic bone loss, has led some investigators to conclude that Ca nutrition is an insignificant factor in the etiology of osteoporosis. However, it has become apparent that a Ca intake that may be adequate for adults consuming a low protein, low P, neural, or alkaline cereal-based diet is not necessarily adequate for subjects consuming a high protein, high P, acidic mixed Western diet. Ca administration inhibits postmenopausal osteopenia and there is epidemiological evidence that a liberal Ca intake reduces bone loss in middle adulthood. Ca intakes in the United States and Canada appear generally satisfactory among children and young adults, but low intakes by many individuals of middle age is a cause for concern, especially among women. Although the Ca:P ratio for the average diet consumed in these countries (about 1:1.6) appears to be satisfactory, a low intake of dairy foods, coupled with a high intake of other foods rich in natural and added phosphorus, may raise the ratio above 1:2, a value beyond which animal studies indicate that there is a risk of increased bone loss.
PubMed ID
7250388 View in PubMed
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Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and risk of osteoporotic fractures; a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106783
Source
Br J Haematol. 2013 Dec;163(5):603-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Sarah Farmer
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Hanne Vestergaard
Anne Pernille Hermann
Henrik Frederiksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Haematology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark.
Source
Br J Haematol. 2013 Dec;163(5):603-10
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Spontaneous - epidemiology - etiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology
Polycythemia Vera - complications
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology
Thrombocythemia, Essential - complications
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients with systemic mastocytosis have an increased risk of osteoporosis, however, the risk of osteoporotic fractures among the classic chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (CMPN), including essential thrombocythaemia (ET), polycythaemia vera (PV) and chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), is unknown. We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine the risk of osteoporotic fractures among three cohorts of patients with newly diagnosed ET, PV, and CML. Patients were identified in medical registers including all Danish hospitals during 1980-2010 and were followed until first osteoporotic fracture. Fracture risk was compared to cohorts from the general population matched on age, sex and calendar year. We followed 7595 CMPN patients and 338 974 comparison cohort members. We found that the risk of femoral fracture after 5 years was consistently higher than the general population, being 3·01% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2·20-4·10), 4·74% (95%CI: 4·06-5·52) and 4·64% (95%CI: 3·29-6·53) among ET, PV, and CML patients respectively. Adjusted hazard ratio for femoral fracture was increased 1·19-fold (95% CI: 0·94-1·51) for ET patients, 1·82-fold (95% CI: 1·62-2·04) for PV patients, and 2·67-fold (95% CI: 1·97-3·62) for CML patients. We conclude that CMPN patients are at higher risk of osteoporotic fractures than the general population.
PubMed ID
24111669 View in PubMed
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The female athlete triad: are elite athletes at increased risk?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176307
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Feb;37(2):184-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Monica Klungland Torstveit
Jorunn Sundgot-Borgen
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian University of Sport and Physical Education, PO Box 4014, Ullevaal Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway. monica.torstveit@nih.no
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Feb;37(2):184-93
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amenorrhea - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Body mass index
Body Weight
Eating Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Norway - epidemiology
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Physical Education and Training
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sports
Women's health
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the percentage of elite athletes and controls at risk of the female athlete triad.
A detailed questionnaire, which included questions regarding training and/or physical activity patterns, menstrual history, oral contraceptive use, weight history, eating patterns, dietary history, and the Body Dissatisfaction (BD) and Drive for Thinness (DT) subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI), was prepared. The questionnaire was administered to the total population of female elite athletes in Norway representing the national teams at the junior or senior level, 13-39 yr of age (N = 938) and non-athlete controls in the same age group (N = 900). After exclusion, a total of 669 athletes (88%) and 607 controls (70%) completed the questionnaire satisfactorily.
A higher percentage of controls (69.2%) than athletes (60.4%) was classified as being at risk of the Triad (P
Notes
Comment In: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 May;38(5):1021; author reply 102216672859
Comment In: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Sep;37(9):1643; author reply 164416177622
Comment In: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 May;38(5):1020; author reply 102216672858
PubMed ID
15692312 View in PubMed
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Increasing parathyroid hormone concentrations in untreated primary hyperparathyroidism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222810
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 Nov;232(5):421-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
M. Rudnicki
I. Transbøl
Author Affiliation
Mineral Metabolic Research Group, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Intern Med. 1992 Nov;232(5):421-5
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Calcifediol - blood
Calcium - blood
Creatinine - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism - blood - complications - therapy
Immunoradiometric Assay
Kidney Calculi - epidemiology - etiology
Least-Squares Analysis
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Phosphorus - blood
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
Twenty-four patients with mild to moderate primary hyperparathyroidism were followed for an average of 2.45 years with serial determinations of serum ionized calcium and intact parathyroid hormone (PTH). For the entire group serum ionized calcium remained stable, whereas serum PTH increased significantly. Eleven patients (group 1) demonstrated a significant increase in PTH with time. The remaining 13 patients formed group 2. Comparison of the changes (%) in each subgroup showed a small but significant increase in serum ionized calcium of 2.6% with time in group 1, while serum PTH increased by 78%. In group 2 serum ionized calcium remained stable whereas PTH increased modestly by 22%. Serum concentrations of creatinine were stable throughout the follow-up period in both groups. Despite the greater precision of serum ionized calcium, measurements of intact PTH are evidently more sensitive than measurements of serum ionized calcium for the detection of progression in primary hyperparathyroidism.
PubMed ID
1453126 View in PubMed
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Low bone mass in past and present aboriginal populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4895
Source
Adv Nutr Res. 1994;9:35-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994

20 records – page 1 of 2.