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An evaluation of cone-beam computed tomography use in postgraduate orthodontic programs in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138135
Source
J Dent Educ. 2011 Jan;75(1):98-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Bradley R Smith
Jae Hyun Park
Robert A Cederberg
Author Affiliation
Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health, Mesa, AZ 85206, USA.
Source
J Dent Educ. 2011 Jan;75(1):98-106
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cone-Beam Computed Tomography - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Craniofacial Abnormalities - radiography
Education, Dental, Graduate
Humans
Internship and Residency
Orthodontics - education
Questionnaires
Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Radiology - education
Technology, Radiologic - statistics & numerical data
Temporomandibular Joint Disorders - radiography
Tooth, Impacted - radiography
Tooth, Supernumerary - radiography
United States
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in postgraduate orthodontic residency programs. An anonymous electronic survey was sent to the program director/chair of each of the sixty-nine United States and Canadian postgraduate orthodontic programs, with thirty-six (52.2 percent) of these programs responding. Overall, 83.3 percent of programs reported having access to a CBCT scanner, while 73.3 percent reported regular usage. The vast majority (81.8 percent) used CBCT mainly for specific diagnostic purposes, while 18.2 percent (n=4) used CBCT as a diagnostic tool for every patient. Orthodontic residents received both didactic and practical (hands-on) training or solely didactic training in 59.1 percent and 31.8 percent of programs, respectively. Operation of the CBCT scanner was the responsibility of radiology technicians (54.4 percent), both radiology technicians and orthodontic residents (31.8 percent), and orthodontic residents alone (13.6 percent). Interpretation of CBCT results was the responsibility of a radiologist in 59.1 percent of programs, while residents were responsible for reading and referring abnormal findings in 31.8 percent of programs. Overall, postgraduate orthodontic program CBCT accessibility, usage, training, and interpretation were consistent in Eastern and Western regions, and most CBCT use was for specific diagnostic purposes of impacted/supernumerary teeth, craniofacial anomalies, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders.
PubMed ID
21205734 View in PubMed
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Assessment of graduate orthodontic programs in North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114817
Source
J Dent Educ. 2013 Apr;77(4):463-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Thomas Burk
Maria Orellana
Author Affiliation
Department of Orofacial Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California, San Francisco, 707 Parnassus Avenue, D-1011, Box 0438, San Francisco, CA 94143-0438l, USA. maria.orellana@ucsf.edu
Source
J Dent Educ. 2013 Apr;77(4):463-75
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Curriculum
Education, Dental, Graduate - standards
Faculty, Dental - supply & distribution
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Orthodontics - education
Questionnaires
Students, Dental - statistics & numerical data
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
This study collected information on four main aspects of U.S. and Canadian orthodontic programs: demographic profiles of residents, requirements for graduation, graduate curriculum, and number of faculty and staff members. Program directors at seventy U.S. and Canadian orthodontic programs were invited to participate in a twenty-question survey and to distribute a ten-question survey to their residents. Twenty program directors and eighty-four residents completed the anonymous, online surveys on Qualtrics.com in July-August 2010. The average age of surveyed residents was 29.6 years of age; 73 percent were non-Hispanic white, with 14 percent Asian/Asian-American, 5 percent Hispanic, and 1 percent African American. A small percentage of residents (13 percent) were foreign-trained. The majority of residents (64 percent) were male. There was a wide variety of clinical and didactic requirements in the programs. Almost all programs emphasized treatment with functional appliances and clear aligners. An average of three full-time and ten part-time faculty members were dedicated to each residency program. This survey reveals a potential shortage of minority orthodontic residents currently being trained in orthodontic programs, in addition to several commonalities and differences among the programs' curricula, graduation requirements, and numbers of faculty and staff members. This preliminary survey will hopefully inspire measures to address the discrepancies revealed, particularly the lack of minority students and full-time faculty members.
PubMed ID
23576592 View in PubMed
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Assessment of objectives of post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195753
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
J B Epstein
A. Tejani
P. Glassman
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, Vancouver Hospital & Health Sciences Centre, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada.
Source
Spec Care Dentist. 2000 Sep-Oct;20(5):191-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Dental
Canada
Clinical Competence
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dental Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Education, Dental, Graduate - organization & administration
Emergency Medicine - education
Endodontics - education
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Oral Medicine - education
Organizational Objectives
Orthodontics - education
Pathology, Oral - education
Pediatric Dentistry - education
Periodontics - education
Pharmacology - education
Practice Management, Dental
Preventive Dentistry - education
Primary Health Care
Prosthodontics - education
Public Health Dentistry - education
Questionnaires
Surgery, Oral - education
United States
Abstract
Objectives of hospital-based post-doctoral general dentistry programs in Canada were assessed by questionnaire. Seventy percent (14 of 20) of the program directors responded. Educational goals and objectives were assessed in professional skills and practice management, public health and preventive dentistry, oral medicine and pathology, special needs patient care, trauma and emergency care, restorative/prosthodontic care, endodontics, orthodontics/pediatric dentistry, oral surgery, periodontics, pharmacology, and functioning in a hospital. High rankings of proficiency were related to primary care, restorative/prosthodontic, endodontic, and surgical care. Emergency care, sedation, and pharmacology were also ranked highly. Lower rankings of proficiency were reported in orthodontics, aspects of public health dentistry, practice management, and advanced oral and maxiliofacial surgery. When the results of the Canadian survey were compared with those of a survey of US post-doctoral general dentistry programs, substantial similarity was seen. The findings support continuing reciprocity in accreditation standards between the Canadian and American Commissions on Dental Education and Dental Accreditation.
PubMed ID
11203897 View in PubMed
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Black, white, or gray: finding commonality on how orthodontists describe the areas between Angle's molar classifications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161493
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Sep;132(3):302-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Randall Snyder
Laurance Jerrold
Author Affiliation
jlscal99@yahoo.com
Source
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Sep;132(3):302-6
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Malocclusion - classification
Orthodontics - education
Puerto Rico
Questionnaires
Terminology as Topic
United States
Abstract
Angle's system for classifying molar relationships has been the standard in orthodontics for over a century. The purpose of this study was to determine what orthodontic students are being taught about the terminology of molar relationships and the use of Angle's molar classification system.
An e-mail survey was sent to the department chair or the program director of every orthodontic program in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico (n = 80). The survey included photos of models placed into 1/4 cusp, 1/2 cusp, and 3/4 cusp distal occlusions, and the participants were asked to classify them by selecting from a list of terms or writing 1 of their own. They were also asked whether they thought that the Angle molar classification was adequate for communication and diagnosis.
Forty surveys were completed and returned. The results showed that a variety of terminology is being taught, and most educators do not use Angle's system as he defined it. About half of the respondents were dissatisfied with the Angle molar classification system.
A modification of Angle's system that is more descriptive is needed.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Dec;132(6):716-718068567
Comment In: Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Dec;132(6):71718068569
Comment In: Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2008 Mar;133(3):33618331923
PubMed ID
17826597 View in PubMed
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Changes in orthodontic care patterns in a predoctoral children's dentistry clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159697
Source
J Dent Educ. 2007 Dec;71(12):1549-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Stanley A Alexander
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, One Kneeland Street, Boston, MA 02111, USA. stanley.alexander@tufts.edu
Source
J Dent Educ. 2007 Dec;71(12):1549-53
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Clinical Competence
Dental Care for Children - manpower
Dental Clinics - manpower
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Education, Dental, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Faculty, Dental - statistics & numerical data
General Practice, Dental - education
Humans
Manitoba
Organizational Innovation
Orthodontic Appliances - statistics & numerical data
Orthodontics - education
Orthodontics, Corrective - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the changes in orthodontic care patterns over a sixteen-year period in a university clinical setting. The average numbers of students, clinical procedures, and orthodontic appliances were examined from the time period 1988-2003. Appliance number and type were evaluated as a function of increased predoctoral and postdoctoral class sizes, student to faculty ratios, and decreased operating budgets for faculty recruitment. For the period 1988-98, the insertion of orthodontic appliances by dental students remained constant. A permanent increase in the predoctoral class size occurred in 1996 without an increase in faculty support, contributing to a decline in appliance insertions by students from 1999 to 2003. This time period also saw major increases in the postdoctoral class size and a reorganization of the clinical facility that then began to require the pairing of dental students to provide comprehensive care, thus decreasing their clinical exposure to the care of children. The overall clinical experience at the predoctoral level in orthodontic procedures declined, which resulted in a change in clinical requirements and new methods to ensure clinical competency.
PubMed ID
18096880 View in PubMed
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[Chief dental officers' education in Jönköping II].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251148
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1976 Apr 15;68(8):466-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1976
Author
K. Eliasson
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1976 Apr 15;68(8):466-8
Date
Apr-15-1976
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Dental, Graduate
Humans
Maxillofacial Injuries - therapy
Orthodontics - education
Pediatric Dentistry - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
149387 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of orthodontic services in England and Wales, the Netherlands and Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241483
Source
Eur J Orthod. 1983 Nov;5(4):295-305
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1983
Source
Br Dent J. 1990 Jan 20;168(2):78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1990
Author
J. Roberts
Source
Br Dent J. 1990 Jan 20;168(2):78
Date
Jan-20-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Clinical Clerkship
Dental Care for Disabled
Education, Dental
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Humans
Ontario
Orthodontics - education
Abstract
Electives are an excellent opportunity to observe dentistry in another country. I chose Toronto in Canada, as it has always struck me as a very modern city and I was particularly interested in observing their recent advances in surgical orthodontics, which I find enthralling. I was aware that Toronto had a large, efficient orthodontic department which was invaluable for my project. I am also interested in the treatment of immunocompromised patients and hoped to visit the new AIDS clinic there.
Notes
Comment In: Br Dent J. 1990 Feb 24;168(4):1402310633
PubMed ID
2137004 View in PubMed
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Future provision of orthodontic care for patients with craniofacial anomalies and cleft lip and palate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140415
Source
World J Orthod. 2010;11(3):269-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
James Noble
Nicholas Karaiskos
William A Wiltshire
Author Affiliation
Bloorview Kids Rehab Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. drjamesnoble@gmail.com
Source
World J Orthod. 2010;11(3):269-72
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Cleft Lip - therapy
Cleft Palate - therapy
Craniofacial Abnormalities - therapy
Dentist's Practice Patterns
Forecasting
Humans
Internship and Residency
Orthodontics - education
Orthodontics, Corrective - trends
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
To determine whether Canadian and United States (US) orthodontic programs provide training in treating patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) and craniofacial anomalies (CFA) and whether residents will treat these patients in their future practices.
An email with a personalized link to an anonymous, multi-item, online questionnaire was sent to all 54 Canadian and 335 of the approximately 700 US orthodontic residents. The two questions asked were: "Do you plan to include the treatment of CLP and CFA patients in your practice?" and "Does your program contain formal training in treating patients with CLP and CFA?"
A total of 44 Canadian and 136 US residents responded. In Canada, 30% plan to treat patients with CLP and CFA after graduation, 14% said no, 48% said maybe, and 9% were unsure. In the US, 53% said yes, 7% said no, 36% said maybe, and 4% were unsure. When asked if their program offers formal training in the treatment of these patients, 45% of Canadian residents said yes, 34% said no, and 20% were unsure, whereas 82% of US residents said yes, 12% said no, and 5% were unsure.
Most programs in the US and approximately half in Canada provide training in CLP and CFA, and more than half of US and almost one-third of Canadian residents plan to be involved in the care of patients with CLP and CFA, which is considerably less than those receiving training. Orthodontic programs need to increase the number of postgraduate students who are interested in providing care to CLP and CFA patients after becoming orthodontists.
PubMed ID
20877737 View in PubMed
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Inter-examiner variability in orthodontic treatment decisions for Danish children with 'borderline' treatment need.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137741
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2012 Apr;34(2):250-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
V. Baelum
E. Borchorst
H. Buch
P. Dømgaard
L E Hartig
Author Affiliation
School of Dentistry, Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK 8000 Aarhus. baelum@soci.au.dk
Source
Eur J Orthod. 2012 Apr;34(2):250-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Decision Making
Denmark
Dental Models
Female
Humans
Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need - statistics & numerical data
Male
Malocclusion - classification - therapy
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Observer Variation
Orthodontics - education - statistics & numerical data
Orthodontics, Corrective - statistics & numerical data
Photography, Dental
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Schools, Dental
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
This study explored the variation between examiners in the orthodontic treatment need assessments of fifth-grade children with a borderline orthodontic treatment need. Each of three groups of children with borderline treatment need (n = 18, 19, and 19, respectively) were examined by one of three groups of orthodontists (33 in each group), whereby each of 56 children had 33 orthodontic treatment need assessments based on a clinical examination. This treatment need determination exercise was subsequently repeated with treatment need determined based on study casts and extraoral photographs. The proportion of positive treatment decisions based on the clinical examination was 49.3, 49.6, and 52.5 per cent, respectively, and 45.7, 46.3, and 50.5 per cent, based on the model assessments. There was a considerable disagreement between examiners in the treatment need assessments, whether assessments were based on a clinical examination or on a model-based case presentation. The average percentage agreement between two orthodontists for the treatment need based on clinical examination was 69, 66, and 61, respectively, corresponding to mean kappa values of 0.38, 0.32, and 0.22. When the model-based assessments were considered, the average percentage agreement between two orthodontists was 62, 58, and 69, respectively, corresponding to mean kappa values of 0.25, 0.16, and 0.37. Linear regression analysis of the orthodontists' treatment propensity as a function of their gender, place of education, years of orthodontic treatment experience, type of workplace, and place of work showed that only the orthodontic experience was influential for the model-based treatment propensity [ß = 0.34 per cent/year (95 per cent confidence interval = 0.01-0.66)].
PubMed ID
21252189 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.