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The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) task force recommendations for the management of patients with mood disorders and comorbid substance use disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127356
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):38-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Serge Beaulieu
Sybille Saury
Jitender Sareen
Jacques Tremblay
Christian G Schütz
Roger S McIntyre
Ayal Schaffer
Author Affiliation
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Serge.Beaulieu@McGill.ca
Source
Ann Clin Psychiatry. 2012 Feb;24(1):38-55
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Anticonvulsants - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antimanic Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Bipolar Disorder - epidemiology - therapy
Canada
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Mood Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Psychotherapy - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Mood disorders, especially bipolar disorder (BD), frequently are associated with substance use disorders (SUDs). There are well-designed trials for the treatment of SUDs in the absence of a comorbid condition. However, one cannot generalize these study results to individuals with comorbid mood disorders, because therapeutic efficacy and/or safety and tolerability profiles may differ with the presence of the comorbid disorder. Therefore, a review of the available evidence is needed to provide guidance to clinicians facing the challenges of treating patients with comorbid mood disorders and SUDs.
We reviewed the literature published between January 1966 and November 2010 by using the following search strategies on PubMed. Search terms were bipolar disorder or depressive disorder, major (to exclude depression, postpartum; dysthymic disorder; cyclothymic disorder; and seasonal affective disorder) cross-referenced with alcohol or drug or substance and abuse or dependence or disorder. When possible, a level of evidence was determined for each treatment using the framework of previous Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments recommendations. The lack of evidence-based literature limited the authors' ability to generate treatment recommendations that were strictly evidence based, and as such, recommendations were often based on the authors' opinion.
Even though a large number of treatments were investigated for alcohol use disorder (AUD), none have been sufficiently studied to justify the attribution of level 1 evidence in comorbid AUD with major depressive disorder (MDD) or BD. The available data allows us to generate first-choice recommendations for AUD comorbid with MDD and only third-choice recommendations for cocaine, heroin, and opiate SUD comorbid with MDD. No recommendations were possible for cannabis, amphetamines, methamphetamines, or polysubstance SUD comorbid with MDD. First-choice recommendations were possible for alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine SUD comorbid with BD and only second-choice recommendations for heroin, amphetamine, methamphetamine, and polysubstance SUD comorbid with BD. No recommendations were possible for opiate SUD comorbid with BD. Finally, psychotherapies certainly are considered an essential component of the overall treatment of SUDs comorbid with mood disorders. However, further well-designed studies are needed in order to properly assess their potential role in specific SUDs comorbid with a mood disorder.
Although certain treatments show promise in the management of mood disorders comorbid with SUDs, additional well-designed studies are needed to properly assess their potential role in specific SUDs comorbid with a mood disorder.
PubMed ID
22303521 View in PubMed
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[Mental health of children and adolescents and present-day tasks of organizing specialized mental care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195750
Source
Med Tekh. 2000 Nov-Dec;(6):3-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
N E Mironov
Source
Med Tekh. 2000 Nov-Dec;(6):3-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcoholism - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Humans
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology - therapy
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Russia - epidemiology
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
The paper analyzes the characteristics of the mental health status of children and adolescents by taking into account drug abuse and mental health in schoolchildren. The specific features of care delivered to children with intellectual impairments are considered.
PubMed ID
11204635 View in PubMed
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The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI): profile of participants in North America's first trial of heroin-assisted treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155427
Source
J Urban Health. 2008 Nov;85(6):812-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Eugenia Oviedo-Joekes
Bohdan Nosyk
Suzanne Brissette
Jill Chettiar
Pascal Schneeberger
David C Marsh
Michael Krausz
Aslam Anis
Martin T Schechter
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. eugenia@mail.cheos.ubc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2008 Nov;85(6):812-25
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Drug Users - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health status
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Needle Sharing - statistics & numerical data
Opioid-Related Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Research Subjects
Risk-Taking
Sex Distribution
Social Isolation
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - therapy
Treatment Failure
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) is a randomized controlled trial evaluating the feasibility and effectiveness of heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) in the Canadian context. Our objective is to analyze the profile of the NAOMI participant cohort in the context of illicit opioid use in Canada and to evaluate its comparability with patient profiles of European HAT studies. Recruitment began in February 2005 and ended in March 2007. Inclusion criteria included opioid dependence, 5 or more years of opioid use, regular opioid injection, and at least two previous opiate addiction treatment attempts. Standardized assessment instruments such as the European Addiction Severity Index and the Maudsley Addiction Profile were employed. A total of 251 individuals were randomized from Vancouver, BC (192, 76.5%), and Montreal, Quebec (59, 23.5%); 38.5% were female, the mean age was 39.7 years (SD:8.6), and participants had injected drugs for 16.5 years (SD:9.9), on average. In the prior month, heroin was used a mean of 26.5 days (SD:7.4) and cocaine 16 days (SD;12.6). Vancouver had significantly more patients residing in unstable housing (88.5 vs. 22%; p
Notes
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PubMed ID
18758964 View in PubMed
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