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749 records – page 1 of 75.

A 6-hour working day--effects on health and well-being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71230
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
T. Akerstedt
B. Olsson
M. Ingre
M. Holmgren
G. Kecklund
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Hum Ergol (Tokyo). 2001 Dec;30(1-2):197-202
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - organization & administration
Quality of Life - psychology
Sweden
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The effect of the total amount of work hours and the benefits of a shortening is frequently debated, but very little data is available. The present study compared a group (N = 41) that obtained a 9 h reduction of the working week (to a 6 h day) with a comparison group (N = 22) that retained normal work hours. Both groups were constituted of mainly female health care and day care nursery personnel. The experimental group retained full pay and extra personnel were employed to compensate for loss of hours. Questionnaire data were obtained before and 1 year after the change. The data were analyzed using a two-factor ANOVA with the interaction term year*group as the main focus. The results showed a significant interaction of year*group for social factors, sleep quality, mental fatigue, and heart/respiratory complaints, and attitude to work hours. In all cases the experimental group improved whereas the control group did not change. It was concluded that shortened work hours have clear social effects and moderate effects on well-being.
PubMed ID
14564882 View in PubMed
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The 1996 Helene Hudson Memorial Lecture. Work redesign and re-engineering: a challenge for professional nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206735
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1997 Nov;7(4):198-201, 204-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
L. Vincent
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1997 Nov;7(4):198-201, 204-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Hospital Restructuring - organization & administration
Humans
Oncology Nursing - education - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Abstract
Work redesign and re-engineering have become the buzzwords of the 1990s as all sectors of the health care arena struggle to meet the demands of patient care while coping with increasing fiscal constraint. Redesign and re-engineering are terms that describe a wide range of strategies in health care and radically different models of care delivery. These new approaches to care are shifting the way we view care delivery and how it is structured. This paper describes the principles of redesign and re-engineering, common applications in health care organizations, outcomes and evaluation. Multiskilling and use of genetic health care workers are addressed. The potential impact on the practice of oncology nurses is explored as well as strategies to meet the challenges of today's health care environment.
PubMed ID
9450417 View in PubMed
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Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
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Achieving environmental excellence through a multidisciplinary grassroots movement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146381
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2010;23(4):144-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bryan Herechuk
Carolyn Gosse
John N Woods
Author Affiliation
Quality Planning & Performance Improvement Program, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. bherechu@stjoes.ca
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2010;23(4):144-55
Date
2010
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - organization & administration
Conservation of Natural Resources
Humans
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Social Responsibility
Abstract
St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton (SJHH) supports a grassroots green team, called Environmental Vision and Action (EVA). Since the creation of EVA, a healthy balance between corporate projects led by corporate leaders and grassroots initiatives led by informal leaders has resulted in many successful environmental initiatives. Over a relatively short period of time, environmental successes at SJHH have included waste diversion programs, energy efficiency and reduction initiatives, alternative commuting programs, green purchasing practices, clinical and pharmacy greening and increased staff engagement and awareness. Knowledge of social movements theory helped EVA leaders to understand the internal processes of a grassroots movement and helped to guide it. Social movements theory may also have broader applicability in health care by understanding the passionate engagement that people bring to a common cause and how to evolve sources of opposition into engines for positive change. After early successes, as the limitations of a grassroots movement began to surface, the EVA team revived the concept of evolving the grassroots green program into a corporate program for environmental stewardship. It is hard to quantify the importance of allowing our staff, physicians, volunteers and patients to engage in changes that they feel passionately about. However, at SJHH, the transformation of a group of people unsatisfied with the organization's environmental performance into an 'engine for change' has led to a rapid improvement in environmental stewardship at SJHH that is now regarded as a success.
PubMed ID
21739814 View in PubMed
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[Activity of military medical service in developing of rehabilitation system of invalids on account of military actions and battle trauma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161057
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2007 Jul;328(7):10-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007

Acute care has an innovative approach to the bed crisis!

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199854
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1999;12(3):54-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
D. Goulard
C. Simpson
Author Affiliation
Patient Transition Services, Peter Lougheed Centre, Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1999;12(3):54-6
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alberta
Bed Occupancy
Health Facility Closure
Hospital Restructuring
Humans
National Health Programs
Organizational Innovation
Patient Discharge
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
The regionalization of healthcare in Alberta has been instrumental in changing the way we deliver healthcare to the population. In Calgary, the restructuring involved the closing of three acute care hospitals and a significant reduction in beds per capita. This reduction in inpatient beds behooved Senior Management in acute care to be innovative and responsive to the utilization of existing resources. The Department of Patient Transition Services was conceived with a mandate to provide assistance and support in utilization management and discharge planning, administrative coordination, system support and integration support. The evolution of this unique department is described.
PubMed ID
10623171 View in PubMed
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Acute care hospital strategic priorities: perceptions of challenges, control, competition and collaboration in Ontario's evolving healthcare system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173511
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Adalsteinn D Brown
L Miin Alikhan
Guillermo A Sandoval
Neil Seeman
G Ross Baker
George H Pink
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto.
Source
Healthc Q. 2005;8(3):36-47
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - psychology
Cooperative Behavior
Economic Competition
Health Care Surveys
Health Priorities
Hospital Planning - economics - trends
Humans
National Health Programs - trends
Ontario
Organizational Innovation
Abstract
To explore the current and pending strategic agenda of Ontario hospitals (the largest consumers of the provincial healthcare budget), a survey of Ontario acute care hospital CEOs was conducted in January 2004. The survey, with an 82% response rate, identifies 29 strategic priorities under seven key strategic themes consistent across different hospital types. These themes include (1) human resources cultivation, (2) service integration and partnerships, (3) consumer engagement, (4) corporate governance and management, (5) organizational efficiency and redesign, (6) improved information use for decision-making, (7) patient care management. The extent to which an individual hospital's control over strategic resolutions is perceived may affect multilevel strategic priority-setting and action-planning. In addition to supporting ongoing development of meaningful performance measures and information critical to strategic decision-making, this study's findings may facilitate a better understanding of hospitals' key resource commitments, the extent of competition and collaboration for key resources, the perceived degree of individual control over strategic issue resolution and where systemic resolutions may be required.
PubMed ID
16078398 View in PubMed
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The administrative support team: specialized support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200818
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1999 Sep;29(9):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
D B Leitch
Author Affiliation
Red Deer Regional Hospital Centre, Alberta, Canada. dleitch@dthr.ab.ca
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1999 Sep;29(9):9-11
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Hospital Units - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Nurse Administrators - organization & administration
Nursing Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Abstract
Specialization has enabled one person to develop a high level of expertise in one management function. The entire department of nursing, not just one unit, shares the benefits of this expertise. The result is efficient and effective use of resources. The lateral relationship between the administrative support team and clinical manager teams has promoted communication flow and exchange while keeping the decision-making power at the clinical level. The implementation of the administrative support team has provided the right solution to the problem: specialized support.
PubMed ID
10491663 View in PubMed
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749 records – page 1 of 75.