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518 records – page 1 of 52.

Achieving conservation when opportunity costs are high: optimizing reserve design in Alberta's oil sands region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131962
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e23254
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Richard R Schneider
Grant Hauer
Dan Farr
W L Adamowicz
Stan Boutin
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. ministik99@telus.net
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e23254
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics - methods
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Ecosystem
Geography
Humans
Oil and Gas Fields
Petroleum - economics
Resource Allocation - economics - methods
Abstract
Recent studies have shown that conservation gains can be achieved when the spatial distributions of biological benefits and economic costs are incorporated in the conservation planning process. Using Alberta, Canada, as a case study we apply these techniques in the context of coarse-filter reserve design. Because targets for ecosystem representation and other coarse-filter design elements are difficult to define objectively we use a trade-off analysis to systematically explore the relationship between conservation targets and economic opportunity costs. We use the Marxan conservation planning software to generate reserve designs at each level of conservation target to ensure that our quantification of conservation and economic outcomes represents the optimal allocation of resources in each case. Opportunity cost is most affected by the ecological representation target and this relationship is nonlinear. Although petroleum resources are present throughout most of Alberta, and include highly valuable oil sands deposits, our analysis indicates that over 30% of public lands could be protected while maintaining access to more than 97% of the value of the region's resources. Our case study demonstrates that optimal resource allocation can be usefully employed to support strategic decision making in the context of land-use planning, even when conservation targets are not well defined.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21858046 View in PubMed
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Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289559
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
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Acoustic vector sensor beamforming reduces masking from underwater industrial noise during passive monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289717
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2016
Author
Aaron M Thode
Katherine H Kim
Robert G Norman
Susanna B Blackwell
Charles R Greene
Author Affiliation
Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, California 92093-0205, USA athode@ucsd.edu.
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2016 04; 139(4):EL105
Date
04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acoustics - instrumentation
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - instrumentation - methods
Equipment Design
Models, Theoretical
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Oceans and Seas
Oil and Gas Industry
Pressure
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Sound Spectrography
Time Factors
Transducers, Pressure
Vocalization, Animal
Water
Abstract
Masking from industrial noise can hamper the ability to detect marine mammal sounds near industrial operations, whenever conventional (pressure sensor) hydrophones are used for passive acoustic monitoring. Using data collected from an autonomous recorder with directional capabilities (Directional Autonomous Seafloor Acoustic Recorder), deployed 4.1?km from an arctic drilling site in 2012, the authors demonstrate how conventional beamforming on an acoustic vector sensor can be used to suppress noise arriving from a narrow sector of geographic azimuths. Improvements in signal-to-noise ratio of up to 15?dB are demonstrated on bowhead whale calls, which were otherwise undetectable using conventional hydrophones.
PubMed ID
27106345 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advances in NORM management in Norway and the application of ICRP's 2007 recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119562
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Liland
P. Strand
I. Amundsen
H. Natvig
M. Nilsen
R. Lystad
K E Frogg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, P.O. Box 55, No-1332 Osteras, Norway. astrid.liland@nrpa.no
Source
Ann ICRP. 2012 Oct-Dec;41(3-4):332-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemical Industry
Environmental Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Extraction and Processing Industry
Government Regulation
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
International Agencies
Norway
Oil and Gas Fields
Radiation Protection - standards
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Waste Management - standards
Abstract
In Norway, the largest reported quantities of radioactive discharges and radioactive waste containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) come from the oil and gas sector, and smaller quantities of other NORM waste are also produced by industrial or mining processes. The Gulen final repository for radioactive waste from the oil and gas industry from the Norwegian continental shelf was opened in 2008 and has a capacity of 6000 tonnes. As of 1 January 2011, a new regulation was enforced whereby radioactive waste and radioactive pollution was integrated in the Pollution Control Act from 1981. This means that radioactive waste and radioactive pollution are now regulated under the same legal framework as all other pollutants and hazardous wastes. The regulation establishes two sets of criteria defining radioactive waste: a lower value for when waste is considered to be radioactive waste, and a higher value, in most cases, for when this waste must be disposed of in a final waste repository. For example, waste containing = 1 Bq/g of Ra-226 is defined as radioactive waste, while radioactive waste containing = 10 Bq/g of Ra-226 must be disposed of in a final repository. Radioactive waste between 1 and 10B q/g can be handled and disposed of by waste companies who have a licence for handling hazardous waste according to the Pollution Control Act. Alternatively, they will need a separate licence for handling radioactive waste from the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. The goal of the new regulation is that all radioactive waste should be handled and stored in a safe manner, and discharges should be controlled through a licensing regime in order to avoid/not pose unnecessary risk to humans or the environment. This paper will elaborate on the new regulation of radioactive waste and the principles of NORM management in Norway in view of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's 2007 Recommendations.
PubMed ID
23089033 View in PubMed
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Advancing Oil Spill Response in Ice-Covered Waters.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301424
Source
Prince William Sound Oil Spill Recovery Institute and United States Arctic Research Commission. 19 pages.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2004
ADVANCING OIL SPILL RESPONSE I N I C E - C O V E R E D W A T E R S prepared for Prince William Sound Oil Spill Recovery Institute Cordova, Alaska and United States Arctic Research Commission Arlington, Virginia and Anchorage, Alaska prepared by DF Dickins Associates Ltd. • info
  1 document  
Author
DF Dickins Associates Ltd
Source
Prince William Sound Oil Spill Recovery Institute and United States Arctic Research Commission. 19 pages.
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1125061
Keywords
Sea ice
Oil spills
Response strategies
Abstract
The objective of this project is to identify programs and research and development projects that improve the ability of responders to deal with accidental oil spills in fresh or salt-water marine environments where there is ice. This includes spills that occur on top of or underneath solid, stable ice extending out from shore (land-fast), into an area of drifting ice floes (pack ice), or onto an ice-covered shoreline.
Documents
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Aerobic microbial taxa dominate deep subsurface cores from the Alberta oil sands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299361
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 06 01; 94(6):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
Christina M Ridley
Gerrit Voordouw
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4, Canada.
Source
FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2018 06 01; 94(6):
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alberta
Bacteria, Aerobic - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Biodegradation, Environmental
Fungi - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Hydrocarbons - metabolism
Microbiota - genetics
Oil and Gas Fields - microbiology
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S - genetics
Soil Microbiology
Abstract
Little is known about the microbial ecology of the subsurface oil sands in Northern Alberta, Canada. Biodegradation of low molecular weight hydrocarbons by indigenous microbes has enriched high molecular weight hydrocarbons, resulting in highly viscous bitumen. This extreme subsurface environment is further characterized by low nutrient availability and limited access to water, thus resulting in low microbial biomass. Improved DNA isolation protocols and increasingly sensitive sequencing methods have allowed an in-depth investigation of the microbial ecology of this unique subsurface environmental niche. Community analysis was performed on core samples (n = 62) that were retrieved from two adjacent sites located in the Athabasca Oil Sands at depths from 220 to 320 m below the surface. Microbial communities were dominated by aerobic taxa, including Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. Only one core sample microbial community was dominated by anaerobic taxa, including the methanogen Methanoculleus, as well as Desulfomicrobium and Thauera. Although the temperature of the bitumen-containing subsurface is low (8°C), two core samples had high fractions of the potentially thermophilic taxon, Thermus. Predominance of aerobic taxa in the subsurface suggests the potential for in situ aerobic hydrocarbon degradation; however, more studies are required to determine the functional role of these taxa within this unique environment.
PubMed ID
29688331 View in PubMed
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[AKAN (Labor Committee for Alcoholism and Drug Abuse) in the North Sea]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12568
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Aug 28;74(14):29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1987

Alaskan oil spill: health risks uncovered.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4160
Source
Science. 1989 Aug 4;245(4917):463
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-4-1989

518 records – page 1 of 52.