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Accumulation of organotin compounds and mercury in harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) from the Danish waters and West Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70531
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Nov 1;350(1-3):59-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2005
Author
Jakob Strand
Martin M Larsen
Christina Lockyer
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Marine Ecology, P.O. Box 358, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. jak@dmu.dk
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2005 Nov 1;350(1-3):59-71
Date
Nov-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Environmental monitoring
Female
Greenland
Liver - chemistry - metabolism
Male
Mercury - analysis - metabolism
Organotin Compounds - analysis - metabolism
Phocoena - metabolism
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Zinc - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
The concentrations of butyltin (summation operatorBT=TBT+DBT+MBT) and mercury (Hg) were determined in the liver of 35 harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), which were found dead along the coastlines or caught as by-catch in the Danish North Sea and the Inner Danish waters. In addition, three harbour porpoises hunted in West Greenland were analysed. High levels of butyltin and mercury, within the range of 68-4605 mg BT/kg ww and 0.22-92 mg Hg/kg ww, were found in the liver of the Danish harbour porpoises and both substances tend to accumulate with age. The levels in the harbour porpoise from West Greenland were 2.0-18 mg BT/kg ww and 6.3-6.9 mg Hg/kg ww, respectively. The concentrations of butyltin and mercury were both found to be higher in stranded than in by-caught harbour porpoises but only the butyltin concentration was significantly higher in stranded porpoises in the age group 1-5 years. These substances are suspected of inducing adverse effects on immune and endocrine systems in mammals and they may thereby pose a threat to the animals. This study suggests that organotin compounds are also important, when assessing the risks of contaminants on the health and viability of harbour porpoises in Danish waters.
PubMed ID
16227073 View in PubMed
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Contamination status and accumulation profiles of organotins in sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86043
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2008 Apr;56(4):641-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Murata Satoko
Takahashi Shin
Agusa Tetsuro
Thomas Nancy J
Kannan Kurunthachalam
Tanabe Shinsuke
Author Affiliation
Center for Marine Environmental Studies, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577, Japan.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2008 Apr;56(4):641-9
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
California
Communicable diseases
Environmental Exposure
Liver - chemistry
Organotin Compounds - analysis - metabolism
Otters - metabolism
Risk assessment
Russia
Time Factors
Washington
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Organotin compounds (OTs) including mono- to tri-butyltins, -phenyltins, and -octyltins were determined in the liver of adult sea otters (Enhydra lutris) found dead along the coasts of California, Washington, and Alaska in the USA and Kamchatka, Russia. Total concentrations of OTs in sea otters from California ranged from 34 to 4100ng/g on a wet weight basis. The order of concentrations of OTs in sea otters was total butyltins>total octyltins> or = total phenyltins. Elevated concentrations of butyltins (BTs) were found in some otters classified under 'infectious-disease' mortality category. Concentrations of BTs in few of these otters were close to or above the threshold levels for adverse health effects. Total butyltin concentrations decreased significantly in the livers of California sea otters since the 1990s. Based on the concentrations of organotins in sea otters collected from 1992 to 2002, the half-lives of tributyltin and total butyltins in sea otters were estimated to be approximately three years.
PubMed ID
18304586 View in PubMed
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Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142641
Source
Environ Res. 2010 Aug;110(6):544-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Riikka Airaksinen
Panu Rantakokko
Anu W Turunen
Terttu Vartiainen
Pekka J Vuorinen
Antti Lappalainen
Aune Vihervuori
Jaakko Mannio
Anja Hallikainen
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, FI-70701 Kuopio, Finland. Riikka.Airaksinen@thl.fi
Source
Environ Res. 2010 Aug;110(6):544-7
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Demography
Eating
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Fishes - metabolism
Food Contamination
Humans
Organotin Compounds - analysis - metabolism
Seafood - statistics & numerical data
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption.
The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population.
An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) (SigmaOTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates.
The average daily intake of SigmaOTCs through fish consumption was 3.2ng/kgbwday(-1), which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250ng/kgbwday(-1) set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the SigmaOTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout.
The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.
PubMed ID
20573344 View in PubMed
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