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13 records – page 1 of 2.

The Canadian question: what's so great about intelligence?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213459
Source
Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 1996;5(2):307-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996

Comparative report on transplantation and relevant ethical problems in five European countries, and some reflections on Japan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72108
Source
Transpl Int. 2000;13(4):266-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
K. Fleischhauer
G. Hermerén
S. Holm
L. Honnefelder
R. Kimura
O. Quintana
D. Serrão
Author Affiliation
Institut für Wissenschaft und Ethik, Bonn, Germany. fleischhauer@iwe.uni-bonn.de
Source
Transpl Int. 2000;13(4):266-75
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Death - legislation & jurisprudence
Comparative Study
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Ethics, Medical
Female
Germany
Health Care Rationing
Humans
Japan
Male
Middle Aged
Organ Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Portugal
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Spain
Sweden
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Comparison of transplantation medicine in Sweden, Denmark, Germany, Spain and Portugal reveals many and important differences with respect to frequency of transplantations, frequency of life donations, legal regulations and influence of the family on organ donation. The differences observed are at least partly related to cultural and value differences between the various countries, but many questions need to be studied systematically and in more detail before useful conclusions can be drawn. One study would have to address the problem of how differences in the family influence on organ donation can be explained. Another question needing further clarification concerns the exact meaning of "medical decision" and "medical criteria" because these terms, on which access to- and selection from the waiting list largely depends, are equivocally defined and seem to differ according to different traditions. Open questions also arise with respect to the influence of "closeness or distance" on medical decision making. The findings indicate that it would be premature to propose common guidelines to be observed within Europe as long as the above mentioned and some further questions have not been systematically studied and thoroughly analyzed.
PubMed ID
10959479 View in PubMed
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Source
Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1990;24(4):504-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
B M Dickens
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
Bull Pan Am Health Organ. 1990;24(4):504-9
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology
Advisory Committees
Bioethical Issues
Bioethics
Canada - epidemiology
Cultural Diversity
Family Planning Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Forecasting
Humans
Internationality
Organ Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence
Research
Social Change
Social Control, Formal
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
Canadian bioethicists have long enjoyed access to bioethics programs in the United States and have collaborated with U.S. organizations working in this field. Nevertheless, special features of Canada's multicultural society and public health services are increasingly seen as raising distinctive issues requiring special attention. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of current Canadian bioethics trends in various areas--including those of training, research on human subjects, human reproduction, termination of life, biotechnology, organ transplants, and AIDS. Comparison of this work with other articles in this issue will show that while some of the trends involved have paralleled similar ones in the United States, some trends (such as that regarding confidentiality and the reporting of HIV infection) have been quite different.
PubMed ID
2073564 View in PubMed
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[Death criteria. Legislation on autopsy and transplantation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228713
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Jul 11;90(28):23-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-11-1990

Eligibility for organ donation: a medico-legal perspective on defining and determining death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149821
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2009 Nov;56(11):851-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Jocelyn Downie
Matthew Kutcher
Chantelle Rajotte
Alison Shea
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, Dalhousie University, 6061 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 4H9, Canada. jocelyn.downie@dal.ca
Source
Can J Anaesth. 2009 Nov;56(11):851-63
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Death
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Heart Arrest - physiopathology
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Organ Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue Donors - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
In the context of post-mortem organ donation, there is an obvious need for certainty regarding the legal definition and determination of death, as individuals must be legally pronounced dead before organs may be procured for donation. Surprisingly then, the legal situation in Canada with regard to the definition and determination of death is uncertain. The purpose of this review is to provide anesthesiologists and critical care specialists with a medico-legal perspective regarding the definition and determination of death (particularly as it relates to non-heart-beating donor protocols) and to contribute to ongoing improvement in policies, protocols, and practices in this area.
The status quo with regard to the current legal definition of death is presented as well as the criteria for determining if and when death has occurred. A number of important problems with the status quo are described, followed by a series of recommendations to address these problems.
The legal deficiencies regarding the definition and determination of death in Canada may place health care providers at risk of civil or criminal liability, discourage potential organ donation, and frustrate the wishes of some individuals to donate their organs. The definition and criteria for the determination of death should be clearly set out in legislation. In addition, the current use of non-heart-beating donor protocols in Canada will remain inconsistent with Canadian law until more persuasive evidence on the potential return of cardiac function after cardiac arrest is gathered and made publicly available or until a concrete proposal to abandon the dead donor rule and amend Canadian law is adopted following a process of public debate and intense multidisciplinary review.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 2009 Nov;56(11):789-9219711143
PubMed ID
19585180 View in PubMed
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Is Canada's stem cell legislation unwittingly discriminatory?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161808
Source
Am J Bioeth. 2007 Aug;7(8):50-2; discussion W4-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Shane K Green
Author Affiliation
Social Impact & Outreach, Ontario Genomics Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada. sgreen@ontariogenomics.ca
Source
Am J Bioeth. 2007 Aug;7(8):50-2; discussion W4-6
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bioethical Issues
Canada
Embryonic Stem Cells - transplantation
Fertilization in Vitro
Histocompatibility Antigens - immunology
Humans
Legislation, Medical - ethics - standards
Organ Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence
Prejudice
Tissue Banks - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue and Organ Procurement - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment On: Am J Bioeth. 2007 Aug;7(8):37-4417710702
PubMed ID
17710706 View in PubMed
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Legal aspects of organ transplantation: an overview of European law.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223473
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 1992 Jul-Aug;11(4 Pt 2):S160-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
G. Wolfslast
Author Affiliation
Universität Göttingen, Germany.
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 1992 Jul-Aug;11(4 Pt 2):S160-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Death - legislation & jurisprudence
Europe
Great Britain
Humans
Organ Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence
Scandinavia
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
1515435 View in PubMed
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[Prior to the new transplantation law more and more people are willing to become donors, but fewer organs are available].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212355
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Mar 27;93(13):1180
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-27-1996
Author
P. Orn
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Mar 27;93(13):1180
Date
Mar-27-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Organ Transplantation - legislation & jurisprudence
Public Health
Sweden
Tissue and Organ Procurement - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
8656825 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.