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From Visions to Practical Policy: The Universal Design Journey in Norway. What Did We Learn? What Did We Gain? What Now?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282107
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:43-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Einar Lund
Olav Rand Bringa
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2016;229:43-52
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility
Concept Formation
Norway
Organizational Case Studies
Policy Making
Abstract
The national policy in Norway have since the last part of the 1990-ies been organized in programs that erected actions including national authorities, municipalities, regional authorities and private enterprises. What have we gained by our national activities to mainstream inclusive and accessibility policy for persons with reduced capability through the principles of Universal Design? Have we made society accessible to everyone and prevented discrimination. Are the results visible? We can measure results on several sectors, inter alia public buildings, outdoor areas, central communication hubs, public transport and the occurrence plans for Universal Design in municipalities and regions. Through several programs and action plans the Norwegian government has developed a sectoral approach for including persons with disabilities in the society. The majority of ministries have participated in these plans. Local initiatives, local councils for disabled people, and later on municipalities and county administrations were supported by national authorities as complements to regulations and laws. In addition, guidelines and assisting funds were used. The main objective was to redefine the national policy, using better defined national goals and introducing Universal Design to replace accessibility as the basic tool. The mainstreaming of the accessibility policy, where Universal Design was included in relevant sectors and activities, was a crucial part of the strategy. The national policy was organized in programs that erected actions focusing on how to reach, inspire and include municipalities and regional authorities in their own struggle for Universal Design. Through the mainstream approach ministries have both earmarked economic transfers to their own agencies and used steering documents guide to these agencies how to implement Universal Design in their advisory services, in practicing laws and regulations and in their own planning and building activities.
PubMed ID
27534285 View in PubMed
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Sources of practice knowledge among nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175786
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Apr;15(4):460-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Carole A Estabrooks
William Rutakumwa
Katherine A O'Leary
Joanne Profetto-McGrath
Margaret Milner
Merry Jo Levers
Shannon Scott-Findlay
Author Affiliation
Knowledge Utilization Studies Program, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2005 Apr;15(4):460-76
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Anthropology, Cultural
Humans
Knowledge
Nurses
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Abstract
Several studies have been published listing sources of practice knowledge used by nurses. However, the authors located no studies that asked clinicians to describe comprehensively and categorize the kinds of knowledge needed to practice or in which the researchers attempted to understand how clinicians privilege various knowledge sources. In this article, the authors report findings from two large ethnographic case studies in which sources of practice knowledge was a subsidiary theme. They draw on data from individual and card sort interviews, as well as participant observations, to identify nurses' sources of practice knowledge. Their findings demonstrate that nurses categorize their sources of practice knowledge into four broad groupings: social interactions, experiential knowledge, documents, and a priori knowledge. The insights gained add new understanding about sources of knowledge used by nurses and challenge the disproportionate weight that proponents of the evidence-based movement ascribe to research knowledge.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Res. 2007 Jul-Aug;56(4 Suppl):S53-917625475
PubMed ID
15761093 View in PubMed
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Establishing conversation spaces in hastily formed networks: the worst fire in modern Swedish history.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258126
Source
Disasters. 2014 Oct;38(4):790-807
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Jonas Lundberg
Eva K Törnqvist
Simin Nadjm-Tehrani
Author Affiliation
Associate Professor, Department of Science and Technology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Disasters. 2014 Oct;38(4):790-807
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Community Networks - organization & administration
Fires
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
Sweden
Abstract
In presenting examples from the most extensive and demanding fire in modern Swedish history, this paper describes challenges facing hastily formed networks in exceptional situations. Two concepts that have been used in the analysis of the socio-technical systems that make up a response are conversation space and sensemaking. This paper argues that a framework designed to promote understanding of the sensemaking process must take into consideration the time and the location at which an individual is engaged in an event. In hastily formed networks, location is partly mediated through physical systems that form conversation spaces of players and their interaction practices. This paper identifies and discusses four challenges to the formation of shared conversation spaces. It is based on the case study of the 2006 Bodträskfors forest fire in Sweden and draws on the experiences of organised volunteers and firefighters who participated in a hastily formed network created to combat the fire.
PubMed ID
25196337 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Provider. 2016 Jul; 42(7):40-2
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Valdeko Kreil
Source
Provider. 2016 Jul; 42(7):40-2
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cooperative Behavior
Healthy Diet
Meals
Nursing Homes
Organizational Case Studies
PubMed ID
29601161 View in PubMed
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Leadership, organization and health at work: a case study of a Swedish industrial company.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85801
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Jun;23(2):127-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Eriksson Andrea
Jansson Bjarne
Haglund Bo J A
Axelsson Runo
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, P.O. Box 12133, SE-402 42 Göteborg, Sweden. andrea@nhv.se
Source
Health Promot Int. 2008 Jun;23(2):127-33
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Leadership
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Culture
Sweden
Abstract
The application of knowledge on organization and leadership is important for the promotion of health at workplace. The purpose of this article is to analyse the leadership and organization, including the organizational culture, of a Swedish industrial company in relation to the health of the employees. The leadership in this company has been oriented towards developing and actively promoting a culture and a structure of organization where the employees have a high degree of control over their work situation. According to the employees, this means extensive possibilities for personal development and responsibility, as well as good companionship, which makes them feel well at work. This is also supported by the low sickness rate of the company. The results indicate that the leadership and organization of this company may have been conducive to the health of the employees interviewed. However, the culture of personal responsibility and the structure of self-managed teams seemed to suit only those who were able to manage the demands of the company and adapt to that kind of organization. Therefore, the findings indicate that the specific context of the technology, the environment and the professional level of the employees need to be taken into consideration when analysing the relation between leadership, organization and health at work.
PubMed ID
18344562 View in PubMed
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On the integration of healthcare emergency systems in Europe: the WETS project case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68936
Source
IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed. 1998 Jun;2(2):89-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
F. Beltrame
P. Maryni
G. Orsi
Author Affiliation
DIST, University of Genoa, Italy. francesc@dist.unige.it
Source
IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed. 1998 Jun;2(2):89-97
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
European Union
Organizational Case Studies
Systems Integration
Abstract
The European Union (EU) is characterized by a large number of different emergency healthcare (EHC) systems. In this situation, a common policy for healthcare emergency handling is largely prevented and is a cause of an increase of the costs associated with such systems all over Europe. There is, hence, a need for a homogenization and integration of healthcare emergency systems in Europe. This turns out to be difficult because of the ethical, political, legal, and technological differences and peculiarities of the European scenario and the large investments that would be needed in this sector. The process of integration passes through the identification of the main functionalities--driven by the user needs in their real life conditions--along with the technologies that are best fitted for supporting them. In this paper, several aspects related to these problems are analyzed and a real case study, drawn from the Project "Worldwide Emergency Telemedicine Services" (WETS), supported by the European Commission (DG-XIII), is presented. Within WETS, several pilot sites (in Italy, Spain, Greece, Denmark, and Iceland) consider different aspects of the integration of healthcare emergency systems with particular focus on the sharing of solutions that "traditionally" belong to different environments (i.e., land, air, and sea). The involvement of important hospitals, ship companies, airlines, and emergency health institutions allows us to devote a large part of this two-year project (1998-1999) to validate and demonstrate the results of the development phase in real-life conditions. Some more concrete details are given for the Italian pilot site, where the authors operate.
PubMed ID
10719518 View in PubMed
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Source
Nurs BC. 2008 Oct;40(4):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Monica Bisal
Source
Nurs BC. 2008 Oct;40(4):14-8
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Heart Transplantation - nursing
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Organizational Case Studies
PubMed ID
18947067 View in PubMed
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What is health promotion capacity? A relational perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266478
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2015;29(2):170-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Morten Hulvej Rod
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2015;29(2):170-84
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Capacity building
Denmark
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Models, Theoretical
Organizational Case Studies
Abstract
In organizational health promotion research, health promotion capacity is a central concept that is used to describe the abilities of individuals, organizations, and communities to promote health. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the theoretical underpinnings of the literature on health promotion capacity building and, further, to suggest an alternative theoretical perspective which draws on recent developments in organizational theory.
The paper begins by a critical discussion of the capacity building literature, which is juxtaposed with the relational perspective of contemporary organizational theory. The theoretical argument is developed in reference to the case of Danish municipal health promotion agencies, drawing on secondary sources as well as ethnographic fieldwork among public health officers.
The capacity building literature tends to reify the concept of capacity. In contrast, this paper argues that health promotion capacity is constantly defined and redefined through processes of organizing. The case study suggests that, faced with limited resources and limited knowledge, health promotion officials attain a sense of capacity through an ongoing reworking of organizational forms.
Organizational health promotion research should look for the organizational forms that are conducive to health promotion practices under shifting social circumstances.
This paper makes explicit an inherent theoretical tension in the capacity building literature and suggests a novel theoretical framework for understanding organizational capacity.
PubMed ID
25800331 View in PubMed
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Integrating an incident management system within a continuity of operations programme: case study of the Bank of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114480
Source
J Bus Contin Emer Plan. 2013;6(3):272-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Carole Loop
Author Affiliation
Bank of Canada, Ontario, Canada. cloop@bank-banque-canada.ca
Source
J Bus Contin Emer Plan. 2013;6(3):272-81
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Commerce
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Humans
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Abstract
Carrying out critical business functions without interruption requires a resilient and robust business continuity framework. By embedding an industry-standard incident management system within its business continuity structure, the Bank of Canada strengthened its response plan by enabling timely response to incidents while maintaining a strong focus on business continuity. A total programme approach, integrating the two disciplines, provided for enhanced recovery capabilities. While the value of an effective and efficient response organisation is clear, as demonstrated by emergency events around the world, incident response structures based on normal operating hierarchy can experience unique challenges. The internationally-recognised Incident Command System (ICS) model addresses these issues and reflects the five primary incident management functions, each contributing to the overall strength and effectiveness of the response organisation. The paper focuses on the Bank of Canada's successful implementation of the ICS model as its incident management and continuity of operations programmes evolved to reflect current best practices.
PubMed ID
23615067 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
JEMS. 2014 Feb;39(2):34-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014

498 records – page 1 of 50.