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253 records – page 1 of 26.

The access to contraception and sterilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36230
Source
Entre Nous Cph Den. 1993 Jun;(22-23):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
C. Blayo
A E Leitao
Source
Entre Nous Cph Den. 1993 Jun;(22-23):4
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Contraception
Delivery of Health Care
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Services
Health planning
Health Services Accessibility
Organization and Administration
Pharmacies
Sterilization, Reproductive
Abstract
The various countries of Europe have similar conditions of access to contraceptive methods. In eastern Europe, however, the supply of contraceptive pills, coils, spermicidal products, and condoms is less than the demand (except for Hungary and the Czech and Slovak republics), particularly in Poland, in the former Soviet Union, and in Romania. Sweden and Turkey have authorized midwives to prescribe contraceptive pills or to insert coils. In Turkey, Bulgaria, Romania, and in the former Soviet Union, the dispensing of pills without prescription is tolerated. Spermicidal products can generally be dispensed in pharmacies without a prescription. Condoms are sold even in Ireland. France dose not allow the advertising of contraceptives in nonmedical journals, while Denmark encourages such advertising. Today a number of European countries regulate contraceptive surgery. In Finland, a minimum of 3 children is the prerequisite and age conditions are set (over 18 years in Turkey, over 25 years in Austria, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, and Sweden, over 30 years in Finland, and over 35 years in Croatia and Slovenia). Sterilization for contraceptive purposes constitutes a statutory offense of mutilation in France, Ireland, Austria, Greece, Malta, and Poland. Sterilization is carried out in Spain and Italy, less so in Ireland and Malta, and there is slow progress in this regard in Belgium and France. Voluntary sterilization is legally allowed in Hungary and Romania, practiced on a small scale in Albania, and prohibited in Bulgaria. The Netherlands has the highest number of couples protected by sterilization. Most often the public family planning services are integrated in other services, such as community clinics, hospitals, and pre- and postnatal clinics. In Europe as compared with the developing countries, a very large number of private practitioners have the responsibility of informing and prescribing.
PubMed ID
12222243 View in PubMed
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The accuracy of administrative data diagnoses of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134892
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Sasha Bernatsky
Tina Linehan
John G Hanly
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sasha.bernatsky@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Nova Scotia
Organization and Administration - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To examine the validity of case definitions for systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases [SARD; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), myositis, Sjögren's syndrome, vasculitis, and polymyalgia rheumatica] based on administrative data, compared to rheumatology records.
A list of rheumatic disease diagnoses was generated from population-based administrative billing and hospitalization databases. Subjects who had been seen by an arthritis center rheumatologist were identified, and the medical records reviewed.
We found that 844 Nova Scotia residents had a diagnosis of one of the rheumatic diseases of interest, based on administrative data, and had had = 1 rheumatology assessment at a provincial arthritis center. Charts were available on 824 subjects, some of whom had been identified in the administrative database with > 1 diagnosis. Thus a total of 1136 diagnoses were available for verification against clinical records. Of the 824 subjects, 680 (83%) had their administrative database diagnoses confirmed on chart review. The majority of subjects who were "false-positive" for a given rheumatic disease on administrative data had a true diagnosis of a similar rheumatic disease. Most sensitivity estimates for specific administrative data-based case definitions were > 90%, although for SSc, the sensitivity was 80.5%. The specificity estimates were also > 90%, except for SLE, where the specificity was 72.5%.
Although health administrative data may be a valid resource, there are potential problems regarding the specificity and sensitivity of case definitions, which should be kept in mind for future studies.
PubMed ID
21532057 View in PubMed
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Addressing male sexuality: a perspective from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75082
Source
Plan Parent Chall. 1996;(2):41-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B A Rix
Source
Plan Parent Chall. 1996;(2):41-4
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Behavior
Counseling
Demography
Denmark
Developed Countries
Economics
Europe
Family Planning Services
Health planning
Health services needs and demand
Organization and Administration
Personality
Population
Population Characteristics
Psychology
Scandinavia
Sexuality
Social Behavior
Abstract
Family planning associations (FPAs) in the Scandinavian countries know the importance of addressing the needs of male adolescents and young men. Even though sex education is part of school curricula in Denmark, many young men lack good and confident counsellors to give them advice about sexuality and reproduction. In Denmark, almost half of men aged 16-20 years never talk to their parents about sexuality. It should therefore not be surprising that more than two-thirds of callers to the Danish FPA's, and other European FPAs', anonymous sex counseling telephone line are male. Many of the questions asked by young men indicate insecurity about sexual activity and what is perceived to be sexually normal. FPAs can play a vital role in providing counselling to boys and young men. Male discussion groups can help identify the needs of boys and young. Involving adolescents and the importance of the male perspective are discussed.
PubMed ID
12291944 View in PubMed
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Adolescent reproductive behavior: an international comparison of developed countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65231
Source
Adv Adolesc Mental Health. 1990;4:13-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
J D Forrest
Source
Adv Adolesc Mental Health. 1990;4:13-34
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Adolescent
Age Factors
Americas
Attitude
Behavior
Birth rate
Canada
Communication
Comparative Study
Contraception
Contraception Behavior
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Demography
Developed Countries
Education
England
Europe
Family Characteristics
Family Planning Services
Family Relations
Fertility
France
Great Britain
Health Services Accessibility
Mass Media
Methods
Netherlands
North America
Organization and Administration
Parents
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Program Evaluation
Psychology
Research
Scandinavia
Sex Education
Sexual Behavior
Sweden
Wales
Abstract
A comparative study of adolescent reproductive behavior in the 1980s examined difference in pregnancy, birth, and abortion levels among teenagers in developed countries especially in the US, Canada, the UK, France, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Only 6 of 37 countries with total fertility rates 3.5 and per capita income US$2000/year, and at least 1 million people had adolescent birth rates higher than the US (Bulgaria, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Romania, Hungary, and Chile). The US had the highest abortion rate (42/1000) followed by Hungary (27/1000). Thus the US had the highest adolescent pregnancy rate (96/1000) as well as Hungary (96/1000). The 6 country analysis showed that reducing the level of sexual activity among teenagers is not necessarily needed to achieve lower pregnancy rates. For example, Sweden had the highest levels of sexual activity but its pregnancy rate were 33% as high as those of the US. The rates of sexual activity among teenagers in the Netherlands equaled those of the US, but its pregnancy rates were 14% as high as those of the US. All countries had earlier, more extensive, and better contraceptive use among sexually active teenagers than the US which accounted for their lower pregnancy rates. The more realistic acceptance of sexual activity among teenagers and provision of contraceptives in all the countries except the US differed from the societal ambivalence in the US. Thus ambivalence about sexuality and the appropriateness of contraceptive use results in lower contraceptive use and greater adolescent pregnancy rates. US adolescents constantly receive conflicting messages that sex is romantic, thrilling, and arousing but it is also immoral to have premarital sex. Thus adults need to be more candid about sexuality so they can clearly convey to adolescents their expectations for responsible behavior and to provide the information and services needed to make effective use of contraceptives when sexually active.
PubMed ID
12317626 View in PubMed
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Adolescents and contraceptive advice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36231
Source
Entre Nous Cph Den. 1993 Jun;(22-23):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
M. Sondergaard
Source
Entre Nous Cph Den. 1993 Jun;(22-23):12
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Contraception
Counseling
Demography
Denmark
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Services
Fertility
Health planning
Organization and Administration
Population
Population Characteristics
Population Dynamics
Pregnancy in adolescence
Scandinavia
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
In the Scandinavian countries there is no age limit for adolescents' access to contraceptive advice. Denmark deems it important to avoid barriers which prevent young girls from seeking contraceptive advice. Offering easy access to counseling is preferable to adolescent girls having unwanted pregnancies. In Denmark there is no age limit for adolescent girls to see their general practitioner (GP) for instruction in the use contraceptive methods. Without parental consent all can receive such counseling. In addition, the GP is obliged to observe professional secrecy at counseling, hence parents cannot request any information from the GP. There must be exceptionally serious reasons for breaking this professional secrecy. Thus a young woman should not refrain from seeking advice out of fear that her parents will know about her intimate life, and that she protects herself against unwanted pregnancy. It is not desirable to fix any age limit for adolescents' right to seek this advice because it concerns the adolescents' actual sex life. After the introduction of free abortion, many quite young girls sought abortion. The objective is to bolster the development that all children receive the requisite sex education at school, as well as to ensure that there is easy access to information on contraceptive methods. The GP's counseling is provided free of charge. A number of contraceptive clinics are available all over the country to provide alternative contraceptive counseling in case a young woman does not want to consult her GP because perchance the GP is her family doctor. Denmark as well as the other Scandinavian countries characteristically give high priority to promoting and improving the access to information and counseling on contraceptive methods by avoiding all economical, geographical, ethical, or emotional barriers.
PubMed ID
12222237 View in PubMed
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Adverse events during air and ground neonatal transport: 13 years' experience from a neonatal transport team in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275292
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015 Jul;28(10):1231-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Johannes van den Berg
Linn Olsson
Amelie Svensson
Stellan Håkansson
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015 Jul;28(10):1231-7
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Organization and Administration
Patient Safety - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Sweden
Transportation of Patients - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To study the prevalence of adverse events (AEs) associated with neonatal transport, and to categorize, classify and assess the risk estimation of these events.
Written comments in 1082 transport records during the period 1999-2011 were reviewed. Comments related to events that infringed on patient and staff safety were included as AEs, and categorized and further classified as complaint, imminent risk of incident/negative event, actual incident or actual negative event. AEs were also grouped into emergency or planned transports, and risk estimation was calculated according to a risk assessment tool and defined as low, intermediate, high or extreme risk.
AEs (N = 883) were divided into five categories: logistics (n = 337), organization (n = 177), equipment (n = 165), vehicle (n = 129) and medical/nursing care (n = 75). Eighty-five percent of AEs were classified as incidents or negative events. The majority of AEs were estimated to be of low or intermediate risk in both planned and emergency transports. AEs estimated to be of high or extreme risk were significantly more frequent in emergency transports (OR = 10.1; 95% CI: 5.0-20.9; p
PubMed ID
25102938 View in PubMed
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253 records – page 1 of 26.