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33 records – page 1 of 4.

Academic screencasting: internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137424
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Roshan Razik
Zaid Mammo
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Internship and Residency
Ontario
Ophthalmology - education
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Teaching Rounds - methods
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey.
The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations-screencasts-were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p
PubMed ID
21283162 View in PubMed
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An analysis of undergraduate ophthalmology training in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148287
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):513-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jason Noble
Kirandeep Somal
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):513-8
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - standards
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To investigate the adequacy of undergraduate ophthalmology education in Canada in comparison with the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) guidelines.
Cross-sectional survey.
First-year residents who had graduated from Canadian medical schools.
Eligible residents were invited to participate in an online survey in 2007. Data were categorized by demographic variables, and basic statistics were done.
Responses were obtained from 386 of the 1425 individuals (27.0%) contacted. The majority (64.0%) stated they had "too little" or "no exposure" to ophthalmology in medical school. The majority (76.2%) of respondents stated that they had had 1 week or less of overall exposure to ophthalmology. Sufficient exposure to several ICO core subspecialty areas was reported, including lens/cataract (81.1%) and cornea/external diseases (81.6%); however, some areas did not receive adequate time allocation, such as vitreoretinal disease (41.9%). Similarly, competency was obtained in certain ICO examination skills, including assessment of visual acuity (83.3%) and pupillary reflexes (90.7%) but was not achieved for other skills, such as fundoscopy (52.3%), slit-lamp examination (44.8%), and intraocular pressure assessment (19.9%). When asked whether sufficient ophthalmology knowledge and skills had been obtained during medical school, only 42.9% and 25.9% agreed, respectively.
Undergraduate ophthalmology training in Canada contains gaps in certain key areas. Developing a national, standardized curriculum could ensure that medical students acquire competency in the ophthalmology knowledge and skills required for future clinical practice.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):499-50119789578
PubMed ID
19789584 View in PubMed
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Canadian Ophthalmological Society practice guidelines for refractive surgery. Canadian Ophthalmological Society Working Group on Refractive Surgery Practice Guidelines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196522
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2000 Oct;35(6):307-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000

Canadian ophthalmology residency training: an evaluation of resident satisfaction and comparison with international standards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148285
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):540-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Alysia W Zhou
Jason Noble
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ont.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):540-7
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Competency-Based Education
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Educational Status
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internationality
Internship and Residency - standards
Male
Ophthalmology - education
Professional Practice
Questionnaires
Teaching - standards
Abstract
To evaluate the adequacy of Canadian ophthalmology residency programs in achieving the competencies outlined by the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) and to assess residents' satisfaction with their training programs.
Canadian residents enrolled in the final 2 years of English and French ophthalmology programs, as well as recent graduates from 2005 to 2008.
Graduates and eligible residents were invited to participate in the 43-item survey during the autumn of 2008. Data were categorized by demographic variables, and basic statistics were done.
Of the 99 individuals surveyed, 40 (40%) responded, representing 26 current residents and 14 graduates. The vast majority (85%) of respondents were satisfied with their residency program. Clinic-based training was generally rated satisfactorily; however, respondents reported insufficient exposure to low-vision rehabilitation (77.5%), refraction and glasses prescription (65%), and neuro-ophthalmology (45%). Respondents were similarly satisfied with their surgical experiences, most of them (>60%) rating case volume, complexity, and variety as satisfactory or better. However, many stated that they had insufficient exposure to extracapsular cataract extraction (72.5%), refractive surgery (72.5%), and orbital surgery (57.5%). Of the graduates surveyed, all passed their Royal College licensing examinations on the first attempt and felt that residency adequately prepared them for the examinations. They reported insufficient training in certain nonclinical areas, such as practice management, and staffing and administration skills.
Canadian ophthalmology residents express high levels of satisfaction with their residency training programs. Although most programs appear to adequately address most ICO core objectives, certain curriculum modifications are required.
PubMed ID
19789589 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of the impact of certified and noncertified ophthalmic medical personnel on practice quality and productivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159454
Source
Eye Contact Lens. 2008 Jan;34(1):28-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Kenneth E Woodworth
Peter C Donshik
William H Ehlers
David J Pucel
Lynn D Anderson
Nathan A Thompson
Author Affiliation
Kentucky Eye Institute, Lexington, KY, USA.
Source
Eye Contact Lens. 2008 Jan;34(1):28-34
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Certification
Clinical Competence - standards
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Efficiency
Humans
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - education - standards
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
To compare ophthalmic practice productivity and performance attributes, as rated by employing ophthalmologists, of noncertified and three levels of certified ophthalmic medical personnel.
Three hundred eighty-five American and Canadian ophthalmologists in a clinic-based, stratified, random sample were surveyed regarding productivity performance and attributes of the ophthalmic medical personnel they employ. Instrument scales assessed 14 desirable professional attributes and 10 practice productivity measures. The attributes were credibility, reliability, competence, quality assurance, quality of patient care, knowledge base to make adjustments, increased skills (expertise), ability to work independently, broader knowledge base, ability to detect errors, ability to be trained to perform multiple roles in the practice, professional image, good judgment, and initiative and drive. The productivity measures were patient satisfaction, doctor productivity, trouble-shooting rapport, triage screening, effective patient flow, reduced patient complaints, increased referrals, number of patients per hour, revenue per patient, and patient follow-up. Participants indicated whether certified personnel more often showed these attributes and contributed to practice productivity measures as compared to noncertified personnel or whether there was no difference. Results were analyzed with a chi-square goodness-of-fit test. Survey reliability and validity were evaluated.
Significantly more ophthalmologists responded that the three levels of certified personnel contributed more to 5 of the 10 practice productivity measures (i.e., doctor productivity, trouble-shooting rapport, triage screening, effective patient flow, and number of patients per hour). A statistically significant number of ophthalmologists also believed that certified personnel showed more of all 14 of the personal attributes considered desirable compared to noncertified ophthalmic medical personnel.
Compared to noncertified personnel, the employment of certified ophthalmic personnel enhances the quality and productivity of an ophthalmic practice. Overall practice productivity is increased with certified ophthalmic medical personnel.
PubMed ID
18180680 View in PubMed
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Computer-assisted instruction in emergency ophthalmological care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220955
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Jun;71(3):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
B. Lönwe
A. Heijl
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Lund, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1993 Jun;71(3):289-95
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Computer simulation
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Educational Measurement
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Eye Diseases - diagnosis
Humans
Ophthalmology - education
Sweden
Abstract
The use of computer-assisted instruction in medical education has increased steadily in the last decade with the availability of personal computers. Many computer-assisted instruction programs train the user to handle various forms of disease or injury. Our intent was to provide medical students with more experience in managing ophthalmological emergencies, and we therefore designed a computerized teaching system for emergency ophthalmological care. The system makes it possible for inexperienced students to develop these skills, without jeopardizing the patient's health during training. Colour illustrations help teach the student to judge clinical signs. First, two classes of altogether 35 students used the teaching system. The students were shown to have gained significantly better knowledge of conditions which had been presented to them by the computerized teaching, than of conditions which had not been presented in this way. After having used the system, two other classes were asked about their attitudes towards this teaching modality. A majority regarded it as a valuable or very valuable addition to traditional methods of teaching. This type of instruction system may improve the quality of ophthalmic teaching without increasing teaching staff requirements.
PubMed ID
8362625 View in PubMed
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Consent to cataract surgery performed by residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175299
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2005 Feb;40(1):34-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Tuong-Nam Nguyen
David Silver
Bryan Arthurs
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Que.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2005 Feb;40(1):34-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Competence
Ethics, Medical
Health Surveys
Hospitals, University
Humans
Informed Consent - statistics & numerical data
Internship and Residency
Ophthalmology - education
Physician-Patient Relations
Quebec
Questionnaires
Teaching
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
Surgical teaching seems to be in conflict with the contract between surgeon and patient. We carried out a study to determine the prevalence of consistent disclosure to patients that a resident will perform part or all of their cataract surgery procedure. A second objective was to investigate the effect of such disclosure on patients' willingness to undergo the procedure.
We sent a survey to all 20 ophthalmologists working in our university-affiliated hospitals, inquiring about their practice of disclosure to patients regarding residents' involvement in surgery. Staff physicians were also asked to record their patients' consent to an operation performed partly or entirely by a trainee while under supervision.
Of the 20 surveys sent, only 5 (25%) were returned. Those who declined to participate in the study mentioned several reasons, including that such disclosure might increase a patient's anxiety level, that they might lose potential patients as patients might be reluctant to have trainees perform their surgery, and lack of time to talk to patients about these issues. Of the five ophthalmologists who completed the survey, four were part-time affiliated staff and one was a geographic full-time physician working in our institution. Four of the five ophthalmologists said that they do not consistently disclose residents' involvement to their patients. Of the 49 patients enrolled, only 8 (16%) agreed to undergo the procedure after being informed that a trainee would be actively involved.
It is crucial to inform patients that residents may be involved in their surgery in order to avoid possible litigation. However, our results suggest that such disclosure may have a negative effect on surgical education because it could limit the number of cases available to trainees.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2005 Dec;40(6):69016518895
PubMed ID
15825527 View in PubMed
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[Continued rapid development in cataract surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224874
Source
Nord Med. 1992;107(12):302-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992

The effect of two grading systems on the performance of medical students during oral examinations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280909
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Mar;64(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Shakoor Ba-Ali
Gregor B E Jemec
Birgit Sander
Peter B Toft
Preben Homøe
Henrik Lund-Andersen
Source
Dan Med J. 2017 Mar;64(3)
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark
Dermatology - education
Education, Medical - methods
Educational Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ophthalmology - education
Otolaryngology - education
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
Either a pass/fail approach or a seven-point grading scale are used to evaluate students at the Danish universities. The aim of this study was to explore any effect of the assessment methods on student performances during oral exams.
In a prospective study including 1,037 examinations in three medical subjects, we investigated the difference in the test scores between the spring- and autumn semester. In the spring semester, the students could either pass or fail the subject (pass/fail) while in the following autumn semester, the students were assessed by tiered grading (seven-point grading scale). Unknown to the students, the examiners assessed the students by the seven-point grading scale also in the spring semester. Students at the international classes who were officially assessed by the seven-point grading scale during both semesters served as control group.
The grading scores were significantly higher among students who were aware of being evaluated with the seven-point grading scores compared with the pass/fail group (p
PubMed ID
28260593 View in PubMed
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33 records – page 1 of 4.