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Abnormal diurnal rhythm of urine output following renal transplantation: the impact of blood pressure and diuretics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139130
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
K. Alstrup
C. Graugaard-Jensen
S. Rittig
K A Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark. karenalstrup@dadlnet.dk
Source
Transplant Proc. 2010 Nov;42(9):3529-36
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Circadian Rhythm
Denmark
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drinking
Female
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Polyuria - drug therapy - etiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Urination - drug effects
Urodynamics - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Nocturnal polyuria is the excretion at night of an excessive volume of urine. A major problem following renal transplantation is an abnormal diurnal rhythmicity in urine output. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria among renal transplant recipients in the early period after transplantation as well as at least 1 year after transplantation. We aimed to explore possible pathophysiological mechanisms behind nocturnal polyuria in this group of patients, focusing on the impact of blood pressure and medication.
Seventeen recently transplanted patients 17 late transplant recipients, and 17 healthy controls were included in the study. Voiding habits were assessed by completion of a frequency-volume chart recording all fluid intakes and voiding. A concomitant 24-hour blood pressure profile was obtained in all.
Renal transplant recipients had a high prevalence of nocturnal polyuria (74%) and a disturbed blood pressure profile with a lack of appropriate nocturnal dipping (P
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2012 Mar;187(3):96422325519
PubMed ID
21094810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related susceptibility to experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis: immunological and electrophysiological aspects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57596
Source
Muscle Nerve. 1997 Sep;20(9):1091-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
A C Hoedemaekers
J J Verschuuren
F. Spaans
Y F Graus
S. Riemersma
P J van Breda Vriesman
M H De Baets
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Source
Muscle Nerve. 1997 Sep;20(9):1091-101
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - immunology - physiology
Animals
Antibodies - immunology
Chronic Disease
Disease Susceptibility
Electrophysiology
Female
Immunization
Myasthenia Gravis - immunology - physiopathology
Neuromuscular Junction - physiopathology
Osmolar Concentration
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred Lew
Receptors, Cholinergic - immunology - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Synaptic Transmission
Abstract
Susceptibility to experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) was found to decrease with aging in both Lewis and Brown Norway (BN) rats. In this study, the difference in susceptibility between young and aged Lewis and BN rats was used to analyze factors determining the clinical severity of EAMG. The incidence and severity of muscular weakness did not correlate with acetylcholine receptor (AChR) loss nor with the ability of antibodies to interfere with AChR function. Aged rats showed significantly lower anti-rat AChR antibody titers than young rats and developed less severe or no clinical signs of disease. In individual young or aged rats, however, no significant correlation was found between the clinical signs of disease and anti-rat AChR titer. Neuromuscular transmission was found to change with aging as measured by single-fiber electromyography (SFEMG). In aged BN rats, increased jitter and blockings were found even before EAMG induction. Despite this disturbed neuromuscular transmission, these aged BN rats were clinically resistant against induction of EAMG. The results of this study indicate that the age-related susceptibility to EAMG is influenced by factors determined by the immune attack as well as mechanisms at the level of the neuromuscular junction.
PubMed ID
9270663 View in PubMed
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Antifreeze activity in the gastrointestinal fluids of Arctogadus glacialis (Peters 1874) is dependent on food type.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4728
Source
J Exp Biol. 2005 Jul;208(Pt 13):2609-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Kim Praebel
Hans Ramløv
Author Affiliation
University of Tromsø, Norwegian College of Fishery Science, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. kim.praebel@nfh.uit.no
Source
J Exp Biol. 2005 Jul;208(Pt 13):2609-13
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antifreeze Proteins - metabolism
Cations - metabolism
Comparative Study
Diet
Digestion - physiology
Electrophoresis
Fishes - metabolism - physiology
Gastrointestinal Tract - metabolism
Greenland
Osmolar Concentration
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Transition Temperature
Abstract
The influence of two food types, Boreogadus saida (Bs) and crustaceans (Cr), on the osmolality, ion concentrations, antifreeze activity and antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGP) distribution in the gastrointestinal fluids of the Arctic gadoid Arctogadus glacialis was determined. The gastrointestinal fluids were hyperosmotic to serum but no significant differences in osmolality were found between the two food types. The food type significantly affected the antifreeze activity of the mid-gut fluids. The hysteresis freezing points, -3.27+/-0.30 degrees C and -2.44+/-0.11 degrees C for B. saida and crustaceans, respectively, were significantly lower than that of serum (-1.99+/-0.07 degrees C). Furthermore, an exceptionally large thermal hysteresis ranging from 1.47+/-0.19 degrees C to 2.04+/-0.30 degrees C was observed in the intestinal fluids of fish feeding on B. saida. Native gel electrophoresis revealed that the gastrointestinal fluids contained AFGPs in all the different size groups. However, differences in band intensities for the two food types suggest that the ingested food has an influence on the concentration of the different AFGP-sizes in these fluids. A decrease in band intensities combined with a drop in thermal hysteresis from mid-gut to hind-gut fluid suggests that absorption of AFGP or possibly degradation occur during digestion.
PubMed ID
15961746 View in PubMed
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The association between IGF-I and insulin resistance: a general population study in Danish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126601
Source
Diabetes Care. 2012 Apr;35(4):768-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Nele Friedrich
Betina Thuesen
Torben Jørgensen
Anders Juul
Christin Spielhagen
Henri Wallaschofksi
Allan Linneberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. nele.friedrich@uni-greifswald.de
Source
Diabetes Care. 2012 Apr;35(4):768-73
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - analysis - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Population
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
IGF-I has an almost 50% amino acid sequence homology with insulin and elicits nearly the same hypoglycemic response. Studies showed that low and high IGF-I levels are related to impaired glucose tolerance and to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the association between IGF-I level and insulin resistance in a Danish general population.
Included were 3,354 adults, aged 19-72 years, from the cross-sectional Health2006 study. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as the index to estimate insulin resistance. Serum IGF-I levels were determined by an immunoassay and grouped into quintiles (Q1-Q5). Linear or multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed.
In the study population, 520 subjects (15.5%) had increased HOMA-IR values above 2.5. After adjustment for age, sex, physical activity, and waist-to-height ratio, a U-shaped association between IGF-I and HOMA-IR was found. Low IGF-I (Q1: odds ratio [OR] 1.65 [95% CI 1.16-2.34], P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22374641 View in PubMed
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ATP-induced cytoplasmic calcium mobilization in Bergmann glial cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11322
Source
J Neurosci. 1995 Dec;15(12):7861-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
S. Kirischuk
T. Möller
N. Voitenko
H. Kettenmann
A. Verkhratsky
Author Affiliation
Bogomoletz Institute of Physiology, Kiev-24, Ukraine.
Source
J Neurosci. 1995 Dec;15(12):7861-71
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphate - pharmacology
Animals
Biological Transport - drug effects
Calcium - metabolism
Cerebellum - cytology - metabolism
Cytoplasm - metabolism
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate - pharmacology
Mice
Neuroglia - metabolism
Osmolar Concentration
Receptors, Purinergic P2 - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Subcellular Fractions - metabolism
Abstract
ATP receptor mediated Ca2+ signaling was recorded from Bergmann glial cells in cerebellar slices obtained from mice of different ages (postnatal days 6 to 45). To measure the cytoplasmic concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]in), either individual cells were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive probes using the whole cell patch clamp technique or slices were incubated with the dye and the microfluorimetric system was focused on individual cells. Signals were recorded either with single-detector microfluorimetry of the dye fura-2 or by confocal laser scanning microfluorimetry (fluo-3-based recordings). Extracellular application of 100 microns ATP caused a transient elevation of [Ca2+]in, which amplitude was significantly higher in Bergmann glial cell processes as compared with their soma. The rank order of potency for the purinoreceptor agonists was: ADP > or = ATP > UTP >> AMP = adenosine = alpha, beta-methylene-ATP. ATP-triggered Ca2+ transients were reversibly inhibited by the P2 purinoreceptor agonist suramin (100 microM). The involvement of P2 metabotropic receptors is inferred by the observation that ATP mediated cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients were not associated with a measurable change in membrane conductance. The [Ca2+]in increase was due to release from inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive intracellular stores since responses were still observed in Ca(2+)-free extracellular solutions and were irreversibly blocked by the inhibitor of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, thapsigargin, and by the competitive inhibitor of the InsP3-gated intracellular Ca2+ channels heparin. Intracellular dialysis altered the refilling process of the InsP3-sensitive stores, suggesting that cytoplasmic factors control ATP mediated Ca2+ signalling.
PubMed ID
8613725 View in PubMed
Less detail

Carbon monoxide photoproduction: implications for photoreactivity of Arctic permafrost-derived soil dissolved organic matter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267448
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9113-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-2014
Author
Jun Hong
Huixiang Xie
Laodong Guo
Guisheng Song
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Aug 19;48(16):9113-21
Date
Aug-19-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Carbon Monoxide - chemistry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Osmolar Concentration
Permafrost - chemistry
Photochemical Processes
Rivers
Sunlight
Temperature
Abstract
Apparent quantum yields of carbon monoxide (CO) photoproduction (AQY(CO)) for permafrost-derived soil dissolved organic matter (SDOM) from the Yukon River Basin and Alaska coast were determined to examine the dependences of AQY(CO) on temperature, ionic strength, pH, and SDOM concentration. SDOM from different locations and soil depths all exhibited similar AQY(CO) spectra irrespective of soil age. AQY(CO) increased by 68% for a 20 °C warming, decreased by 25% from ionic strength 0 to 0.7 mol L(-1), and dropped by 25-38% from pH 4 to 8. These effects combined together could reduce AQY(CO) by up to 72% when SDOM transits from terrestrial environemnts to open-ocean conditions during summer in the Arctic. A Michaelis-Menten kinetics characterized the influence of SDOM dilution on AQY(CO) with a very low substrate half-saturation concentration. Generalized global-scale relationships between AQY(CO) and salinity and absorbance demostrate that the CO-based photoreactivity of ancient permaforst SDOM is comparable to that of modern riverine DOM and that the effects of the physicochemical variables revealed here alone could account for the seaward decline of AQY(CO) observed in diverse estuarine and coastal water bodies.
PubMed ID
25029258 View in PubMed
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Changes in metabolism and blood flow in peripheral tissue (skeletal muscle) during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass: the biochemical microdialysis study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57240
Source
Perfusion. 2004 Jan;19(1):53-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
J. Mand'ák
P. Zivný
V. Lonský
V. Palicka
D. Kakrdová
M. Marsíková
P. Kunes
J. Kubícek
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiac Surgery, Charles University Hospital, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic. jiri.mandak@centrum.cz
Source
Perfusion. 2004 Jan;19(1):53-63
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Comparative Study
Equipment Design
Extracellular Fluid - metabolism
Female
Gentamicins - pharmacokinetics
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Lactic Acid - metabolism
Male
Microdialysis - instrumentation
Middle Aged
Muscle, Skeletal - blood supply - metabolism
Osmolar Concentration
Postoperative Period
Regional Blood Flow
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The aim of this study was to monitor the metabolism and blood flow in the interstitium of the skeletal muscle during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and in the early postoperative period by means of microdialysis and to compare metabolic changes during CPB at normothermia (NT) and hypothermia (HT). Surgical revascularization using CPB was performed in 50 patients, 25 patients (group HT) were operated using hypothermic CPB, 25 (group NT) using normothermic CPB. Interstitial microdialysis was performed by two CMA 60 probes (CMA Microdialysis AB, Solna, Sweden) inserted into the patient's deltoid muscle. Constituents analysed in the obtained dialysates, collected at intervals, were glucose, urea, glycerol and lactate. Tissue blood flow was monitored by dynamic microdialysis with gentamicin as a marker. In both groups, NT versus HT, similar dynamics of concentrations were found. Low initial concentrations were followed by gradual increases during CPB and in the following phase of the operation. Concentrations were higher in the NT group. Immediately after the operation, the decrease in values continued, with a gradual increase in the succeeding postoperative period in both groups. Similar dynamic changes in the lactate concentration were found in both groups. The gentamicin concentrations were lower in the NT group (versus the HT group). The results showed dynamic changes in the interstitial concentrations of glucose, urea, glycerol and lactate, which depend on the phase of the surgery in the CPB and early postoperative phase in the both groups of patients. Higher tissue perfusion of the skeletal muscle was noted in those patients operated on in normothermia. The dynamics of the concentration changes of these substances in the interstitium of the skeletal muscle has been proven to be caused by both the metabolic activity of the tissue and by the blood flow through the interstitium of the muscle.
PubMed ID
15072256 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of 46 heterozygous carriers and 57 unaffected relatives in five Danish families with familial defective apolipoprotein B-100.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35895
Source
Arterioscler Thromb. 1994 Feb;14(2):207-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
P S Hansen
H. Meinertz
H K Jensen
P. Fruergaard
J. Launbjerg
I C Klausen
L. Lemming
U. Gerdes
N. Gregersen
O. Faergeman
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology A, Aarhus Amtsygehus University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb. 1994 Feb;14(2):207-13
Date
Feb-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Apolipoproteins B - analysis - genetics
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Arteriosclerosis - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol - blood
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Genotype
Haplotypes
Heterozygote
Humans
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Osmolar Concentration
Polymorphism, Genetic
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Plasma concentrations of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, apolipoprotein (apo) B, and lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) in 46 persons heterozygous for the apo B-3500 mutation causing familial defective apo B-100 (FDB) were compared with those in 57 non-FDB relatives. FDB patients had 50% to 70% higher mean concentrations of cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and apo B than non-FDB relatives (P 50 years old had atherosclerotic disease. In contrast, all 18 non-FDB relatives > 50 years old were apparently healthy. A total of 8 FDB patients with atherosclerotic disease had 36% higher cholesterol concentrations, 28% higher apo B concentrations, 50% higher triglyceride concentrations, and 120% higher Lp(a) concentrations than FDB patients without clinical atherosclerosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8305410 View in PubMed
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Characterization of hydrotropism: the timing of perception and signal movement from the root cap in the agravitropic pea mutant ageotropum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11172
Source
Plant Cell Physiol. 1996 Sep;37(6):800-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
C. Stinemetz
H. Takahashi
H. Suge
Author Affiliation
Biology Department, Rhodes College, Memphis, Tennessee 38112, USA.
Source
Plant Cell Physiol. 1996 Sep;37(6):800-5
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Gravitropism - genetics - physiology
Mutation
Osmolar Concentration
Peas - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Plant Root Cap - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Plant Roots - genetics - growth & development - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Signal Transduction - genetics - physiology
Sorbitol
Time Factors
Tropism - genetics - physiology
Water
Abstract
In this study, ageotropum pea mutant was used to determine the threshold time for perception of an osmotic stimulation in the root cap and the time requirement for transduction and transmission of the hydrotropic signal from the root cap to the elongation region. The threshold time for the perception of an osmotic stimulation was compared to current estimates of threshold times for graviperception in roots. The time required for transduction and transmission in the hydrotropic response of ageotropum was compared to the time requirement in the gravity response of Alaska pea roots. We determined that threshold time for perception of an osmotic stimulation in the root cap is very rapid, occurring in less than 2 min following the application of sorbitol to the root cap. Furthermore, a single 5 min exposure of sorbitol to the root cap fully induced a hydrotropic response. We also found that transduction and transmission of an osmotic stimulus requires 90-120 min for movement from the root cap to more basal tissues involved in differential growth leading to root curvature. The very rapid threshold time for perception of root hydrotropism is similar to those times reported for root gravitropism. However, the time required for the transduction and transmission of an osmotic stimulation from the root cap is significantly longer than the time required in gravitropism. These results suggest that there must exist some differences between root hydrotropism and gravitropism in either the rate or mechanisms of transduction and transmission of the tropistic signal from the root cap.
PubMed ID
11536779 View in PubMed
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Clinical trial program for iopentol. A new nonionic ratio 3.0 contrast medium with emphasis on clinical phases I and II.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232575
Source
Invest Radiol. 1988 Sep;23 Suppl 1:S189-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1988
Author
E. Andrew
A. Waaler
J. Jakobsen
T. Holager
M. Lambrechts
A. Moxnes
E. Kruger Hagen
T. Bach-Gansmo
Author Affiliation
Clinical Department, Nycomed AS, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Invest Radiol. 1988 Sep;23 Suppl 1:S189-92
Date
Sep-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Contrast Media - toxicity
Drug Evaluation
Drug Tolerance
Humans
Iodobenzoates - toxicity
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Norway
Osmolar Concentration
Triiodobenzoic Acids - diagnostic use - toxicity
Abstract
Iopentol is a new nonionic, water-soluble ratio 3.0 roentgen contrast medium (CM) for vascular use. The aim is to present the vascular clinical trial program for iopentol and to report the findings from the clinical phases I and II. The clinical program started with an intravenous (IV) safety and pharmacokinetic phase I trial (24 volunteers) and continued with six open, noncomparative phase II trials (61 patients) for studying cardiovascular and arterial tolerance (two trials in cardioangiography), venous tolerance (two trials in IV computed tomography [CT] enhancement), and cerebral and arterial tolerance (2 trials in cerebral arteriography). One volunteer in the phase I trial was excluded because of a vasovagal reaction following saline injection, and four patients were protocol deviators in cardioangiography. Mainly renal glomerular filtration of unmetabolized iopentol, close to 100% recovered after 24 hours in the urine, was found in the phase I study. No unexpected or severe contrast-induced reactions were encountered in phases I and II. Good diagnostic efficiency was obtained in phase II. As also expected, iopentol seemed to be well-tolerated. However, its relative efficiency and tolerance profile can only be documented from the ongoing comparative phase III trials.
PubMed ID
3058629 View in PubMed
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76 records – page 1 of 8.