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Cultural competence plans: A strategy for the creation of a culturally competent system of care

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102405
Source
Chapter 2, Promoting cultural competence in children's mental health services. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1998
Author
Bernard, JA
Source
Chapter 2, Promoting cultural competence in children's mental health services. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cultural competence
Leadership
Management
Organizational Culture
Plan development
Training
Abstract
Since the publication of "Towards a Culturally Competent System of Care" (1989), dozens of books and training materials on cultural competence and its sister field in the private sector, managing diversity, have been published. Yet, despite the consistent call for commitment to a long-term developmental process, organizations too often maintain the simplistic view, if they express any at all, that recruitment of bilingual and bicultural service providers and training in culturally related topics alone will lead to a culturally competent organization.
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Leadership, organization and health at work: a case study of a Swedish industrial company.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85801
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Jun;23(2):127-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Eriksson Andrea
Jansson Bjarne
Haglund Bo J A
Axelsson Runo
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, P.O. Box 12133, SE-402 42 Göteborg, Sweden. andrea@nhv.se
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Jun;23(2):127-33
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Leadership
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Culture
Sweden
Abstract
The application of knowledge on organization and leadership is important for the promotion of health at workplace. The purpose of this article is to analyse the leadership and organization, including the organizational culture, of a Swedish industrial company in relation to the health of the employees. The leadership in this company has been oriented towards developing and actively promoting a culture and a structure of organization where the employees have a high degree of control over their work situation. According to the employees, this means extensive possibilities for personal development and responsibility, as well as good companionship, which makes them feel well at work. This is also supported by the low sickness rate of the company. The results indicate that the leadership and organization of this company may have been conducive to the health of the employees interviewed. However, the culture of personal responsibility and the structure of self-managed teams seemed to suit only those who were able to manage the demands of the company and adapt to that kind of organization. Therefore, the findings indicate that the specific context of the technology, the environment and the professional level of the employees need to be taken into consideration when analysing the relation between leadership, organization and health at work.
PubMed ID
18344562 View in PubMed
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Healthcare culture and the challenge of preventing healthcare-associated infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139966
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:116-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Michael Gardam
Paige Reason
Liz Rykert
Author Affiliation
Ontario Agency for Health Protection & Promotion, University Health Network, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto.
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:116-20
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Humans
Organizational Culture
Safety Management - methods
Abstract
Consider the following story: A patient in a teaching hospital is about to be examined by a resident physician. When asked by the patient to wash his hands, the resident refuses, saying he has done so recently. The staff physician then enters the room and the patient speaks of his disappointment regarding the actions of the resident. The staff physician is displeased and states that the patient should not be mistrusting his physicians. Later, when booking his follow-up appointment, the patient asks not to be seen by the resident. The staff physician overhears and, in front of other patients, angrily tells the patient not to return to his clinic because of his disruptive behaviour.
PubMed ID
20959740 View in PubMed
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Organization, relational justice and absenteeism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265996
Source
Work. 2014;47(4):521-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ulrich Stoetzer
Carl Åborg
Gun Johansson
Magnus Svartengren
Source
Work. 2014;47(4):521-9
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Leadership
Organizational Culture
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
There is a need for more knowledge on how to manage companies towards healthier and more prosperous organizations with low levels of absenteeism. Relational Justice can be a useful concept when managing such organizations.
Organizational factors can help to explain why some companies have relatively low absenteeism rates, even though they are equal to other companies in many other aspects. Previous studies suggest that management may be one important factor. Efficient management may depend on good relations between the leaders and the employees. The concept of Relational Justice is designed to capture these relations. Consequently, a Relational Justice framework may be used to understand why some companies have a low incidence of absenteeism.
Managers from a representative body of Swedish companies.
Interviews were analyzed to explore whether the items representing the concept of Relational Justice can be used to further understand the strategies, procedures and structures that characterize organizations and management in companies with a low incidence of absenteeism.
Strategies, procedures or principles related to Relational Justice were common and highlighted in companies with an incidence of absenteeism. The most frequently occurring factors were; to be treated with kindness and consideration, personal viewpoint considered and to be treated impartially.
The results suggested that a Relational Justice framework could be used to increase understanding of the organizational and managerial factors typical for companies with a low incidence of absenteeism. A Relational Justice approach to organizational management may be used to successfully lower absenteeism, change organizations and promote healthy and prosperous companies.
PubMed ID
23531587 View in PubMed
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Dimensions of patient safety culture in family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139965
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Luz Palacios-Derflingher
Maeve O'Beirne
Pam Sterling
Karen Zwicker
Brianne K Harding
Ann Casebeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary.
Source
Healthc Q. 2010;13 Spec No:121-7
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family Practice
Humans
Medical Errors - prevention & control
Organizational Culture
Safety Management
Abstract
Safety culture has been shown to affect patient safety in healthcare. While the United States and United Kingdom have studied the dimensions that reflect patient safety culture in family practice settings, to date, this has not been done in Canada. Differences in the healthcare systems between these countries and Canada may affect the dimensions found to be relevant here. Thus, it is important to identify and compare the dimensions from the United States and the United Kingdom in a Canadian context. The objectives of this study were to explore the dimensions of patient safety culture that relate to family practice in Canada and to determine if differences and similarities exist between dimensions found in Canada and those found in previous studies undertaken in the United States and the United Kingdom. A qualitative study was undertaken applying thematic analysis using focus groups with family practice offices and supplementary key stakeholders. Analysis of the data indicated that most of the dimensions from the United States and United Kingdom are appropriate in our Canadian context. Exceptions included owner/managing partner/leadership support for patient safety, job satisfaction and overall perceptions of patient safety and quality. Two unique dimensions were identified in the Canadian context: disclosure and accepting responsibility for errors. Based on this early work, it is important to consider differences in care settings when understanding dimensions of patient safety culture. We suggest that additional research in family practice settings is critical to further understand the influence of context on patient safety culture.
PubMed ID
20959741 View in PubMed
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Nursing education: a catalyst for the patient safety movement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156555
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(3 Spec No.):35-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Kim Neudorf
Netha Dyck
Darlene Scott
Diana Davidson Dick
Author Affiliation
Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) Nursing Division Clinical Placement Project, Prince Albert, Saskatchewan.
Source
Healthc Q. 2008;11(3 Spec No.):35-9
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Culture
Safety Management - organization & administration - standards
Saskatchewan
Abstract
Creating a culture of safety in healthcare systems is a goal of leaders in the patient safety movement. Commitment of leadership to safety in the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) Nursing Division has resulted in the development of the Patient Safety Project Team (PSPT) and a steady shift in the culture of the organization toward a systems approach to patient safety. Graduates prepared with the competencies necessary to be diligent about their practice and skilled in determining the root causes of system error in healthcare will become leaders in shifting the healthcare culture to strengthen patient safety. The PSPT believes this cultural shift begins with the education system. It involves modifications to curricula content, facilitation of multidisciplinary processes, and inclusion of theory and practice that reflect critical inquiry into healthcare and nursing education systems to ensure patient safety. In this paper the practical approaches and initiatives of the PSPT are reviewed. The integration of Patient Safety Core Curriculum modules for competency development is described. The policy for reporting adverse events and near misses is outlined. In addition, the student-focused reporting tool, the results and the implications for teaching in the clinical setting are discussed. Processes used to engage faculty are also addressed.
PubMed ID
18382159 View in PubMed
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["There is no educational culture of in health care"].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257532
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Jun 11-17;111(24):1071
Publication Type
Article

Beyond curriculum: embedding interprofessional collaboration into academic culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141244
Source
J Interprof Care. 2011 Jan;25(1):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Karim Bandali
Bradley Niblett
Timothy Pok Chi Yeung
Paul Gamble
Author Affiliation
The Michener Institute for Applied Health Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1V4 Canada. kbandali@michener.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2011 Jan;25(1):75-6
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Organizational Culture
Social Work - education
PubMed ID
20795824 View in PubMed
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Patient safety culture in acute care: a web-based survey of nurse managers' and registered nurses' views in four Finnish hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260289
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2013 Dec;19(6):609-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Hannele Turunen
Pirjo Partanen
Tarja Kvist
Merja Miettinen
Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2013 Dec;19(6):609-17
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Finland
Humans
Internet
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Organizational Culture
Patient Safety
Abstract
Nurse managers (NMs) and registered nurses (RNs) have key roles in developing the patient safety culture, as the nursing staff is the largest professional group in health-care services. We explored their views on the patient safety culture in four acute care hospitals in Finland. The data were collected from NMs (n?=?109) and RNs (n?=?723) by means of a Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture instrument and analyzed statistically. Both groups recognized patient safety problems and critically evaluated error-prevention mechanisms in the hospitals. RNs, in particular, estimated the situation more critically. There is a need to develop the patient safety culture of hospitals by discussing openly about them and learning from mistakes and by developing practices and mechanisms to prevent them. NMs have central roles in developing the safety culture at the system level in hospitals in order to ensure that nurses caring for patients do it safely.
PubMed ID
24330212 View in PubMed
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WHO: the casualties and compromises of renewal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7389
Source
Lancet. 2002 May 4;359(9317):1605-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-2002
Author
Richard Horton
Author Affiliation
The Lancet, 32 Jamestown Road, London NW1 7BY, UK. richard.horton@lancet.com
Source
Lancet. 2002 May 4;359(9317):1605-11
Date
May-4-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Humans
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Politics
World Health Organization - organization & administration
Abstract
The World Health Organization is the leading international agency in health. WHO's reputation reached a peak in the 1970s with the then director-general Halfdan Mahler's advocacy of Health for All by the Year 2000 and the successful worldwide eradication of smallpox. The 1980s and 1990s saw WHO lose much of its authority. Too easily, the blame was put on one man-Mahler's successor, Hiroshi Nakajima. In 1998, Gro Harlem Brundtland, Figure 1 a former Prime Minister of Norway, took office and WHO began a period of major strategic and structural reform. Almost 4 years into her first term as director-general, I visited WHO's headquarters in Geneva to learn about Dr Brundtland's successes and failures. Figure 2 The ground rules of my visit were that I could talk with anybody and attend almost any meeting (budget discussions were excluded). I interviewed Dr Brundtland, executive directors, members of the staff association, and directors and project managers of programmes such as StopTB, Roll Back Malaria, HIV-AIDS, violence prevention, polio eradication, essential drugs and medicines, and sustainable development. At senior levels, WHO is confident and clear about its purpose-in a way that matches Mahler's vision and goes beyond it in results. Brundtland told me that her most important achievements were to have "strengthened the credibility of WHO" and to have "raised the awareness of health on to the political and global development agendas". But there is a troubling schism between the aspirations of its leadership and the realities faced by the organisation on the ground. Rapid change during the past 4 years has reinvigorated WHO's mandate, but poor management has created new tensions that the organisation's leadership seems unwilling to address.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2002 Sep 21;360(9337):953-412354505
PubMed ID
12047986 View in PubMed
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703 records – page 1 of 71.