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19 records – page 1 of 2.

[A patient inquiry on the quality assurance work at an oncologic clinic. Patients' communication needs are not sufficiently cared for at present].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224314
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Feb 19;89(8):578-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-1992

Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology position paper on cancer-related fatigue.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203806
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1998 Sep;8(S1):S4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
D. Mings
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1998 Sep;8(S1):S4
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Fatigue - etiology - nursing
Humans
Neoplasms - complications
Oncology Nursing - standards
PubMed ID
9832714 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer patient and staff perceptions of caring and clinical care in free versus forced choice response formats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21203
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1998;12(4):238-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
V. Widmark-Petersson
L. von Essen
P O Sjödén
Author Affiliation
Centre for Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. viveca.widmark-petersson@ccs.uu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1998;12(4):238-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence - standards
Comparative Study
Empathy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Oncologic Nursing - standards
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Two questions were investigated: whether cancer patients (n = 32) and staff (n = 30) have different cognitive representations of the concepts 'caring' (Swedish: 'omvårdnad') and 'clinical care' (Swedish: 'vård'), and whether results differ between forced vs. free choice response formats. Two Swedish versions of the CARE-Q instrument were used: (i) a CARE-Q sorting (forced format) and (ii) a CARE-Questionnaire (free format). Four groups of patients and 4 groups of staff completed (i) the forced format/caring, (ii) the forced format/clinical care, (iii) the free format/caring and (iv) the free format/clinical care versions, respectively. Participants were asked to rank the importance of 50 CARE-Q behaviours for the specific method/concept combination. Results demonstrated that neither patients nor staff, to any great extent, valued CARE-Q subscales differently when regarded as examples of 'caring' vs. 'clinical care'. Further, the free vs. forced choice format did not influence patient and staff perceptions of the importance of CARE-Q subscales, except that both groups gave higher values to all subscales in the free choice response format. The assumptions that different cognitive representations of the concepts or the response formats had affected previous CARE-Q results were not substantiated.
PubMed ID
10067650 View in PubMed
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[Cancer treatment in Skane and in Sjaelland. Do differences concerning examination and treatment explain reduced survival among Danish cancer patients?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19989
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):439-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2001
Author
L K Specht
T. Landberg
Author Affiliation
Onkologisk klinik, Finsencentret, H:S Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 København ø.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):439-42
Date
Jan-22-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bladder Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Clinical Competence
Colonic Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Oncologic Nursing - standards - statistics & numerical data
Oncology Service, Hospital - standards - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Danish cancer patients generally have a poorer survival than Swedish cancer patients. The difference is most pronounced for certain tumour types, e.g. common types such as lung, breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer. The reasons are not clear. The present article examines if differences in the diagnostic workup and treatment can explain some of this variation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Aspects of the diagnostic workup and treatment of the above mentioned four cancer types are examined using data from cancer registry analyses and official reports. These data are seen in the context of counts of trained personnel and equipment in cancer diagnostics and treatment in the two countries. RESULTS: With regard to lung and breast cancer, the data seem to indicate that Danish patients are diagnosed later, and that Denmark lags behind in treatment capacity. With regard to rectal cancer, the data seem to indicate that concentrating operations in fewer hospitals, and improvements in operation technique have been introduced earlier in Sweden than in Denmark. With regard to prostate cancer, however, the data seem to indicate that many more indolent cases that do not need treatment are diagnosed in Sweden than in Denmark. The total capacity for oncologic treatment, both in terms of trained personnel and equipment, seen in relation to the size of the population, is considerably larger in Southern Sweden than in Eastern Denmark. DISCUSSION: The data for some of the common cancer types seem to indicate that problems in the areas of sufficient capacity for diagnostic workup and treatment may explain some of the difference in survival between Danish and Swedish cancer patients.
PubMed ID
11218779 View in PubMed
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A care pathway for patients with oesophageal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86399
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2007 Nov;16(6):533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Viklund P.
Lagergren J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Department of Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. pernilla.viklund@karolinska.se
Source
Eur J Cancer Care (Engl). 2007 Nov;16(6):533-8
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Esophageal Neoplasms - nursing - therapy
Evidence-Based Medicine
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Nurse's Role
Oncologic Nursing - standards
Palliative Care - methods
Patient-Centered Care - standards
Sweden
Abstract
A well-functioning care pathway for oesophageal cancer patients is particularly important in view of the need for a multidisciplinary approach and of the complex diagnostic procedures, extensive treatment, increasing volume of patients at fewer centres, and poor prognosis. Nevertheless, the literature regarding organization of care pathways for cancer patients is sparse. We therefore present our newly developed care pathway for oesophageal cancer patients, created to optimize the organization, coordination and supportive care. Based on scientific evidence, the pathway includes all relevant diagnostic examinations and therapeutic options, multidisciplinary team meetings, programmes for follow-up, rehabilitation and after-hospital care, and organized supportive care throughout the pathway, all led by a specialist nurse. The specialist nurse maintains continuous contacts with the patient and family throughout the care pathway. The experience and evaluation of our care pathway indicate that it works well in clinical practice, and that the role of the specialist nurse seems to be the key to the success, from the colleagues', hospital's and patients' point of view. This pathway has therefore been established at our hospital, and we can recommend well-organized and nurse-led care pathways for oesophageal cancer patients.
PubMed ID
17944769 View in PubMed
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CNA and ASI pilot state-of-the-art testing technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163130
Source
Can Nurse. 2007 May;103(5):13
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007

Comorbid Dementia and Cancer in Residents of Nursing Homes: Secondary Analyses of a Cross-Sectional Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299399
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2018 Mar/Apr; 41(2):E13-E20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Kjersti Marie Blytt
Geir Selbæk
Jorunn Drageset
Gerd Karin Natvig
Bettina S Husebo
Author Affiliation
Author Affiliations: Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care (Ms Blytt and Drs Drageset, Natvig, and Husebo) and Centre for Elderly and Nursing Home Medicine (Ms Blytt and Dr Husebo), University of Bergen; Norwegian Competence Center for Sleep Disorders, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Ms Blytt); Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo; Ageing and Health, Norwegian Centre for Research, Education and Service Development, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tonsberg; and Centre for Old Age Psychiatry Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Ottestad (Dr Selbæk); Faculty for Health and Social Sciences, Bergen University College (Dr Drageset); and the Municipality of Bergen (Dr Husebo), Norway.
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2018 Mar/Apr; 41(2):E13-E20
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - complications - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - complications
Norway
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Oncology Nursing - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prevalence
Psychomotor Agitation - drug therapy
Sleep Wake Disorders - drug therapy - etiology
Abstract
Life expectancy is increasing continuously, which increases the likelihood of developing dementia or cancer. Both dementia and cancer are serious conditions that give manifold symptoms. The interaction of these conditions is however complex and less explored.
The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of cancer and differences regarding neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) and medication among nursing home (NH) patients with and without dementia and cancer.
This is a cross-sectional study of Norwegian NH patients (N = 1825). Participants were categorized according to degree of dementia (Clinical Dementia Rating > 1) and cancer diagnoses. Differences in NPS and other symptoms, as well as the use of medication, were explored.
Eighty-four percent of NH patients had dementia, and 5.5% had comorbid dementia and cancer. Patients with comorbid dementia and cancer received significantly more analgesics compared with patients without cancer but with dementia (P
PubMed ID
28146014 View in PubMed
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Complexity in caring for patients with advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17942
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Feb;45(4):420-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Carol Tishelman
Britt-Marie Bernhardson
Karin Blomberg
Sussanne Börjeson
Liselotte Franklin
Eva Johansson
Helena Leveälahti
Eva Sahlberg-Blom
Britt-Marie Ternestedt
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. carol.tishelman@omv.ki.se
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2004 Feb;45(4):420-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Focus Groups
Humans
Neoplasms - nursing
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Process - standards
Oncologic Nursing - standards
Palliative Care - standards
Quality of Health Care - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The gap between nursing research and practice is readily acknowledged in literature, with a variety of strategies suggested for reducing this gap. It is necessary not only to address problems of research implementation in practice, but also to find strategies that strengthen the influence of practitioners on research agendas through more collaborative relationships in order to have an impact on care of patients. A multi-centre research project was therefore initiated by two universities and three health care facilities, aiming to improve quality of care for patients with advanced cancer through a knowledge-exchange programme between nurse researchers, practitioners and students. AIM: The aim of this article is to explore how clinical staff reason about care provision for patients with advanced cancer, through analysis of 20 focus group discussions conducted with staff in three different health care facilities in two Swedish cities. An initial analysis based on grounded theory was complemented with consideration of the interactive process in the focus group discussions, and carried out by a team consisting of senior nurse researchers, clinical experts and nursing instructors. FINDINGS: The findings of the focus group discussions emphasize the complexity of caregiving for patients with advanced cancer. The tension between caregiving ideals and limits imposed by the realities of caregiving in today's health system were striking. Practitioners discussed the organization of care, different constellations of relationships between patients, family members and professionals, and theoretical and experiential knowledge as equally important aspects in dealing with all concrete situations in daily practice. The importance of reflective practice, use of self and ethical reasoning also permeated the focus group discussions. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight an integrated need both to influence organizational structures and working relationships, along with increasing knowledge, if sustainable change is to be effected.
PubMed ID
14756836 View in PubMed
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[Do computers give us more time for care?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22269
Source
Vard Nord Utveckl Forsk. 1997;17(4):30-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
M. Browall
Author Affiliation
Onkologiska enheten Avd 55, Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg, Sverige.
Source
Vard Nord Utveckl Forsk. 1997;17(4):30-1
Date
1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cancer Care Facilities
Computers
Humans
Nursing Records - standards
Oncologic Nursing - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Sweden
PubMed ID
9464157 View in PubMed
Less detail

The human genome project--what will we do with it?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191038
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 2000;10(3):91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000

19 records – page 1 of 2.