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Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patient education and cost of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137482
Source
Orthop Nurs. 2011 Jan-Feb;30(1):20-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katja Heikkinen
Sanna Salanterä
Reima Suomi
Annika Lindblom
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Katja Heikkinen, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Orthop Nurs. 2011 Jan-Feb;30(1):20-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - economics
Female
Finland
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Orthopedics - economics
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe and compare ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' reported cost of care (out-of-pocket costs, use of time, and consultations with healthcare organizations) and nurses' cost of care (use of time and consultations with other professionals such as other nurses, physicians, and anesthesiologists) when patients receive 2 different types of patient education (Internet-based or face-to-face).
Pretest/posttest design.
Random assignment of all ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients in a university hospital in Finland.
The experimental group received Web-based patient education and the control group received face-to-face patient education.
Financial and time costs.
Pre-, intra-, and postoperative costs did not differ between the groups. However, Internet-based education was more time-consuming for the patient and face-to-face education was more time-consuming for the nurse. There were no differences between the groups in patients' use of consultations of healthcare professionals. Nurses' consultations were few and did not differ between the groups. The small number of patients' and nurses' consultations indicates that patients in both education methods had enough knowledge to deal with the surgery.
PubMed ID
21278551 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Dec 2;153(49):3479-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2-1991
Author
H. Thomsen
P. Angermann
S. Backs
T. Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling, Centralsygehuset i Naestved.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Dec 2;153(49):3479-82
Date
Dec-2-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - economics - methods - standards
Denmark
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Orthopedics - economics - methods - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
A one year survey of the patients assessment of out-patient orthopaedic surgery in local anaesthesia is presented. The report is based upon questionnaires (including 15 items) of 529 operations performed on 495 patients. A large group of knee arthroscopies are included. We found that many orthopaedic operations, formerly treated as in-patient procedures could be carried out in the out-patient clinic with only a minimal complication rate. 77% of the patients experienced no problems other than pain in their home following the out-patient surgical procedure. Nearly 80% of the patients would choose out-patient surgery in case of a new identical operation. 30% of the patients found the administration of the local anaesthesia very painful and 41% experienced discomfort and pain following surgery. In addition, a brief analysis of the economical aspect is given. In conclusion, out-patient orthopaedic surgery is well accepted by the patients. The use of local anesthesia alone is not always sufficient and administration of an oral analgesic drug both before and after the surgical procedure is recommended.
PubMed ID
1776182 View in PubMed
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Clinical effectiveness and cost analysis of patient referral by videoconferencing in orthopaedics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193684
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(4):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
K. Harno
E. Arajärvi
T. Paavola
C. Carlson
P. Viikinkoski
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Administration, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. kari.harno@hus.fi
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2001;7(4):219-25
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care - economics - organization & administration - standards
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Finland
Hospitals, District
Hospitals, General
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Middle Aged
Orthopedics - economics - organization & administration - standards
Primary Health Care - economics - organization & administration - standards
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Remote Consultation - economics - organization & administration - standards
Treatment Outcome
Video Recording
Workload
Abstract
The clinical effectiveness and costs of videoconferencing in orthopaedics between primary and secondary care were examined in an eight-month prospective, comparative study. The general surgery outpatient clinics of two Finnish district hospitals were compared: Peijas Hospital, with telemedicine, and Hyvinkää Hospital, without it. The three study primary-care centres referred a total of 419 adult patients to the outpatient clinics. The population-based number of referrals to Peijas Hospital was similar to that to Hyvinkää Hospital after adjusting for the proportion of older people living in the Hyvinkää Hospital municipalities. Of the 225 patients referred to Peijas Hospital, 168 (75%) were given appointments at the outpatient clinic of surgery and the rest of the referred patients received a teleconsultation. All patients referred to Hyvinkää Hospital were given appointments at the outpatient clinic. The direct costs of an outpatient visit were 45% greater per patient than for a teleconsultation, with a marginal cost decrease of EU48 for every new teleconsultation. A cost-minimization analysis of the alternative interventions showed a net benefit of EU2500 in favour of teleconsultations. The use of videoconferencing between primary and secondary care was modest in orthopaedics, although the use of this telemedicine method was shown to reduce direct costs and be cost-effective.
PubMed ID
11506757 View in PubMed
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A cost-minimization analysis of orthopaedic consultations using videoconferencing in comparison with conventional consulting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68881
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8(5):283-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Arto Ohinmaa
Saija Vuolio
Kari Haukipuro
Ilkka Winblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, University of Oulu, Finland. Arto.Ohinmaa@ualberta.ca
Source
J Telemed Telecare. 2002;8(5):283-9
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Orthopedics - economics
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - economics
Primary Health Care - economics
Remote Consultation - economics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Video Recording - economics
Abstract
We compared the costs of conventional outpatient visits to the surgical department of the University Hospital of Oulu with those of videoconferencing between the primary care centre in Pyhäjärvi and the University Hospital (separated by 160 km). The cost data were obtained from a randomized controlled trial that included 145 first-admission and follow-up orthopaedic patients. In the telemedicine group the annual fixed costs were 6074 in the hospital and 3910 in the primary care centre. The additional variable costs were 2 in the hospital and 19 in primary care. At a workload of 100 patients, the total cost, including travel and indirect costs, was 87.8 per patient in the telemedicine group and 114.0 per patient in the conventional group (i.e. a total cost saving from the use of teleconsultation of 2620). A cost-minimization analysis showed that telemedicine was less costly for society than conventional care at a workload of more than 80 patients per year. If the distance to specialist care were reduced from 160 km to 80 km, the break-even point increased to about 200 patients per year. Wider utilization of the videoconferencing equipment for other purposes, or the use of less expensive videoconferencing equipment, would make services cost saving even at relatively short distances. The study showed that orthopaedic outpatient telecare can be cost minimizing.
PubMed ID
12396857 View in PubMed
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Costs and utilities of manual therapy and orthopedic standard care for low-prioritized orthopedic outpatients of working age: a cost consequence analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260551
Source
Clin J Pain. 2014 Aug;30(8):730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Stina C Lilje
Ulf B Persson
Stine T Tangen
Stine Kåsamoen
Eva Skillgate
Source
Clin J Pain. 2014 Aug;30(8):730-6
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - economics - rehabilitation - surgery
Musculoskeletal Manipulations - economics - methods - utilization
Orthopedics - economics - methods
Outpatients
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Treatment for musculoskeletal disorders in primary care in Sweden is generally initiated with advice and medication. Second-line therapy is physiotherapy and/or injection and radiography; third-line therapy is referral to an orthopedist. Manual therapy is not routine. It is a challenge to identify patients who benefit from treatment by different specialists. The current referral strategy probably contributes to long waiting lists in orthopedic departments, which is costly and implies prolonged suffering for the patients. The aim of this health economic evaluation was to compare costs and outcomes from naprapathic manual therapy (NMT) with orthopedic standard care for common, low-prioritized, nonsurgical musculoskeletal disorders, after second-line treatment.
Diagnose Related Groups were used to define the costs, and the SF-36 was encoded to evaluate the outcomes in cost per quality adjusted life years gained.
Results from a 12 months' follow-up showed significantly larger improvement for the NMT than for orthopedic standard care, significantly lower mean cost per patient; 5427 SEK (*Price level 2009; 1 Euro=106,213 SEK; 1 US Dollar=76,457 SEK) (95% confidence interval, 3693-7161) compared to14298 SEK (95% confidence interval, 8322-20,274), and more gains in outcomes in cost per quality adjusted life years per patient (0.066 compared with 0.026). Thus the result is "dominant."
It is plausible that improved outcomes and reasonable cost savings for low-prioritized nonsurgical outpatients would be attainable if NMT were available as an additional standard care option in orthopedic outpatient clinics.
PubMed ID
24042345 View in PubMed
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Costs of needs for resources in hospital care. A calculation model and applications is some typical cases in orthopaedic surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244891
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1981;9(1):11-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981

Cutting costs: the impact of price lists on the cost development at the emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145933
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2010 Dec;17(6):337-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Ulf Martin Schilling
Author Affiliation
Akutkliniken, Linköpings University Hospital, Universitetssjukhuset, Sweden. mschillingdeu@netscape.net
Source
Eur J Emerg Med. 2010 Dec;17(6):337-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Cost Savings - economics - statistics & numerical data
Efficiency, Organizational - economics - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Laboratories, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
Orthopedics - economics - statistics & numerical data
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
Statistics as Topic
Sweden
Abstract
It was shown that physicians working at the Swedish emergency department (ED) are unaware of the costs for investigations performed. This study evaluated the possible impact of price lists on the overall laboratory and radiology costs at the ED of a Swedish university hospital. Price lists including the most common laboratory analyses and radiological investigations at the ED were created. The lists were distributed to all internal medicine physicians by e-mail and exposed above their working stations continually. No lists were provided for the orthopaedic control group. The average costs for laboratory and radiological investigations during the months of June and July 2007 and 2008 were calculated. Neither clinical nor admission procedures were changed. The physicians were blinded towards the study. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test. A total of 1442 orthopaedic and 1585 medical patients were attended to in 2007. In 2008, 1467 orthopaedic and 1637 medical patients required emergency service. The average costs per patient were 980.27 SKR (98€)/999.41 SKR (100€, +1.95%) for orthopaedic and 1081.36 SKR (108€)/877.3 SKR (88€, -18.8%) for medical patients. Laboratory costs decreased by 9% in orthopaedic and 21.4% in medical patients. Radiology costs changed +5.4% in orthopaedic and -20.59% in medical patients. The distribution and promotion of price lists as a tool at the ED to heighten cost awareness resulted in a major decrease in the investigation costs. A significant decrease in radiological costs could be observed. It can be concluded that price lists are an effective tool to cut costs in public healthcare.
PubMed ID
20093935 View in PubMed
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Decompensation. Avoiding out-of-state workers' compensation problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6299
Source
MGMA Connex. 2002 Apr;2(4):27-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002

[Diagnosis and procedure coding in relation to the DRG system].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186879
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jan 13;165(3):207-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-13-2003
Author
Tine Nymark
Karsten Thomsen
Niels Dieter Röck
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling O, Odense Universitets-hospital, DK-5000 Odense C.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jan 13;165(3):207-9
Date
Jan-13-2003
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Current Procedural Terminology
Denmark
Diagnosis-Related Groups - classification - economics - standards
Diagnostic Errors - economics
Forms and Records Control
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting - classification
Medical Records - classification
Orthopedics - economics - standards
Registries
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Surgery Department, Hospital - economics - standards
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the consequences of missing or wrong diagnoses and procedure codes in relation to the DRG system.
All patients admitted to the orthopaedic department during the course of one week, 155 patients, were consecutively entered. Former diagnoses were registered from interviews with all the patients, former case notes, and present hospital records. They were then compared to the department case notes, including diagnosis and procedure codes. All codes were then compared in Visual DRG (version 97) for grouping.
The coding was correct in 103 of 155 cases (65%). In 52 cases (35%) the coding was incorrect or insufficient, in 18 of the 52 cases (12% overall) it lead to a decrease in the DRG value, which extrapolated on a yearly base, would lead to a loss of DDK 23 million. In total, coding was incorrect or insufficient in one third of the records.
Irrespective of whether the DRG system is implemented or not, it is important that departments register the correct diagnoses and procedures, not only those relevant to the department. There is a continued need to teach and inform the staff about the correct coding procedures.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jan 13;165(3):20512555698
PubMed ID
12555699 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.