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Assessment of the outcome of ophthalmological screening for uveitis in a cohort of Swedish children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288051
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2017 Nov;95(7):741-747
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Maria Papadopoulou
Madeleine Zetterberg
Solveig Oskarsdottir
Marita Andersson Grönlund
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2017 Nov;95(7):741-747
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arthritis, Juvenile - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Infant
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Ophthalmology - methods
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Uveitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To describe clinical features, risk factors and complications in a cohort of Swedish children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) screened for uveitis between 2002 and 2011.
Medical records of 299 children with JIA (93 male, 206 female; median age 5.0 years at diagnosis) were retrospectively scrutinized focusing on subtype of JIA, onset of arthritis/uveitis, presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and ophthalmological status.
Uveitis was found in 32 (11%) children, 78% bilaterally affected. The median age of arthritis onset in children who developed uveitis was 2.5 years (range 1-10) versus 5.0 years (range 1-15) in those who did not. Sex ratio was 3.5:1 (girl:boy). The most prevalent JIA subtype was oligoarthritis (75%). All but one child with uveitis was found to be ANA (+). The median interval between diagnosis of arthritis and uveitis was 12 months. Only one child developed uveitis between the fourth and fifth years after arthritis onset. Ocular complications were recorded in 45.6% (26/57 affected eyes) at last follow-up. On univariate analysis, both young age at arthritis onset and ANA positivity were possible predictors for developing uveitis, but on multivariate analysis, the latter was the most important predictor (HR 16.25, 95%; CI 2.19-120.44; p = 0.006, Cox regression analysis).
Almost all of the children developing JIA-associated uveitis did so within 4 years after arthritis onset, a fact that accentuates the importance of early initiation of ophthalmological screening and more frequent regular follow-ups during the first 4 years. The most important predictor for developing uveitis was ANA positivity.
PubMed ID
28205413 View in PubMed
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Dismantling sociocultural barriers to eye care with tele-ophthalmology: lessons from an Alberta Cree community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115092
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2013;36(2):E57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sourabh Arora
Ayaz K Kurji
Matthew T S Tennant
Author Affiliation
Royal Alexandra Hospital, University of Alberta, Department of Ophthalmology, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Clin Invest Med. 2013;36(2):E57-63
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Cultural Characteristics
Cultural Competency
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - therapy
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis - therapy
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Language
Ophthalmology - methods
Patient Participation
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Spiritual Therapies
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
There are significant disparities in access to health care amongst Aboriginal Canadians. The purpose of this study was to determine whether tele-ophthalmology services, provided to Aboriginal Canadians in a culturally-sensitive community-based clinic, could overcome social and cultural barriers in ways that would be difficult in the traditional hospital-based setting.
The Aboriginal Diabetes Wellness Program of Alberta incorporates culturally-sensitive health-related activities and rituals as a component of a diabetic retinopathy tele-ophthalmology screening program. Metrics of program attendance were collected while stakeholders participated in a survey to identify barriers to healthcare delivery.
Aboriginal patients, cultural liaison, nurses and program administrators revealed economic, geographic, social and cultural barriers to healthcare faced by Aboriginal people. It was found that the introduction of culturally-sensitive programs led to increased appointment attendance; from 25% to 85%. Involvement of Aboriginal nurses, inclusion of culturally-sensitive activities and participation in spiritual ceremonies led to qualitative accounts of increased patient satisfaction, trust towards the healthcare team and communication amongst participants.
A culturally-sensitive model of healthcare delivery in a community-based health clinic improved access to tele-ophthalmology services. This was demonstrated by increased attendance at appointments and increased satisfaction amongst patients.
PubMed ID
23544606 View in PubMed
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[Eye care management in Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261190
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2014 Nov-Dec;130(6):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
V V Neroev
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2014 Nov-Dec;130(6):8-12
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Efficiency, Organizational
Eye Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Government Regulation
Health Priorities
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Administration - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Incidence
Ophthalmology - methods - organization & administration
Russia
Abstract
The article presents an analysis of Russian eye care performance indicators based on federal and sector statistics over the recent years provided by the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, that is the incidence of eye diseases, eye care equipment provision, inpatient and outpatient volumes. Legal acts of the Russian Federation on health system in general and eye care in particular were taken into consideration when preparing the section on organizational matters. Problems of human resources, efficiency of specialists' time management, hospital beds use, and administrative issues in particular regions and Russia as a whole are discussed.
PubMed ID
25715546 View in PubMed
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Guidelines for screening examinations for retinopathy of prematurity. Canadian Association of Pediatric Ophthalmologists Ad Hoc Committee on Standards of Screening Examination for Retinopathy of Prematurity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197443
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2000 Aug;35(5):251-2; discussion 253-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000

Health literacy in Canada and the ophthalmology patient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126994
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2012 Feb;47(1):72-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Kari L Visscher
Cindy M L Hutnik
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, Schulich School of Medicine, Department of Medical Imaging, London, Ont. kvissche@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2012 Feb;47(1):72-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy - methods - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Information Dissemination
Ophthalmology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation - methods
Physician-Patient Relations
Abstract
Health literacy represents the cognitive and social skills that determine the motivation and ability of individuals to gain access to, understand, and use information in ways that promote and maintain good health.(1) According to the 2003 International Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (IALSS), over 12 million (60%) adult Canadians lack the capacity to obtain, understand, and act on health information and services, as well as make appropriate health decisions on their own.(2,3) Of these 12 million Canadians, the elderly are the most health illiterate age group in Canada. What this suggests for Canadian physicians is that to improve the CanMEDS roles of communicator and health advocate,(4) physicians need to recognize health literacy as a modifiable contributor of poor health outcomes and work to remove literacy-related barriers.(5) This is particularly important for ophthalmologists who manage chronic illnesses in elderly patients.(2,6,7) The objective of this review is 2-fold. The first objective is to describe health literacy in Canada and provide a summary on the current state of health literacy research, both generally in medicine and specifically to Ophthalmology. The second objective is to propose a 3-step approach of evidence based techniques for managing low health literate patients in clinic.
PubMed ID
22333856 View in PubMed
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Incidence of blindness and visual impairment in diabetic patients participating in an ophthalmological control and screening programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34538
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Dec;74(6):533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M. Henricsson
M. Tyrberg
A. Heijl
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Helsingborg Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Dec;74(6):533-8
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Blindness - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - blood
Diabetic Retinopathy - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - complications
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ophthalmology - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Vision Screening
Visual acuity
Abstract
We studied the incidence of blindness and visual impairment in patients who were enrolled in a photographic control- and screening program for diabetic retinopathy. The study cohort consisted of 2133 patients examined between January 1990 and December 1992 and followed until October 1st 1995. The occurrence of blindness (visual acuity or = 8.5%, were associated with a 65% increase in risk of blindness/visual impairment (95% confidence interval 14-130%). Retinopathy was the major cause of blindness and visual impairment in patients with diabetes. The study revealed a low incidence of blindness, which is in line with recent reports. Control of hyperglycaemia may be of value for the prevention of visual loss.
PubMed ID
9017036 View in PubMed
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JPEG compression of stereoscopic digital images for the diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy via teleophthalmology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47118
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2004 Dec;39(7):746-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Chad F Baker
Christopher J Rudnisky
Matthew T S Tennant
Paul Sanghera
Bradley J Hinz
Alexander R De Leon
Mark D J Greve
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2004 Dec;39(7):746-54
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Compression - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Diabetic Retinopathy - diagnosis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - methods
Photography - methods
Pilot Projects
Remote Consultation - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retina - pathology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Canada's vast size and remote rural communities represent a significant hurdle for successful monitoring and evaluation of diabetic retinopathy.Teleophthalmology may provide a solution to overcome this problem. We investigated the application of Joint Photographic Experts Group (PEG) compression to digital retinal images to determine whether JPEG compression could reduce file sizes while maintaining sufficient quality and detail to accurately diagnose diabetic retinopathy. METHODS: All 20 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus assessed at a 1-day teleophthalmology clinic in northern Alberta were enrolled in the study. Following pupil dilation, seven 30 degrees fields of each fundus were digitally photographed at a resolution of 2008 x 3040 pixels and saved in uncompressed tagged image file format (TIFF). The files were compressed approximately 55x and 113x their original size using JPEG compression. A reviewer in Edmonton randomly viewed all original TIFF images along with the compressed JPEG images in a masked fashion for image quality and for specific diabetic retinal pathology in accordance with Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study standards. The level of diabetic retinopathy and recommendations for clinical follow-up were also recorded. Exact agreement and weighted kappa statistics, a measure of reproducibility, were calculated. RESULTS: Exact agreement between the compressed JPEG images and the TIFF images was high (75% to 100%) for all measured variables at both compression levels. Reproducibility was good to excellent at both compression levels for the identification of diabetic retinal abnormalities (K = 0.45-1), diagnosis of level of retinopathy (kappa = 0.73-1) and recommended follow-up (kappa = 0.64-1). INTERPRETATION:The application of JPEG compression at ratios of 55:1 and 113:1 did not significantly interfere with the identification of specific diabetic retinal pathology, diagnosis of level of retinopathy or recommended follow-up. These results indicate that JPEG compression at ratios as high as 113:1 has the potential to reduce storage requirements without interfering with the accurate and reproducible teleophthalmologic diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy.This pilot project demonstrates the potential for JPEG compression within a digital teleophthalmology viewing system.
PubMed ID
15696764 View in PubMed
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Management of optic neuritis and impact of clinical trials: an international survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91617
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2009 Jan 15;276(1-2):69-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2009
Author
Biousse Valérie
Calvetti Olivier
Drews-Botsch Carolyn D
Atkins Edward J
Sathornsumetee Busaba
Newman Nancy J
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. vbiouss@emory.edu
Source
J Neurol Sci. 2009 Jan 15;276(1-2):69-74
Date
Jan-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials as Topic
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
International Cooperation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Neurology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Ophthalmology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Optic Neuritis - diagnosis - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: 1) To evaluate the management of acute isolated optic neuritis (ON) by ophthalmologists and neurologists; 2) to evaluate the impact of clinical trials; 3) to compare these practices among 7 countries. METHODS: A survey on diagnosis and treatment of acute isolated ON was sent to 5,443 neurologists and 6,099 ophthalmologists in the southeast-USA, Canada, Australia/New Zealand, Denmark, France, and Thailand. USA data were compared to those of other countries. RESULTS: We collected 3,142 surveys (1,449 neurologists/1,693 ophthalmologists) (29.8% response rate). In all countries, ON patients more frequently presented to ophthalmologists, and were subsequently referred to neurologists or subspecialists. Evaluation and management of ON varied among countries, mostly because of variations in healthcare systems, imaging access, and local guidelines. A brain MRI was obtained for 70-80% of ON patients; lumbar punctures were obtained mostly in Europe and Thailand. Although most patients received acute treatment with intravenous steroids, between 14% and 65% of neurologists and ophthalmologists still recommended oral prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for the treatment of acute isolated ON. In all countries, steroids were often prescribed to improve visual outcome or to decrease the long-term risk of multiple sclerosis. INTERPRETATION: Although recent clinical trials have changed the management of acute ON around the world, many neurologists and ophthalmologists do not evaluate and treat acute ON patients according to the best evidence from clinical research. This confirms that evaluation of the impact of major clinical trials ("translational T2 clinical research") is essential when assessing the effects of interventions designed to improve quality of care.
PubMed ID
18926549 View in PubMed
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Management of optic neuritis in Canada: survey of ophthalmologists and neurologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156525
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2008 May;35(2):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Edward J Atkins
Carolyn D Drews-Botsch
Nancy J Newman
Olivier Calvetti
Seegar Swanson
Valérie Biousse
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2008 May;35(2):179-84
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Neurology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Ophthalmology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Optic Neuritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Acute isolated optic neuritis is often the first manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS), and its management remains controversial. Over the past decade, with the advent of new disease-modifying agents, management of isolated optic neuritis has become more complicated.
To evaluate the current practice patterns of Canadian ophthalmologists and neurologists in the management of acute optic neuritis, and to evaluate the impact of recently published randomized clinical trials.
Mail survey.
All practicing ophthalmologists and neurologists in Canada were mailed a survey evaluating the management of isolated acute optic neuritis and familiarity with recent clinical trials. Surveys for 1158 were mailed, and completed surveys were collected anonymously through a datafax system. Second and third mailings were sent to non-respondents 6 and 12 weeks later.
The final response rate was 34.5%. Although many acute optic neuritis patients initially present to ophthalmologists, neurologists are the physicians primarily managing these patients. Ordering magnetic resonance imaging, and treating with high dose intravenous steroids has become the standard of care. However, 15% of physicians (14% of ophthalmologists and 16% of neurologists) continue to prescribe low dose oral steroids, and steroids are being given for reasons other than to shorten the duration of visual symptoms by 73% of ophthalmologists and 50% of neurologists. More neurologists than ophthalmologists are familiar with recent clinical trials involving disease-modifying agents.
Although the management of acute optic neuritis has been evaluated in large clinical trials that were published in major international journals, some ophthalmologists and neurologists are not following evidence-based recommendations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18574931 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.