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466 records – page 1 of 47.

Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Jan 1;128(1):57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1983
Author
Normand Da Sylva
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Jan 1;128(1):57
Date
Jan-1-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Attitude
Canada
Data Collection
Humans
Organizational Policy
Physicians
Societies
PubMed ID
11643997 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abuse policies for healthcare institutions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211295
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1996 Sep-Oct;5(5):36-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Kohm
M J McNally
J. Tiivel
Author Affiliation
Toronto Hospital.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1996 Sep-Oct;5(5):36-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Domestic Violence
Elder Abuse - diagnosis - therapy
Female
Hospitals
Humans
Male
Ontario
Organizational Policy
Abstract
Few hospitals have standard approaches to recognizing and treating victims of abuse. When staff at the Toronto Hospital realized they had no guidelines for handling such cases, they formed a task force to research the issue. The result was a set of policies and procedures which clearly outline the duties of staff who suspect abuse and, at the same time, make clear the hospital's role in addressing this serious issue.
PubMed ID
10161457 View in PubMed
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Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
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Access to adult liver transplantation in Canada: a survey and ethical analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212821
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 1;154(3):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1996
Author
M A Mullen
N. Kohut
M. Sam
L. Blendis
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 1;154(3):337-42
Date
Feb-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Data Collection
Health Care Rationing - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Liver Transplantation
Organizational Policy
Patient Selection
Resource Allocation
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To describe the substantive and procedural criteria used for placing patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation and for allocating available livers to patients on the waiting list; to identify principal decision-makers and the main factors limiting liver transplantation in Canada; and to examine how closely cadaveric liver allocation resembles theoretic models of source allocation.
Mailed survey.
Medical directors of all seven Canadian adult liver transplantation centres, or their designates. Six of the questionnaires were completed.
Relative importance of substantive and procedural criteria used to place patients in the waiting list for liver transplantation and to allocate available livers. Identification of principal decision-makers and main limiting factors to adult liver transplantation.
Alcoholism, drug addiction, HIV positivity, primary liver cancer, noncompliance and hepatitis B were the most important criteria that had a negative influence on decisions to place patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. Severity of disease and urgency were the most important criteria used for selecting patients on the waiting list for transplantation. Criteria that were inconsistent across the centres included social support (for deciding who is placed on the waiting list) and length of time on the waiting list (for deciding who is selected from the list). Although a variety of people were reported as being involved in these decisions, virtually all were reported to be health to be health care professionals. Thirty-seven patients died while waiting for liver transplantation in 1991; the scarcity of cadaveric livers was the main limiting factor.
Criteria for resource allocation decisions regarding liver transplantation are generally consistent among the centres across Canada, although some important inconsistencies remain. Because patients die while on the waiting list and because the primary limiting factor is organ supply, increased organ acquisition efforts are needed.
Notes
Cites: Psychosomatics. 1993 Jul-Aug;34(4):314-238351306
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1990 Mar;150(3):523-72178581
Cites: BMJ. 1990 Jul 7;301(6742):15-72383700
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Oct 24;325(17):1243-61845039
PubMed ID
8564903 View in PubMed
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Achieving closure through disclosure: experience in a pediatric institution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180246
Source
J Pediatr. 2004 May;144(5):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004

Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: the Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146049
Source
Addiction. 2010 Feb;105(2):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Tim Stockwell
Dan Reist
Scott Macdonald
Cecilia Benoit
Mikael Jansson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia, University of Victoria, BC, Canada.
Source
Addiction. 2010 Feb;105(2):207-15
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - economics - organization & administration
British Columbia
Creativity
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Development - economics - methods
Staff Development
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders
Abstract
The Centre for Addictions Research of British Columbia (CARBC) was established as a multi-campus and multi-disciplinary research centre administered by the University of Victoria (UVic) in late 2003. Its core funding is provided from interest payments on an endowment of CAD 10.55 million dollars. It is supported by a commitment to seven faculty appointments in various departments at UVic. The Centre has two offices, an administration and research office in Victoria and a knowledge exchange unit in Vancouver. The two offices are collaborating on the implementation of CARBC's first 5-year plan which seeks to build capacity in British Columbia for integrated multi-disciplinary research and knowledge exchange in the areas substance use, addictions and harm reduction. Present challenges include losses to the endowment caused by the 2008/2009 economic crisis and difficulties negotiating faculty positions with the university administration. Despite these hurdles, to date each year has seen increased capacity for the Centre in terms of affiliated scientists, funding and staffing as well as output in terms of published reports, electronic resources and impacts on policy and practice. Areas of special research interest include: drug testing in the work-place, epidemiological monitoring, substance use and injury, pricing and taxation policies, privatization of liquor monopolies, polysubstance use, health determinants of indigenous peoples, street-involved youth and other vulnerable populations at risk of substance use problems. Further information about the Centre and its activities can be found on http://www.carbc.ca.
PubMed ID
20078479 View in PubMed
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Addressing tobacco dependence in psychiatric practice: promises and pitfalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150295
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;54(6):353-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Tony P George
Douglas M Ziedonis
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;54(6):353-5
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Health promotion
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Organizational Policy
Public Policy
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Notes
Comment In: Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Dec;54(12):854-5; author reply 855-620063440
Comment On: Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;54(6):368-7819527557
Comment On: Can J Psychiatry. 2009 Jun;54(6):356-6719527556
PubMed ID
19527555 View in PubMed
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Adolescent smoking: effect of school and community characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139245
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Chris Y Lovato
Cornelia Zeisser
H Sharon Campbell
Allison W Watts
Peter Halpin
Mary Thompson
John Eyles
Edward Adlaf
K Stephen Brown
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. chris.lovato@ubc.ca
Source
Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):507-14
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Organizational Policy
Residence Characteristics
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Students - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A substantial challenge in addressing adolescent tobacco use is that smoking behaviors occur in complex environments that involve the school setting and larger community context.
This study provides an integrated description of factors from the school and community environment that affect youth smoking and explains variation in individual smoking behaviors both within and across schools/communities.
Data were collected from 82 randomly sampled secondary schools in five Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, Newfoundland, and Labrador) during the 2003-2004 school year. Cross-sectional data were obtained from students; school administrators (school-based tobacco control policies and programs); and from observations in the community. In 2009, hierarchic logistic regression was used to model the role of individual, school, and community variables in predicting student smoking outcomes.
Students who attended a school with a focus on tobacco prevention (OR=0.87, 95% CI=0.81, 0.94) and stronger policies prohibiting tobacco use (OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.88, 0.97) were less likely to smoke than students who attended a school without these characteristics. A student was more likely to smoke if a greater number of students smoked on the school periphery (OR=1.25, 95% CI=1.07, 1.47). Within the community, price per cigarette (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.84, 0.99) and immigrants (OR=0.99, 95% CI=0.98, 0.99) were inversely related to students' smoking status.
The results suggest that school and community characteristics account for variation in smoking levels across schools. Based on the current findings, the ideal school setting that supports low student smoking levels is located in a neighborhood where the cost of cigarettes is high, provides tobacco prevention education, and has a policy prohibiting smoking.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):609-1021084083
PubMed ID
21084070 View in PubMed
Less detail

466 records – page 1 of 47.