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64 records – page 1 of 7.

An investigation of the effects of a self-flossing program in London elementary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247348
Source
Ont Dent. 1979 Apr;56(4):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1979

Assessment of dental restorative status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42111
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1977 Jan-Feb;85(2):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Haugen
I. Mjör
Source
Scand J Dent Res. 1977 Jan-Feb;85(2):96-100
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dental Amalgam
Dental Restoration, Permanent - methods
Evaluation Studies
Humans
Molar
Norway
Oral Hygiene Index
School Dentistry
Abstract
Class I and Class II restorations on selected teeth of children aged 7-13 years were recorded in order to find which types of restorations were suitable for clinical evaluation of amalgam restorations with regard to frequency and anticipated observation period. Restorations suited for amalgam evaluation were found to be MO type restoration on all first molars and occlusal, palatal, and occlusal/palatal restorations on maxillary first molars and buccal pit restorations on mandibllar first molars. For the age group 7-11 years, the MO type restoration in the first molars will reflect the caries situation; the DO type restoration on maxillary first molars will serve this purpose for an age group approximately 2-4 years older. Thus selected recording of restorations must be considered age dependent in order to give a representative reflection of the caries experience. The most striking difference between the groups with high and low restoration frequency was a 2-year delay in the group with low frequency as compared with the group with high restoration frequency.
PubMed ID
265090 View in PubMed
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Association between dental health and acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231065
Source
BMJ. 1989 Mar 25;298(6676):779-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-1989
Author
K J Mattila
M S Nieminen
V V Valtonen
V P Rasi
Y A Kesäniemi
S L Syrjälä
P S Jungell
M. Isoluoma
K. Hietaniemi
M J Jokinen
Author Affiliation
First Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
BMJ. 1989 Mar 25;298(6676):779-81
Date
Mar-25-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Diseases - complications
Myocardial Infarction - etiology - microbiology
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene Index
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Class
Abstract
Known risk factors for coronary heart disease do not explain all of the clinical and epidemiological features of the disease. To examine the role of chronic bacterial infections as risk factors for the disease the association between poor dental health and acute myocardial infarction was investigated in two separate case-control studies of a total of 100 patients with acute myocardial infarction and 102 controls selected from the community at random. Dental health was graded by using two indexes, one of which was assessed blind. Based on these indexes dental health was significantly worse in patients with acute myocardial infarction than in controls. The association remained valid after adjustment for age, social class, smoking, serum lipid concentrations, and the presence of diabetes. Further prospective studies are required in different populations to confirm the association and to elucidate its nature.
Notes
Cites: Z Klin Chem Klin Biochem. 1974 Sep;12(9):403-74428856
Cites: Diabetologia. 1975 Dec;11(6):541-81239396
Cites: Lancet. 1977 Apr 23;1(8017):883-467289
Cites: Lipids. 1978 May;13(5):370-2672474
Cites: Circulation. 1979 Dec;60(7):1575-87387286
Cites: Lancet. 1980 Jun 28;1(8183):1387-96104174
Cites: Am J Hematol. 1981 Sep;11(2):159-647030066
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1982 May;104(5):653-607042797
Cites: Thromb Res. 1982 May 15;26(4):267-746180502
Cites: Scand J Haematol. 1982 Aug;29(2):175-846813961
Cites: Lab Invest. 1983 Jan;48(1):25-346337296
Cites: Agents Actions. 1983 Aug;13(5-6):461-96356815
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1983 Dec;43(8):677-856364321
Cites: J Dent Res. 1984 Mar;63(3):441-516366001
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1985 May;102(5):699-7023985518
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Nov 21;313(21):1315-222865677
Cites: Scand J Infect Dis. 1986;18(3):211-53738432
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Jun 11;316(24):1514-83587281
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Oct 15;317(16):996-10043309652
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1988 Apr 23;296(6630):1156-603132245
Cites: Ann Clin Res. 1988;20(1-2):102-133044250
Comment In: BMJ. 1989 Jun 10;298(6687):1579-802503130
PubMed ID
2496855 View in PubMed
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Can a prenatal dental public health program make a difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135131
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Diana Louise Lin
Rosamund Harrison
Jolanta Aleksejuniene
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. dianallin@aol.com
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2011;77:b32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Birth weight
British Columbia
Dental Care
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Health Education, Dental
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Infant
Infant care
Oral Hygiene Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Periodontal Index
Personal Satisfaction
Poverty
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care
Program Evaluation
Prospective Studies
Public Health Dentistry
Self Report
Abstract
Some pregnant women may be at increased risk of poor oral health. A publicly funded prenatal dental program in Vancouver, British Columbia, called Healthiest Babies Possible (HBP), has been providing oral health education and limited clinical services for over 20 years to low-income women assessed to be at high risk of preterm or low-weight births. This report is an assessment of the initial outcomes.
A prospective before-after evaluation of a non-probability convenience sample of women was undertaken over 1 year (2005-2006). Participants were seen at the customary 2 clinic visits, and were asked to return for a postnatal visit. Data collected by an inside evaluator, the program's dental hygienist, included questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, observations, clinical indices, appointment statistics and self-reports. Univariate and bivariate analyses (Student's t test and ANOVA) were performed.
Of the 67 women in the sample, 61 agreed to participate; 36 (59%) attended all 3 appointments at the clinic, and 40 (66%) completed all 3 interviews and questionnaires either at the clinic or by telephone. Clinical indices of gingival health improved significantly over the time of the evaluation. Improvements in tooth cleaning were demonstrated by a significant decrease in plaque (p
PubMed ID
21507285 View in PubMed
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Caries prevalence of young adults in Oslo, Norway, and Porto, Portugal. A comparative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62874
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Apr;52(2):111-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M D Marques
E. Bjertness
H M Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentistry, Dental Faculty, University of Porto, Portugal.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1994 Apr;52(2):111-5
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene Index
Portugal - epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Factors
Social Class
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was primarily to establish the oral health status of young adults in the area of Porto, Portugal. The assessment is based on a random sample of 30- to 39-year-olds with criteria identical to those of a Norwegian study of 35-year-olds. This makes it possible also to present a comparative analysis of the caries prevalence in Oslo, Norway, and Porto, Portugal. The results indicate lower DMF scores among the Portuguese (DMFS = 46.2) than the Norwegian (DMFS = 85.0) adults. The difference is primarily due to a greater number of filled surfaces among the Norwegians (FS = 59.7) than the Portuguese (FS = 4.4). However, carious surfaces are more prevalent among Portuguese than Norwegian adults (DS = 9.2 versus DS = 3.3). Both among Portuguese and Norwegian adults, oral hygiene and dental visits seem to play an important role with regard to the prevalence of decayed surfaces. Decayed surfaces were more prevalent among men than women, and a correlation between social status and prevalence of decayed surfaces was present in both societies.
PubMed ID
8048321 View in PubMed
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Caries risk profiles of 12-13-year-old children in Laos and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29693
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(1):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
G L Tayanin
G Hänsel Petersson
D. Bratthall
Author Affiliation
WHO Collaborating Centre, Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden.
Source
Oral Health Prev Dent. 2005;3(1):15-23
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Female
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Humans
Lactobacillus - isolation & purification
Laos - epidemiology
Male
Oral Hygiene Index
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Saliva - microbiology - physiology
Software
Statistics, nonparametric
Streptococcus mutans - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
PURPOSE: To analyse caries risk factors of 12-13-year-old children living in Laos, using the computer program Cariogram to illustrate the caries risk profile. In addition, to compare the results with a study performed in Sweden. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred Laotian and 392 Swedish children were included. Interviews were performed to obtain information on diet intake and fluoride use. Saliva was analysed for mutans streptococci, lactobacilli and secretion rate/buffering capacity. Oral hygiene was assessed using the Silness and Löe criteria. Caries prevalence was recorded according to WHO. The data were entered into the Cariogram to determine each child's caries risk, expressed as 'the chance of avoiding caries'. The children were divided into five risk groups. RESULTS: Mean DMFT level of the Laotian children was 4.61 +/- 2.95 and 1.38 +/- 1.97 in the Swedish group. For the risk factors plaque amount, frequency of food intake, saliva secretion rate, buffering capacity and fluoride, the Laotian children had significantly less favourable values compared to the Swedes. Only 6% of Laotian children belonged to the Cariogram low risk group versus 40% of the Swedish children. The mean DMFT for the five Cariogram groups was (from low to high risk) 0.00, 3.00, 3.56, 5.66, 6.11 for the Lao children and 0.31, 1.39, 2.56, 3.03, 2.91 for the Swedish ones. The mean chance of avoiding caries was 37.3% for the Laotians and 69.2% for the Swedish children (p
PubMed ID
15921333 View in PubMed
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Changes in periodontal disease indicators in 35-year-old Oslo citizens from 1973 to 1984.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67925
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1990 Apr;17(4):249-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
B F Hansen
E. Bjertness
P. Gjermo
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, Dental Faculty, University of Oslo.
Source
J Clin Periodontol. 1990 Apr;17(4):249-54
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Calculus - epidemiology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Female
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene Index
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Random Allocation
Abstract
Periodontal disease indicators were evaluated according to the periodontal treatment need system (PTNS) in random samples of 35-year-old citizens of Oslo in 1973 and 1984. The study indicated that although periodontal disease was a common finding in both samples, there was a significant reduction in score C (indicating need for complex periodontal treatment) in 1984 compared to 1973. Whereas 37.9% of the subjects showed inflamed pockets deeper than 5 mm (score C) in 1973, only 22.9% scored C in 1984 (non-Caucasians excluded). This reduction was most pronounced in females. The mean number of C-quadrants in subjects needing complex periodontal treatment was also reduced from 2.0 in 1973 to 1.7 in 1984. Further analyses of the 1984 sample showed that the mean number of C-quadrants was significantly lower in subjects with low OHI-S scores and in regular dental visitors, whereas sex, years at school, toothbrushing frequency, interdental cleaning habits, previous periodontal therapy, self-experienced need for treatment, health attitude or smoking habits, did not seem to influence the prevalence of score C.
PubMed ID
2347950 View in PubMed
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Changes in periodontal treatment needs. A follow-up study of Oslo citizens from the ages of 35 to 50 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72991
Source
J Periodontal Res. 1995 Nov;30(6):410-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
B F Hansen
E. Bjertness
J K Grønnesby
H M Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnosis, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Periodontal Res. 1995 Nov;30(6):410-7
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Care - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Oral Hygiene Index
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Periodontal Index
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Abstract
A random sample of 35-year-old subjects from Oslo took part in a dental survey in 1973 and were re-examined in 1988. Eighty-one subjects (85%) attended the final examination. The need for periodontal treatment was assessed by the Periodontal Treatment Need System (PTNS), and the oral hygiene by the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S). The participants attended a structured interview and answered a questionnaire about general and dental health habits as well as psycho-social factors. Only small changes in the distribution of subjects in the different PTNS categories were found to have taken place during the 15 years. In 1973, 56.8% were in need of scaling (Class B) and 32.1% had one or more deep inflamed pockets (Class C), and in 1988 the scores were 54.3% and 30.1% respectively. A logistic regression model was used to study the associations between risk factors and increased treatment need, as expressed by increase in the number of C-quadrants. Increased number of C-quadrants was positively associated both with short duration of education and with no interdental cleaning. Using a socio-ecological model for periodontal diseases, variables describing the items "behaviour" and "environment" were found to be most closely associated with increased need for periodontal treatment.
PubMed ID
8544105 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics of destructive periodontitis in a risk group of Swedish urban adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67728
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(1-2):9-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
B. Söder
L J Jin
P O Söder
S. Wikner
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Oral Sciences, School of Dentistry, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1995;19(1-2):9-15
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Female
Gingivitis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Oral Hygiene Index
Periodontal Index
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An initial screening investigation of 1681 Swedish urban adults aged 31-40 years with untreated periodontitis showed that 17.2% (289) had at least one site with probing depth > or = 5 mm. The 289 subjects were offered a complete clinical examination and treatment. 144 subjects, 85 men and 59 women, agreed to participate and 145 were non-responding subjects and used as a drop out sample. The results from the screening data showed that the attendants had poorer oral hygiene status and more severe periodontitis than the drop out subjects. The present report describes clinical data of this representative sample with adult periodontitis. Clinical indices were recorded and bone height (BH%) for all teeth was measured with a computer digitizing system. In the 144 attendants, Plaque Index was > 1 in 56.2%, Calculus Index was > 1 in 57.0%, Gingival Index was > 1 in 97.2% and bleeding on probing was found in 89.1% of the sites. 11.1% of the subjects had 1-3 teeth with probing depth > or = 5 mm, 59.0% 4-10 teeth, 25.7% 11-20 teeth and 4.2% > 20 teeth. 47.9% of the subjects had mean BH% less than 80. 45.1% of the subjects had at least one site with an intrabony defect, of which 20% had 3-4 sites and 27.7% > or = 5 sites. It is concluded that advanced generalized periodontitis exists in a limited number of 31-40 year-olds in Sweden. Specific risk factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease.
PubMed ID
7597634 View in PubMed
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Comparison of dental caries and oral hygiene indices for 13-14 year old Quebec children between 1977 and 1984.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233430
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1988 Mar;54(3):183-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988

64 records – page 1 of 7.