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An outbreak of listeriosis suspected to have been caused by rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59040
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
H. Ericsson
A. Eklöw
M L Danielsson-Tham
S. Loncarevic
L O Mentzing
I. Persson
H. Unnerstad
W. Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala. Henrik.Ericsson@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-7
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Bacteremia
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Preservation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Listeria Infections - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Meat - microbiology
Obstetric labor, premature
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Pregnancy
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
An outbreak of listeriosis in Sweden, consisting of nine cases, was investigated by means of molecular typing of strains from patients and strains isolated from suspected foodstuffs, together with interviews of the patients. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from six of the patients, and all isolates were of the same clonal type. This clonal type was also isolated from a "gravad" rainbow trout, made by producer Y, found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. Unopened packages obtained from producer Y were also found to contain the same clonal type of L. monocytogenes. Based on the interview results and the bacteriological typing, we suspect that at least six of the nine cases were caused by gravad or cold-smoked rainbow trout made by producer Y. To our knowledge, this is the first rainbow trout-borne outbreak of listeriosis ever reported.
PubMed ID
9350756 View in PubMed
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Lessons from an outbreak of listeriosis related to vacuum-packed gravad and cold-smoked fish.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196107
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):173-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2000
Author
W. Tham
H. Ericsson
S. Loncarevic
H. Unnerstad
M L Danielsson-Tham
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, SLU, Uppsala, Sweden. wilhelm.tham@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Dec 20;62(3):173-5
Date
Dec-20-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Food Handling
Food Preservation
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Refrigeration
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Vacuum
Abstract
The first lesson learned from this outbreak was that vacuum-packed rainbow trout is not only an excellent medium for the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, but may also cause human listeriosis. Another lesson is that one single fish processing plant may spread multiple clonal types of L. monocytogenes by selling contaminated products to consumers. Thus, when investigating fish-borne outbreaks of listeriosis one should identify and type several isolates of L. monocytogenes from each food and environmental sample, since multiple clonal types might be present. The outbreak described in this paper involved at least eight human cases, three clonal types of L. monocytogenes, and lasted for 11 months. During the outbreak investigation, L. monocytogenes was also isolated from another brand of rainbow trout found in the refrigerator of one of the patients. These latter isolates belonged to a clonal type not associated with the outbreak. However, this clonal type is of considerable interest since it has been associated with foodborne outbreaks of listeriosis in several countries, and is also the second most common clonal type among human clinical isolates of L. monocytogenes in Sweden. Besides the described outbreak, it is likely that vacuum-packed, cold-smoked and gravad rainbow trout have been involved in additional cases of foodborne listeriosis in Sweden.
PubMed ID
11156259 View in PubMed
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Molecular epidemiology of an outbreak of febrile gastroenteritis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in cold-smoked rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201835
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jul;37(7):2358-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
M K Miettinen
A. Siitonen
P. Heiskanen
H. Haajanen
K J Björkroth
H J Korkeala
Author Affiliation
Department of Food and Environmental Hygiene, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. msjoman@vetmed.helsinki.fi
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1999 Jul;37(7):2358-60
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Female
Fever
Finland - epidemiology
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Listeriosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology - methods
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Serotyping
Abstract
Febrile gastroenteritis in five healthy persons was associated with the consumption of vacuum-packed cold-smoked rainbow trout containing Listeria monocytogenes. L. monocytogenes isolates from the incriminated fish product lot and the stool samples were all of serotype 1/2a and were indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis employing AscI and SmaI.
Notes
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Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1997 Aug;16(8):827-89271054
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1997 Nov;35(11):2904-79350756
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 1996 Aug;31(1-3):59-688880297
PubMed ID
10364616 View in PubMed
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PCR detection of Listeria monocytogenes in 'gravad' rainbow trout.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75590
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1997 Apr 15;35(3):281-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1997
Author
H. Ericsson
P. Stålhandske
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. Henrik.Ericsson@lmhyg.slu.se
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 1997 Apr 15;35(3):281-5
Date
Apr-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Base Sequence
Colony Count, Microbial
DNA, Bacterial - analysis - chemistry - genetics
Food Handling - standards
Food Microbiology
Food Poisoning - etiology
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - genetics - isolation & purification
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sensitivity and specificity
Spermidine - analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
'Gravad' rainbow trout artificially contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes was analyzed by use of a 4 h enrichment period followed by extraction of DNA and PCR amplification. This procedure made it possible to detect 10-100 cfu L. monocytogenes per gram 'gravad' rainbow trout, within 12 h. After a prolonged enrichment period of 24 h, numbers as low as 1-10 cfu L. monocytogenes per gram could be detected. The method described may be a useful tool for screening samples of 'gravad' rainbow trout for the presence of L. monocytogenes, since it is sensitive, rapid and simple.
PubMed ID
9105939 View in PubMed
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Quantitative risk assessment for Listeria monocytogenes in smoked or gravad salmon and rainbow trout in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197562
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Jul 15;58(3):181-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2000
Author
R. Lindqvist
A. Westöö
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. roli@slv.se
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2000 Jul 15;58(3):181-96
Date
Jul-15-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Computer simulation
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Food Microbiology
Hazardous Substances - standards
Humans
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development - immunology - pathogenicity
Listeriosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Models, Biological
Monte Carlo Method
Oncorhynchus mykiss - microbiology
Prevalence
Risk Assessment - methods - standards
Salmon - microbiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of the present work was to develop a quantitative risk assessment model in which the exposure and risk of acquiring listeriosis from consumption of packaged smoked or gravad salmon and rainbow trout were estimated. An Excel spreadsheet model was constructed in which variables were represented by distributions based on surveys of L. monocytogenes in these food products, and on demographic and consumption data. Growth or inactivation was not included in the model. The model was run through Monte Carlo simulations using the @Risk software (Palisade Corporation). The probability of illness per serving was calculated using two dose-response models from the literature. The first was an exponential model in which the species specific constant R, that helps define the dose-response curve, previously has been estimated to be 1.18 x 10(-10) based on German data (GR). In this study, R was estimated to 5.6 x 10(-10) based on Swedish data. The second model was a flexible Weibull-Gamma model (WG), with different coefficients for high- and low-risk groups. The exponential model (GR), although conservative and generally overestimating the risk, still predicted a lower probability of illness than the WG-model. The estimated mean risk per serving was 2.8 x 10(-5) (GR, high-risk group), 2.0 x 10(-3) (WG, low-risk group) and 0.016 (WG, high-risk group), respectively. The average number of reported listeriosis cases in Sweden is 37 per year. In comparison, the mean number of annual cases predicted by the risk assessment model was 168 (range 47 to 2800, GR, high-risk group), and 95 000 (range 34 000 to 1.6 x 10(6), WG high-risk group), respectively. If 1 to 10% (uniform distribution) of strains, instead of all, were considered virulent, the mean number of predicted cases would decrease to nine (GR) and 5200 (WG), respectively. The mean annual cumulative individual risk in the high-risk group based on a monthly exposure was estimated to be 4.0 x 10(-4) (range 8.0 x 10(-8) to 5.4 x 10(-3), GR). This risk increased to 1.5 x 10(-3) (range 1.7 x 10(-5) to 9.2 x 10(-3), GR) based on a weekly exposure. The risk assessment model was most sensitive to the input distribution describing the level of contamination and to a lesser degree on the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, the proportion of virulent strains, and serving sizes. A lack of data on the prevalence and concentration of L. monocytogenes in these products, dose-response data and quantitative information on the proportion of virulent strains were identified.
PubMed ID
10939268 View in PubMed
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