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3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101097
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Author
Macnab, AJ
Rozmus, J
Benton, D
Gagnon, FA
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Hartley Bay Nursing Station, Hartley Bay, British Columbia, Canada
Gagnon Research Associates, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal children
Brush-ins
Canada
Collaborative program
Cross-sectional study
Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score
Dental health
Educational presentations
First Nations
Fluoride application
Oral health and knowledge
Recognition/incentive scheme
School-based program
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.RESULTS: Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
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Availability and utilization of dental services by rural Manitoba children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104033
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1966 May;32(5):280-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966 May
Author
McCormick CH
Source
J Can Dent Assoc (Tor). 1966 May;32(5):280-5
Date
1966 May
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
DMF Index
Female
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Oral Health
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Awareness of periodontal disease in a group of northern Canadian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2862
Source
Pages 163-168 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
and gender differences are reported. Results indicate that girls have a better awareness of good oral health. Non- Native children have a somewhat better understanding regarding the recognition and prevention of peri- odontal disease. Both Native and non-Native groups share uncertainties with respect
  1 document  
Author
Schuller, P.D.
Thompson, G.W.
Taerum, T.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 163-168 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Health knowledge surveys
Indigenous peoples
Oral health education
Periodontal disease
Abstract
Periodontal disease destroys the supporting structures of the teeth. The clinical signs start early in childhood as inflammation of the gingival tissues; if uncontrolled, it becomes the major cause of loss of teeth in adult life. The purpose of this survey was to determine the understanding that a group of 10- to 15-year-olds living in the Inuvialuit, Gwich'in, and Sahtu Districts of the Northwest Territories have regarding the recognition and prevention of periodontal-gingival disease. A total of 953 students, with a median age of 12.5 years, completed the survey. The data, which included rural and urban centers as well as rural and remote regions, were analyzed using the chi-square method. Ethnic and gender differences are reported. Results indicate that girls have a better awareness of good oral health. Non-Native children have a somewhat better understanding regarding the recognition and prevention of periodontal disease. Both Native and non-Native groups share uncertainties with respect to the rationale and reasons behind the disease process. Educators of oral health prevention should incorporate into their programs preventive measures that take into consideration Native culture and traditions.
Documents
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Baby-bottle tooth decay: are we on the right track?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2861
Source
Pages 155-162 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
. Keywords: Baby-bottle tooth decay; Child health status; Oral health; Nutrition; Vitamin D deficiency BABY-BOTTLE TOOTH DECAY The terms baby-bottle tooth decay and nurs- ing caries are believed to represent a distinct clinical entity of known etiology. Rapid and extensive decay of the deciduous teeth
  1 document  
Author
Smith, P.J.
Moffatt, M.E.
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 155-162 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Child health status
Nutrition
Oral Health
Vitamin D deficiency
Abstract
The baby-bottle tooth decay (BBTD) risk factor literature was critically assessed for strength of evidence, and the prevention literature for the identification of which risk factors are being addressed. "Inappropriate" feeding practices (non-nutritive sucking, prolonged bottle/breast feeding, nap-time feeding) are believed to cause BBTD. The association of these practices with BBTD is inconsistent and the strength of association varies greatly. These practices increase exposure to lactose, a cariogenic carbohydrate, but the current causation model fails to explain why the majority of children with these risk factors do not develop BBTD. The association of BBTD with low socioeconomic status is stronger and more consistent. Prevention has focused almost exclusively on education directed at changing the postnatal feeding practices despite the fact that teeth begin formation in utero. Prenatal deficiencies of calcium and vitamin D can lead to enamel defects, and enamel defects in turn predispose teeth to caries. Baby-bottle tooth decay is especially prevalent in Aboriginal people, for whom studies have consistently reported diets deficient in vitamin D and calcium. BBTD may be a consequence of the poor socioeconomic conditions and malnutrition. Perhaps more attention should be given to primary prevention.
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Dental caries knowledge in a group of Northwest Territories children

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2863
Source
Pages 169-173 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
health practices and be given an opportunity to improve their oral health knowledge. Keywords: Northwest Territories; Oral health; Child health care; Indigenous peoples; Dental caries; Health knowledge surveys INTRODUCTION Dental caries rates in the Northwest Terri- tories (NWT) are higher than
  1 document  
Author
Thompson, G.W.
Schuller, P.D.
Lewis, D.W.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Source
Pages 169-173 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Child health care
Dental caries
Health knowledge surveys
Indigenous peoples
Northwest Territories
Oral Health
Abstract
A total of 953 children in schools in communities in the Northwest Territories was surveyed to determine their attitudes and knowledge about dental decay. A questionnaire was answered by these Native and non-Native children in the Northwest Territories. The median age of the children was 12.5 years. The girls tended to brush their teeth more frequently and consumed less sugared sweets between meals. More of the girls and in particular the Native girls knew about "nursing" caries. The Native students more often than not went for dental treatment when it was necessary. The Native students brushed their teeth less frequently and often learned to brush their teeth on their own. The consumption of sugared sweets between meals was greater in the Native sample. The knowledge level of the factors that affect dental decay rates was lower in the Native group, but was not extremely high in either group. These children should receive more information on oral health practices and be given an opportunity to improve their oral health knowledge.
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Dental health--a major public health problem "better weapons may change battle plans".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102611
Source
Can J Public Health. 1965 Dec;56(12):525-6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1965
Author
Connor RA
Source
Can J Public Health. 1965 Dec;56(12):525-6.
Date
Dec-1965
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Oral Health*
Public Health Dentistry*
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Source
Dental Health. 1969 Jan-Mar; 8:7-9.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
Author
Jones, A.W.
Source
Dental Health. 1969 Jan-Mar; 8:7-9.
Date
1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Makkovik
Hopedale
Nain
Health services
Dental services
Health status
Diet, general
Inuits
Medical Missions, Official
Oral Health
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2590.
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A dental hygiene student reports on delivering dental hygiene services to an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1113
Source
Canadian Dental Hygienist. 1982; 16(2):16-18.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
Hildebrand, V.
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba
Source
Canadian Dental Hygienist. 1982; 16(2):16-18.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Rankin Inlet
Dental hygiene
Dental services
Diet, western
Acculturation
Canada
Delivery of Health Care
Dental Prophylaxis
Humans
Inuits
Oral Health
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1671.
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Dental treatment provided and needed for Keewatin, Canada, children

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102294
Source
Pages 768-771 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
primary and then their permanent teeth to improve their quality of life. Far too often, programs are developed that evaluate levels of general health and nutrition without the inclusion of oral health. The general and oral health assessment of this primarily Inuit population in the Keewatin region
  1 document  
Author
Thompson, G.W
Moffatt, M.E.K
Young, T.K
O'Neil, J
Schwartz, A
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Source
Pages 768-771 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Canada
Children
Dental treatment
Diet
DMFT
Health status
Inuit
Keewatin
Northwest Territories
Oral Health
Abstract
A total of 352 children, aged 0 to 14 years, in eight communities received a dental examination as part of the comprehensive health assessment that was done in the Keewatin Region, Northwest Territories. Canada. This 20% representative sample received an oral examination that included dental caries, a periodontal assessment, and an orthodontic evaluation. Four dentists were calibrated to do the clinical examinations. The average number of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) was 5.98 teeth, with more decayed teeth (2.82) than filled (2.21). The boys in this sample tended to have a higher DMFT score, 6.31, compared to 5.68 for the girls. For the age group 3 to 5 years, the average number of primary DMFT was 8.03, with 4.32 teeth decayed and 1. 75 teeth filled. A total of 77.3% of the children required some type of dental treatment. In terms of specific treatment, 5.1% of the children needed oral surgery treatment, 20.2% orthodontic treatment, 57.7% restorative dentistry treatment, 22.4% pit and fissure sealants, and 66.2% a prophylaxis. The children in the Keewatin Region require an extensive preventive and treatment program if they are to first retain their primary and then their permanent teeth to improve their quality of life.
Documents
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The geographic pathology of dental disease in Canadian central arctic populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1669
Source
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association. 1972 Aug; 8:46/288-54/296.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
Author
McPhail, C.W.B.
Curry T.M.
Hazelton R.D.
PaynterK.J.
Williamson R.G.
Author Affiliation
University of Saskatchewan
Source
Journal of the Canadian Dental Association. 1972 Aug; 8:46/288-54/296.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Churchill
Rankin Inlet
Eskimo Point
Whale Cove
Coral Harbour
Repulse Bay
Baker Lake
Acculturation
Dental services
Dental auxiliary
Trapped upper lateral incisor
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Child
DMF Index
Demography
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Surveys
Diet
Humans
Inuits
Malocclusion - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Oral Health
Periodontal Diseases - epidemiology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2606.
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16 records – page 1 of 2.