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Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender-related content in undergraduate medical education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131492
Source
JAMA. 2011 Sep 7;306(9):971-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-2011
Author
Juno Obedin-Maliver
Elizabeth S Goldsmith
Leslie Stewart
William White
Eric Tran
Stephanie Brenman
Maggie Wells
David M Fetterman
Gabriel Garcia
Mitchell R Lunn
Author Affiliation
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Medical Education Research Group, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
JAMA. 2011 Sep 7;306(9):971-7
Date
Sep-7-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bisexuality
Canada
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - statistics & numerical data
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Osteopathic Medicine - education
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Transsexualism
United States
Abstract
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals experience health and health care disparities and have specific health care needs. Medical education organizations have called for LGBT-sensitive training, but how and to what extent schools educate students to deliver comprehensive LGBT patient care is unknown.
To characterize LGBT-related medical curricula and associated curricular development practices and to determine deans' assessments of their institutions' LGBT-related curricular content.
Deans of medical education (or equivalent) at 176 allopathic or osteopathic medical schools in Canada and the United States were surveyed to complete a 13-question, Web-based questionnaire between May 2009 and March 2010.
Reported hours of LGBT-related curricular content.
Of 176 schools, 150 (85.2%) responded, and 132 (75.0%) fully completed the questionnaire. The median reported time dedicated to teaching LGBT-related content in the entire curriculum was 5 hours (interquartile range [IQR], 3-8 hours). Of the 132 respondents, 9 (6.8%; 95% CI, 2.5%-11.1%) reported 0 hours taught during preclinical years and 44 (33.3%; 95% CI, 25.3%-41.4%) reported 0 hours during clinical years. Median US allopathic clinical hours were significantly different from US osteopathic clinical hours (2 hours [IQR, 0-4 hours] vs 0 hours [IQR, 0-2 hours]; P = .008). Although 128 of the schools (97.0%; 95% CI, 94.0%-99.9%) taught students to ask patients if they "have sex with men, women, or both" when obtaining a sexual history, the reported teaching frequency of 16 LGBT-specific topic areas in the required curriculum was lower: at least 8 topics at 83 schools (62.9%; 95% CI, 54.6%-71.1%) and all topics at 11 schools (8.3%; 95% CI, 3.6%-13.0%). The institutions' LGBT content was rated as "fair" at 58 schools (43.9%; 95% CI, 35.5%-52.4%). Suggested successful strategies to increase content included curricular material focusing on LGBT-related health and health disparities at 77 schools (58.3%, 95% CI, 49.9%-66.7%) and faculty willing and able to teach LGBT-related curricular content at 67 schools (50.8%, 95% CI, 42.2%-59.3%).
The median reported time dedicated to LGBT-related topics in 2009-2010 was small across US and Canadian medical schools, but the quantity, content covered, and perceived quality of instruction varied substantially.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 2011 Dec 7;306(21):2326; author reply 2326-722147376
Comment In: JAMA. 2011 Sep 7;306(9):997-821900143
PubMed ID
21900137 View in PubMed
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The state of ophthalmology medical student education in the United States and Canada, 2012 through 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105001
Source
Ophthalmology. 2014 Jun;121(6):1160-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Manjool Shah
Daniel Knoch
Evan Waxman
Author Affiliation
Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon.
Source
Ophthalmology. 2014 Jun;121(6):1160-3
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Ophthalmology - education
Osteopathic Medicine - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - standards
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
To characterize the state of ophthalmology medical student education in the United States and Canada.
Survey of United States and Canadian medical schools.
One hundred thirty-five Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology (AUPO) member institutions were surveyed, along with 30 osteopathic medical schools in the United States and 40 non-AUPO-affiliated allopathic medical schools in the United States.
A survey characterizing preclinical, clinical, and extracurricular exposures to ophthalmology was used.
Response rate, presence of, and types of preclinical and clinical exposures.
Response rates to the survey were lower from non-AUPO institutions. Preclinical exposures largely consisted of basic lectures and examination skills, and most responding institutions had some sort of required preclinical ophthalmology experience. Clinical exposures were more variable, with an overall rate of required clinical rotations diminishing.
There continues to be a gradual erosion of the role of ophthalmic medical education in the standard medical school curriculum. Clearly, there is room for improvement across all types of medical educational institutions.
Notes
Comment In: Ophthalmology. 2014 Jun;121(6):1157-924893767
PubMed ID
24518616 View in PubMed
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