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Agreement between proxy- and case-reported information obtained using the self- administered Ontario Familial Colon Cancer Registry epidemiologic questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185270
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003;24(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Victoria Nadalin
Michelle Cotterchio
Gail McKeown-Eyssen
Steven Gallinger
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Research Unit, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2003;24(1):1-8
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Data Collection - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Proxy
Questionnaires
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Registries
Abstract
Case-control studies of fatal cancers often rely on proxy respondents. Therefore, it is important to determine the completeness and accuracy of proxy-reported information. We evaluated proxy reports using the Ontario Familial Colon Cancer Registry epidemiology questionnaire. A proxy questionnaire was completed by spouses or relatives identified by a sample of participating cases. Item non-response and percentage agreement (between case and proxy reports) were assessed. More than 30% of proxies were unable to report on physical activity, gynecological surgery, alcohol intake, weight 20 years ago, and oral contraceptive use. Proxy reports of medical history and bowel screening varied, the percentage missing ranging from 5% for diabetes to 44% for familial polyposis in the case of medical history, and from 4% for colonoscopy to 27% for hemoccult tests in the case of screening. Agreement between case and proxy report was good to excellent for colonic screening, most medical history, and for reproductive, medication and vitamin use variables (74% to 100%). It is useful to collect proxy information on such variables as medical history, parity, colonic screening and vitamin use, whereas oral contraceptive use and previous weight are not well reported.
PubMed ID
12757630 View in PubMed
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Allergies are associated with reduced pancreas cancer risk: A population-based case-control study in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162881
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Nov 15;121(10):2241-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2007
Author
Ayelet Eppel
Michelle Cotterchio
Steven Gallinger
Author Affiliation
Familial Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry, Digestive Diseases Clinical Research Centre, Joseph and Wolf Lebovic Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. aeppel@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
Int J Cancer. 2007 Nov 15;121(10):2241-5
Date
Nov-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the deadliest cancers with mortality rates almost equaling incidence rates. Each year, approximately 3,500 Canadians are diagnosed with this disease. Although somewhat inconsistent, epidemiological studies have found that allergies are associated with a reduced pancreas cancer risk while there appears to be no association with asthma. These associations were evaluated in a population-based case-control study conducted in Ontario. Incident cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR), and diagnosed April 1, 2003 to June 1, 2006, were recruited by the Ontario Pancreas Cancer Study (OPCS). Controls were recruited from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry (OFCCR). Data on 276 cases and 378 controls were available for the current study. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to obtain age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR) estimates. Ever having allergies or hayfever was associated with reduced pancreas cancer risk (OR = 0.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.29-0.63). There was no association observed between a history of asthma and pancreas cancer risk. Findings are of great importance to understanding the biological mechanisms involved in pancreas cancer development.
PubMed ID
17582608 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medication use and breast cancer risk: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182324
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Dec;32(6):961-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Allan Steingart
Michelle Cotterchio
Nancy Kreiger
Margaret Sloan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Dec;32(6):961-6
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Fibrocystic Breast Disease - complications
Humans
Menopause
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Parity
Abstract
Animal and human studies have reported an association between antidepressant (AD) medication use and breast cancer risk. A population-based case-control study was designed specifically to examine this association among women in Ontario, Canada.
The Ontario Cancer Registry (OCR) identified women diagnosed with primary breast cancer. Controls, randomly sampled from the female population of Ontario, were frequency matched by 5-year age groups. A mailed self-administered questionnaire included questions about lifetime use of AD and potential confounders. Multivariate logistic regression yielded odds ratio estimates.
'Ever' use of AD was reported by 14% (441/3077) cases versus 12% (372/2994) controls. The age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for 'ever' use was 1.17, (95% CI: 1.01, 1.36). An increased risk was also observed for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors = 1.33 (95% CI: 1.07, 1.66), Sertraline = 1.58 (95% CI: 1.03, 2.41), and Paroxetine = 1.55 (95% CI: 1.00, 2.40). None of the 30 variables assessed for confounding altered the risk estimate by more than 10%. Multivariate adjustment including all possible breast cancer risk factors yielded an unchanged, but not significant, point estimate (MVOR = 1.2, 95% CI: 0.96, 1.51). No relationship was observed for duration or timing of AD use.
A modest association between 'ever' use of AD and breast cancer was found using the most parsimonious multivariate model. OR estimates did not change, but CI were widened and statistical significance lost, after adjustment for factors associated with breast cancer risk.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Dec;32(6):966-714681257
PubMed ID
14681256 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant medication use and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk: no association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178524
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Sep 15;160(6):566-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2004
Author
Saira Bahl
Michelle Cotterchio
Nancy Kreiger
Neil Klar
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Sep 15;160(6):566-75
Date
Sep-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Animals
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - classification
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Chi-Square Distribution
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Disease Models, Animal
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Male
Medical History Taking
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Registries
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
Animal and human studies have suggested that antidepressant medications may be associated with several cancers. The authors evaluated the association between antidepressant medication use and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma using a Canadian population-based case-control study, the National Enhanced Cancer Surveillance Study. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases (n=638) diagnosed in 1995-1996 were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry, and controls (n=1,930) were identified from the Ontario Ministry of Finance Property Assessment Database. Antidepressant medication use was ascertained using a self-administered questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. "Ever" use of antidepressant medications was not associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk. The odds ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 25 or more months of tricyclic antidepressant medication use was 1.6; however, this was nonsignificant. Duration or history of use or individual types of antidepressant medications were not associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk. These findings do not support an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with antidepressant medication use.
PubMed ID
15353417 View in PubMed
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Antihistamine use and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184647
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Sep 10;106(4):566-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2003
Author
Victoria Nadalin
Michelle Cotterchio
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Division of Preventive Oncology, Research Unit, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. victoria.nadalin@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Sep 10;106(4):566-8
Date
Sep-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Histamine H1 Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Antihistamines are structurally similar to DPPE, a tamoxifen derivative known to promote tumor growth, and to antidepressants. Animal experiments have linked certain antihistamines and antidepressants with enhanced tumor growth in mice. The few epidemiologic studies examining antihistamine use have not indicated an increased risk. In light of suggestive animal data, structural similarities between antihistamines and DPPE, the widespread use of antihistamines, and the lack of epidemiologic investigation into their use and breast cancer risk, it is important to examine this issue. Female cases aged 25-74 years, diagnosed 1996 to 1998, were identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry. Controls were a random, age-matched sample of women. Cases (n=3,133) and controls (n=3,062) completed a mailed questionnaire that included questions about antihistamines used regularly (undefined), type and duration. Age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using logistic regression. Antihistamine users were at no increased risk for breast cancer (OR=0.93, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.06), and no trend in risk was observed for age starting or duration of use. Antihistamine users were at no increased risk. No confounding or effect modification was identified in multivariate modeling. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that women who use antihistamines are at a greater breast cancer risk than those who do not.
PubMed ID
12845653 View in PubMed
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Association between allergies, asthma, and breast cancer risk among women in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116012
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 May;24(5):1053-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Elizabeth C Lowcock
Michelle Cotterchio
Noor Ahmad
Author Affiliation
Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, 620 University Ave, Toronto, ON, M5G 2L7, Canada. beth.lowcock@cancercare.on.ca
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2013 May;24(5):1053-6
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Abstract
To investigate the association between allergies, asthma, and breast cancer risk in a large, population-based case-control study.
Breast cancer cases (n = 3,101) were identified using the Ontario Cancer Registry and population controls (n = 3,471) through random digit dialing. Self-reported histories of allergies, hay fever, and asthma were collected by questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to assess associations between breast cancer risk and history of allergy/hay fever and asthma, with 16 possible confounders examined. Analyses were stratified by menopausal status.
A history of allergies or hay fever was associated with a small reduction in breast cancer risk [age-adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.86, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.77-0.96] and did not differ by menopausal status. Asthma was not associated with breast cancer risk overall; however, among premenopausal women, asthma was associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (AOR = 0.72, 95 % CI 0.54-0.97).
A history of allergies may be associated with a modest reduction in breast cancer risk. Asthma does not appear to be associated with breast cancer risk overall; however, asthma may be associated with reduced breast cancer risk among premenopausal women.
PubMed ID
23443321 View in PubMed
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Association between biallelic and monoallelic germline MYH gene mutations and colorectal cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177604
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Nov 3;96(21):1631-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-2004
Author
Marina E Croitoru
Sean P Cleary
Nando Di Nicola
Michael Manno
Teresa Selander
Melyssa Aronson
Mark Redston
Michelle Cotterchio
Julia Knight
Robert Gryfe
Steven Gallinger
Author Affiliation
Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Nov 3;96(21):1631-4
Date
Nov-3-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenomatous Polyposis Coli - genetics
Aspartic Acid
Base Pair Mismatch
Case-Control Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Colorectal Neoplasms, Hereditary Nonpolyposis - genetics
Cysteine
DNA Glycosylases - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Germ-Line Mutation
Glycine
Humans
Loss of Heterozygosity
Ontario - epidemiology
Phenotype
Risk factors
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics
Tyrosine
Abstract
The MutY human homologue (MYH) gene encodes a member of the base excision repair pathway that is involved in repairing oxidative damage to DNA. Two germline MYH gene mutations that result in Myh proteins containing amino acid substitutions Y165C and G382D (hereafter called the Y165C and G382D mutations) are associated with adenomatous poly-posis and colorectal cancer among patients from several European poly-posis registries. We used a population-based series of 1238 colorectal cancer patients and 1255 healthy control subjects from Ontario, Canada, to examine the risk of colorectal cancer among biallelic and monoallelic germline MYH Y165C and G382D mutation carriers. The entire MYH gene coding region was screened in all MYH Y165C and G382D mutation carriers. Compared with noncarriers, biallelic and monoallelic germline MYH gene mutation carriers had an increased risk of colorectal cancer and were more likely to have first-or second-degree relatives with colorectal cancer (relative risk = 1.54, 95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 2.16). The increased risk of colorectal cancer in biallelic and monoallelic MYH gene mutation carriers was not consistently associated with the development of multiple adenomatous polyps. Loss of heterozygosity in at least one of four loci in MYH was detected in eight (47%) of 17 colorectal tumors from monoallelic MYH gene mutation carriers but in only two (20%) of 10 colorectal tumors from biallelic MYH gene mutation carriers. These two MYH gene mutations may account for a substantial fraction of hereditary colorectal cancer.
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Feb 16;97(4):320-1; author reply 321-215713969
PubMed ID
15523092 View in PubMed
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Association between colonic screening, subject characteristics, and stage of colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172016
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov;100(11):2531-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Laura Fazio
Michelle Cotterchio
Michael Manno
John McLaughlin
Steven Gallinger
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2005 Nov;100(11):2531-9
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body mass index
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Colonoscopy
Ethnic Groups
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Population Surveillance
Rectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - genetics - pathology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Rural Health
Abstract
Colorectal cancer remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in North America. Colorectal cancer survival is highly dependent on stage at diagnosis, therefore it is important to identify factors related to stage. This study evaluated the association between subject factors (e.g., colonic screening, family history) and stage of colorectal cancer at diagnosis.
Population-based colorectal cancer cases recruited by the Ontario Familial Colon Cancer Registry between 1997 and 1999 were staged according to the tumor-nodal-metastasis (TNM) staging system and classified as early (TNM I/II) or late (TNM III/IV) stage. Epidemiologic information and stage was available for 768 cases. Multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (OR) estimates.
Having had screening endoscopy reduced the risk of late stage diagnosis (OR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.22-0.98). Being older (>45 yr) was associated with a reduced risk of late stage cancer (OR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.18-0.74), as was having a first degree relative with colorectal cancer (OR =0.66, 95% CI 0.46-0.95). Rural residence (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.01-2.17) and non-white ethnicity (OR = 3.34, 95% CI 1.20-9.36) were associated with an increased risk of late stage cancer.
Several factors are independently associated with late stage colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer screening awareness and education programs need to consider targeting persons most likely to present with late stage colorectal cancer.
PubMed ID
16279911 View in PubMed
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Association between subject factors and colorectal cancer screening participation in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174775
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2005;29(3):221-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Farah Ramji
Michelle Cotterchio
Michael Manno
Linda Rabeneck
Steven Gallinger
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 2005;29(3):221-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Colonoscopy - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Middle Aged
Occult Blood
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient compliance
Pedigree
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sigmoidoscopy - utilization
Abstract
Colorectal cancer screening reduces colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. This population-based study was conducted to evaluate (i) the association between subject factors and colorectal screening participation and (ii) the lifetime prevalence of colorectal screening among the general population of Ontario, Canada. Population-based controls were recruited by the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry during 1998-2000. The 1944 persons completed an epidemiologic questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were computed and step-wise multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall, 23% of persons greater than 50 years of age reported ever having had colorectal cancer screening; 17% reported fecal occult blood test (FOBT), 6% sigmoidoscopy, and 4% colonoscopy. Family history of colorectal cancer, increased age, higher household income, and use of hormone replacement therapy (among women) were all significantly associated with ever having had colorectal cancer screening. The low prevalence of colorectal cancer screening among the target population suggests the need for an increased awareness of the public health importance of colorectal cancer screening.
PubMed ID
15896925 View in PubMed
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Association of total energy intake and macronutrient consumption with colorectal cancer risk: results from a large population-based case-control study in Newfoundland and Labrador and Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125827
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:18
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Zhuoyu Sun
Lin Liu
Peizhong Peter Wang
Barbara Roebothan
Jin Zhao
Elizabeth Dicks
Michelle Cotterchio
Sharon Buehler
Peter T Campbell
John R McLaughlin
Patrick S Parfrey
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St, John's, NL, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:18
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cholesterol - administration & dosage
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Fatty Acids, Unsaturated - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Diet is regarded as one of the most important environmental factors associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. A recent report comprehensively concluded that total energy intake does not have a simple relationship with CRC risk, and that the data were inconsistent for carbohydrate, cholesterol and protein. The objective of this study was to identify the associations of CRC risk with dietary intakes of total energy, protein, fat, carbohydrate, fiber, and alcohol using data from a large case-control study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Ontario (ON), Canada.
Incident colorectal cancer cases (n = 1760) were identified from population-based cancer registries in the provinces of ON (1997-2000) and NL (1999-2003). Controls (n = 2481) were a random sample of residents in each province, aged 20-74 years. Family history questionnaire (FHQ), personal history questionnaire (PHQ), and food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) were used to collect study data. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of intakes of total energy, macronutrients and alcohol with CRC risk.
Total energy intake was associated with higher risk of CRC (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.21-2.01, p-trend = 0.02, 5th versus 1st quintile), whereas inverse associations emerged for intakes of protein (OR: 0.85, 95%CI: 0.69-1.00, p-trend = 0.06, 5th versus 1st quintile), carbohydrate (OR: 0.81, 95%CI: 0.63-1.00, p-trend = 0.05, 5th versus 1st quintile) and total dietary fiber (OR: 0.84, 95% CI:0.67-0.99, p-trend = 0.04, 5th versus 1st quintile). Total fat, alcohol, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and cholesterol were not associated with CRC risk.
This study provides further evidence that high energy intake may increase risk of incident CRC, whereas diets high in protein, fiber, and carbohydrate may reduce the risk of the disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22449145 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.