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Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1993
Author
E. Rea
G. Thompson
M E Moffatt
T K Young
J. O'Neil
A. Schwartz
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Feb;59(2):117-8, 122-5
Date
Feb-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology
Dental Health Services - organization & administration
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology - ethnology
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
In 1990, as part of a major health status assessment, a dental survey was carried out on a 20 per cent random sample of the adult population in the Keewatin region of the Northwest Territories. A 73 per cent response rate was obtained. Of the 397 people examined, 334 (88 per cent) identified themselves as Inuit. More than 20 per cent of the respondents were edentulous, including 10 per cent of those 18 to 34 years old. The median DMFT was 24 for all respondents and 21 for dentulous respondents. There was a significant difference between Inuit and non-Inuit respondents, which was most marked in the 18 to 34 year old age group (mean DMFT 22.1 versus 15.6, p
PubMed ID
8453514 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the reliability and validity of the Dental Neglect Scale in Norwegian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93684
Source
Community Dent Health. 2007 Dec;24(4):247-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Skaret E.
Astrøm A N
Haugejorden O.
Klock K S
Trovik T A
Author Affiliation
Center for Odontophobia, Faculty of Odontology, Bergen, Norway. erik.skaret@odont.uib.no
Source
Community Dent Health. 2007 Dec;24(4):247-52
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Dental Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate the reliability and construct validity of the Dental Neglect Scale (DNS) and to estimate the level of dental neglect in the adult Norwegian population. METHODS: A questionnaire containing socio-demographics, oral health attitude variables, self-reported service use and a translated version of the original DNS was tested in two samples: 1) a convenience sample of University employees (n=263) and 2) a proportionate random sample (n=2000) drawn from the national population register (age 16-79 years). The reliability assessment of the instrument was by internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and factor analysis (principal component) (n=1309). The test-retest comparisons (n=108) were analyzed by Spearman's rho for the sum-scores, and kappa statistics for single items. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the construct validity of the DNS. RESULTS: The Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the overall construct of DNS was 0.67 (n=173) and 0.57 (n=1301). Only one factor was extracted, explaining a total of 36% of the scale variance (n=1301). Cohen's kappa for the test-retest comparisons ranged from 0.21-0.79 (n=108), and Spearman's rho for the test-retest sum-scores was 0.60. Higher neglect scores were positively related to a negative opinion about own dental health (OR=3.3), last dental appointment because of pain or other problems (OR=2.3), less than 20 teeth (OR=2.2), drinking soft drinks with sugar every day (OR=2.1), non-regular dental service use (OR=2.2) and using floss or toothpicks seldom or never (OR=1.6). The prevalence of high dental neglect was 20%. CONCLUSIONS: The analyses indicated construct validity for the Dental Neglect Scale but low reliability for some of its items. One fifth of this representative sample of Norwegian adults reported a high level of dental neglect.
PubMed ID
18246843 View in PubMed
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Association between moderate to severe psoriasis and periodontitis in a Scandinavian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266915
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Rasa Skudutyte-Rysstad
Ellen Margrethe Slevolden
Bjørn Frode Hansen
Leiv Sandvik
Hans Ragnar Preus
Source
BMC Oral Health. 2014;14:139
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alveolar Bone Loss - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Chronic Disease
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Gingival Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Periodontal Pocket - epidemiology
Periodontitis - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Prevalence
Psoriasis - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of periodontitis and alveolar bone loss among individuals with psoriasis and a group of randomly selected controls.
Fifty individuals with psoriasis and 121 controls completed a structured questionnaire, and were examined clinically and radiographically. Oral examination included numbers of missing teeth, probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), presence of dental plaque and bleeding on probing, as well as alveolar bone loss from radiographs. Questionnaires requested information on age, gender, education, dental care, smoking habits, general diseases and medicament use. For adjustment for baseline differences between psoriasis individuals and controls the propensity score based on gender, age and education was computed using multivariate logistic regression. A subsample analysis for propensity score matched psoriasis individuals (n?=?50) and controls (n?=?50) was performed.
When compared with controls, psoriasis individuals had significantly more missing teeth and more sites with plaque and bleeding on probing. The prevalence of moderate and severe periodontitis was significantly higher among psoriasis individuals (24%) compared to healthy controls (10%). Similarly, 36% of psoriasis cases had one or more sites with radiographic bone loss =3 mm, compared to 13% of controls. Logistic regression analysis showed that the association between moderate/severe periodontitis and psoriasis remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score, but was attenuated when smoking was entered into the model. The association between psoriasis and one or more sites with bone loss =3 mm remained statistically significant when adjusted for propensity score and smoking and regularity of dental visits. In the propensity score (age, gender and education) matched sample (n?=?100) psoriasis remained significantly associated with moderate/severe periodontitis and radiographic bone loss.
Within the limits of the present study, periodontitis and radiographic bone loss is more common among patients with moderate/severe psoriasis compared with the general population. This association remained significant after controlling for confounders.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25427764 View in PubMed
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Associations of instrumental activities of daily living and handgrip strength with oral self-care among home-dwelling elderly 75+.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128053
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kaija Komulainen
Pekka Ylöstalo
Anna-Maija Syrjälä
Piia Ruoppi
Matti Knuuttila
Raimo Sulkava
Sirpa Hartikainen
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Research Centre of Geriatric Care, Unit of Clinical Pharmacology and Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. kaija.komulainen@uef.fi
Source
Gerodontology. 2012 Jun;29(2):e135-42
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged, 80 and over
Cognition - physiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Plaque Index
Dentition
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Toothpastes - therapeutic use
Xerostomia - classification
Abstract
To study the associations of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and the handgrip strength with oral self-care among dentate home-dwelling elderly people in Finland.
The study analysed data for 168 dentate participants (mean age 80.6 years) in the population-based Geriatric Multidisciplinary Strategy for Good Care of the Elderly (GeMS) study. Each participant received a clinical oral examination and structured interview in 2004-2005. Functional status was assessed using the IADL scale and handgrip strength was measured using handheld dynamometry.
Study participants with high IADL (scores 7-8) had odds ratios (ORs) for brushing their teeth at least twice a day of 2.7 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.1-6.8], for using toothpaste at least twice a day of 2.0 (CI 0.8-5.2) and for having good oral hygiene of 2.8 (CI 1.0-8.3) when compared with participants with low IADL (scores =6). Participants in the upper tertiles of the handgrip strength had ORs for brushing the teeth at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.9), for using the toothpaste at least twice a day of 0.9 (CI 0.4-1.8) and for good oral hygiene of 1.1 (CI 0.5-2.4) in comparison with the study subjects in the lowest tertile of handgrip strength.
The results of this study suggest that the functional status, measured by means of the IADL scale, but not handgrip strength, is an important determinant of oral self-care among the home-dwelling elderly.
PubMed ID
22239745 View in PubMed
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[Behavior and conditions related to denture wearing in edentulous Quebecers over 60 years of age].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103339
Source
J Dent Que. 1990 Jan;27:17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1990
Author
P L Simard
R. Vallée
J M Brodeur
M. Demers
D. Lachapelle
Author Affiliation
Université Laval.
Source
J Dent Que. 1990 Jan;27:17-22
Date
Jan-1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dental Health Services - utilization
Denture, Complete - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec - epidemiology
Abstract
A study was conducted among 367 persons aged 60 and over in order to determine the type and severity of digestive and nutritional problems experienced by edentulous elderly not wearing functional dentures. This article summarizes the information collected through an interview. The data describes the prosthetic status and experience of the elderly, their use of dental services and their methods of hygiene. In addition, information is provided on the level of satisfaction relative to their dentures and the need for repair or replacement of the latter.
PubMed ID
2394868 View in PubMed
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Caries and background factors in Norwegian and immigrant 5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98819
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;38(1):19-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Tove I Wigen
Nina J Wang
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatric Dentistry and Behavioural Science, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. wigen@odont.uio.no
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2010 Feb;38(1):19-28
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Child, Preschool
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Enamel - pathology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Dentin - pathology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food Habits - classification
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Norway
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Parents - education - psychology
Prevalence
Self Concept
Social Class
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the caries status of 5-year-olds in a low caries area, and study associations between dental caries and parent-related factors: parents' education, national origin, oral health behaviours and attitudes. METHODS: The material consisted of 523 children and was a stratified random sample. Clinical and radiographic examination was performed in 2007. Enamel and dentine caries were recorded at surface level. Parents filled in questionnaires regarding socioeconomic status, their own oral health behaviours and attitudes. RESULTS: Most participants (66%) had no caries experience and 16% had enamel caries only. Dentine caries experience was present in 18% of the children, and 5% had dentine caries experience in five or more teeth. Surfaces with enamel caries constituted half of all surfaces with caries experience. In multiple logistic regression, statistically significant risk indicators for the child having dentine caries experience at the age of five were: having one or both parents of non-western origin (OR = 4.8), both parents (OR = 3.0) or one parent (OR = 2.1) with low education, parental laxness about the child's tooth brushing (OR = 2.8), parents' brushing their own teeth less than twice a day (OR = 2.2) and having parents with frequent sugar intakes (OR = 1.8). CONCLUSION: Caries prevalence in 5-year-olds was strongly associated with parent-related factors signifying that information on parents' socioeconomic status, dental behaviours and attitudes should be considered when planning dental services for young children. Our results suggest that the real high risk group is non-western children whose parents have low education.
PubMed ID
19845710 View in PubMed
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Caries experience and background factors in 4-year-old children: time trends 1967-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30526
Source
Caries Res. 2004 Mar-Apr;38(2):149-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
C. Stecksén-Blicks
K. Sunnegårdh
E. Borssén
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Paediatric Dentistry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. christina.stecksen.blicks@vll.se
Source
Caries Res. 2004 Mar-Apr;38(2):149-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Fluorides - therapeutic use
Humans
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth, Deciduous - pathology
Toothbrushing - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In cross-sectional studies conducted in 1967, 1971, 1976, 1980, 1987, 1992, 1997 and 2002, 4-year-old children in Umeå, a city in northern Sweden, were examined for dental caries and background factors such as oral hygiene habits, use of fluorides, and sugar consumption. The same methods and criteria have been used in each of the studies from 1967 to 2002. The number of children with caries had declined from 87% in 1967 to 42% in 1987, but then the decline levelled out. In 2002, 46% of the children had caries with a mean dmfs value of 2.0 +/- 3.6. Six percent of the children had 10 or more dmfs. Immigrant children had a higher caries prevalence (p
PubMed ID
14767172 View in PubMed
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Caries prevalence and oral hygiene in Lithuanian children and adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212770
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Feb;54(1):75-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
J. Aleksejuniene
P. Arneberg
H M Eriksen
Author Affiliation
Stomatological Clinic, University of Vilnius, Lithuania.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Feb;54(1):75-80
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Baltic States - epidemiology
Child
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Ethnic Groups
Female
Fluorides - analysis
Humans
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Poland - ethnology
Prevalence
Russia - ethnology
Sex Factors
Sucrose - administration & dosage
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Contrary to what is observed in many Western societies, the caries prevalence among children and adolescents in the Baltic States remains high. The aims of the present study were to describe the caries prevalence and oral hygiene among 7-, 12-, and 15-year-old Lithuanians and to correlate the caries prevalence with fluoride content in the drinking water, oral hygiene, gender, ethnicity, and pattern of sugar consumption. The investigation was based on cluster samples, and the clinical investigation was performed in accordance with criteria defined by WHO. High DMFT values were registered (mean DMFT = 1.3 among 7-year-olds; DMFT = 4.9 among 12-year-olds and 7.0 among 15-year-olds) and were associated with low fluoride content in the drinking water and poor oral hygiene. Girls showed higher DMFT values than boys. No correlation between pattern of sugar consumption and caries prevalence could be disclosed.
PubMed ID
8669245 View in PubMed
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Changing dentate status of adults, use of dental health services, and achievement of national dental health goals in Denmark by the year 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62776
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2004;64(3):127-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Poul Erik Petersen
Mette Kjøller
Lisa Bøge Christensen
Ulla Krustrup
Author Affiliation
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Dentistry, Department for Community Dentistry, Nørre Allé 20, 2200 København N, Denmark. pep@odont.ku.dk
Source
J Public Health Dent. 2004;64(3):127-35
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dentures - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Jaw, Edentulous - epidemiology
Jaw, Edentulous, Partially - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Objectives
Public Health Administration
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
World Health Organization
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study analyzes the current profile of dentate status and use of dental health services among adults in Denmark at the turn of the millennium, assesses the impact on dentate status of sociodemographic factors and use of dental health services in adulthood and in childhood, and highlights the changes over time in dental health conditions among adults. Finally, the intention of the study was to evaluate the Danish dental health care system's level of achievement of the official goals for the year 2000 as formulated by the World Health Organization and the National Board of Health. The subjects of this study included a national representative sample of 16,690 Danish citizens aged 16 years and older (response rate=74.2%). A subsample (n=3,818) took part in a survey of dental care habits in childhood and prevalence of removable dentures; 66 percent of persons selected responded. METHODS: Personal interviews were used to collect information on dentate status, use of dental health services and living conditions; data on dental care habits in childhood and prevalence of removable dentures were collected by self-administered questionnaires. RESULTS: In all, 8 percent of interviewed persons were edentulous, while 80 percent had 20 or more natural teeth. At age 65-74 years, 27 percent were edentulous and 40 percent had 20 teeth or more; 58 percent wore removable dentures. Dentate status and prevalence of dentures were highly related to educational background and income, particularly for older age groups. Among persons interviewed, 80 percent paid regular dental visits and visits were most frequent among persons of high education and income. At age 35-44 years 95 percent had participated in regular dental care in childhood compared to 49 percent of 65-74-year-olds. Multivariate analyses revealed that sociobehavioral factors had significant effects on dentate status. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to similar studies carried out in 1987 and 1994, the present survey indicates a positive trend of improved dentate status in adult Danes in general and regular use of dental health services increased considerably over time. The WHO goals for better dental health by the year 2000 were achieved for 35-44-year-olds, whereas the goal of more people with functional dentitions at age 65 years or older was not achieved. It remains a challenge to the Danish dental health system to help even out the social inequalities in dental health.
PubMed ID
15341135 View in PubMed
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Dental caries determinants in an adult Portuguese population and a comparison with Norwegian adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52769
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Feb;54(1):49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
H M Eriksen
M D Marques
E. Bjertness
B. Moe
Author Affiliation
Department of Operative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1996 Feb;54(1):49-54
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Buffers
Comparative Study
Cultural Characteristics
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Oral Hygiene - statistics & numerical data
Oral Hygiene Index
Periodontal Index
Portugal - epidemiology
Saliva - physiology
Sex Factors
Social Class
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Abstract
The present epidemiologic dental caries study indicates a high number of decayed surfaces (mean, 13.5 +/- 11.8 (SD)) in a Portuguese population of 30- to 39-year-olds from Porto. The most influential determinants for variation in carious surfaces were oral hygiene, gender, salivary buffer capacity, and missing teeth. By entering the most influential independent variables in a final multiple classification analysis, the total explained variance in carious surfaces was 27%. A comparison with results from a similar Norwegian dental health study showed that the biologic factors of importance for number of carious surfaces were the same, whereas the sociocultural determinants differed.
PubMed ID
8669241 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.