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333 records – page 1 of 34.

1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2003 Oct-Dec;18(4):278-9015310039
Cites: Disaster Manag Response. 2005 Jan-Mar;3(1):11-615627125
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 May;172(5):471-717521092
Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;23(2):144-51; discussion 152-318557294
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):9-1019557952
Cites: Science. 2010 Feb 5;327(5966):638-920133550
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Cites: Prehosp Disaster Med. 2009 Jan-Feb;24(1):3-819557951
PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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2nd National Survey Report. Expanded role of the operating room nurse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218670
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1994 Mar-Apr;12(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article

10 years of perioperative nursing certification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170776
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 2005 Dec;23(4):18-9, 24-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005

Acceptance of RNFA by surgeons and staff overwhelming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203416
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
S. Carver
K. Allen
Author Affiliation
Brantford General Hospital, Ontario.
Source
Can Oper Room Nurs J. 1998 Mar;16(1):30
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Operating Room Nursing - trends
Physician-Nurse Relations
PubMed ID
9883118 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aerobiology in the operating room--a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233569
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A. Hambraeus
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Bacteriology, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Bacteriological Techniques
Clothing
Humans
Operating Rooms - standards
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Sweden
Temperature
Ultraviolet Rays
Ventilation
PubMed ID
2896749 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Air quality and microbiologic contamination in operating theatres].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204398
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3148-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-1998
Author
B M Andersen
R T Røed
N. Solheim
F. Levy
A. Bratteberg
K. Kristoffersen
I. Moløkken
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for sykdomsforebygging hos risikogrupper, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Aug 30;118(20):3148-51
Date
Aug-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Conditioning
Air Microbiology
Air pollution, indoor
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Colony Count, Microbial
Humans
Norway
Operating Rooms
Particle Size
Thoracic Surgical Procedures
Urologic Surgical Procedures
Ventilation
Abstract
The present study concerns the air quality and microbiological contamination in two newly built operating theatres; one with laminar air flow (LAF) equipment for cardio-thoracic operations, and one with conventional ventilation for urological operations. Both theatres had an identical number of air exchanges (17/h), identical microclimatic conditions and they employed the same cleaning procedures. In the LAF-ventilated operating theatre bacterial contamination of the air was effectively reduced to less than 10 colony-forming units (CFU)/m3 in all 125 samples (1 m3 per sample) tested. In most samples, 118/125, the bacterial count was less than 5 CFU/m3, despite the presence of ten persons. The conventionally ventilated theatre reached values up to 120 CFU/m3 during the most active period of the day when approximately seven persons were present. The LAF ventilation reduced both the content of particles in the air and contamination by bacteria on the floor. In both theatres cleaning procedures had only a low impact on CFU in the air and on the floor. The use of diathermia markedly increased the level of small particles in the air, and this may influence the air quality in the operating theatres.
PubMed ID
9760859 View in PubMed
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Alaska's obstetrical delivery systems: a descriptive epidemiologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4519
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):78-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
D W Smith
N J Murphy
Author Affiliation
University of Washington School of Medicine, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA. dsmith@afpr.fammed.washington.edu
Source
Alaska Med. 2000 Jul-Sep;42(3):78-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Anesthesia, Obstetrical
Cesarean Section
Comparative Study
Delivery, Obstetric - methods
Emergencies
Female
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Obstetrics - manpower
Operating Rooms
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Population
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
Delivery of obstetrical care in rural Alaska can be very challenging, due to remoteness, lack of medical resources and transportation difficulties. This descriptive study looks at what the current delivery systems for obstetrical care in Alaska are. Alaska's obstetrical delivery systems can be divided into three basic systems. 1) Full comprehensive obstetrical care limited only by lack of neonatal ICU capability. 2) Cesarean delivery capable, but with limited resources. 3) Low risk vaginal deliveries with no cesarean delivery capability except by transports approaching 6 hours. This study raises questions about which system is most effective for which communities. Further studies need to be undertaken to better understand how to provide effective obstetrical care in rural and bush Alaska at an acceptable risk, and at reasonable cost.
PubMed ID
11042940 View in PubMed
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Allocation of tasks between anesthesiologists and anesthesia nurses in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167401
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2006 Jul;50(6):659-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
A. Vakkuri
M. Niskanen
O A Meretoja
S. Alahuhta
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Surgical Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. anne.vakkuri@hus.fi
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2006 Jul;50(6):659-63
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, General
Anesthesiology - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal
Medically underserved area
Nurses
Operating Rooms - manpower - organization & administration
Physicians
Questionnaires
Abstract
The shortage of anesthesiologists in Finland is worsening. A survey was carried out in 2003 among head anesthesiologists and head nurses to clarify current practice and the potentials for reorganizing tasks between anesthesiologists and anesthesia nurses. A national working group analyzed the results.
A questionnaire concerning doctor and nurse resources in anesthesiology, current allocation of tasks, and opinions on how these tasks could be reallocated was sent to 87 head anesthesiologists and 32 head nurses in 45 different hospitals. The answers from the doctors and nurses were compared.
The response rate of doctors and nurses was 87% and 100%, respectively. In the enrolled hospitals there were 64 unoccupied positions for specialists in anesthesiology. The ratio of anesthesiologists to operation rooms (OR) they attended varied between 0.3 and 1.5. Doctors and nurses reported the allocation of tasks quite similarly. The great majority of respondents considered spinal, epidural, and interscalene brachial plexus blocks, and the induction of general anesthesia to be tasks that should be performed by an anesthesiologist. Very few respondents of either profession were willing to reallocate tasks so that nurses could deliver general anesthesia, including endotracheal intubation, even in low-risk patients.
Nurses could be trained nationwide to perform procedures already performed by locally trained nurses in some hospitals. To cope with the shortage of anesthesiologists, other strategies must be adopted in addition to transferring part of their work load to nurses.
PubMed ID
16987358 View in PubMed
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[Ambulatory surgery for cataract has now become routine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234314
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1987 Dec 16;87(51):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1987
Author
L. Nordgren
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1987 Dec 16;87(51):14-6
Date
Dec-16-1987
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Cataract Extraction
Denmark
Humans
Operating Room Nursing
PubMed ID
3438844 View in PubMed
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333 records – page 1 of 34.