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The addition of a cocktail of yeast species to Cantalet cheese changes bacterial survival and enhances aroma compound formation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154035
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Jan 31;129(1):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2009
Author
Isabelle De Freitas
Nicolas Pinon
Jean-Louis Maubois
Sylvie Lortal
Anne Thierry
Author Affiliation
Les Fromageries Occitanes, Villefranche de Lauragais, France.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Jan 31;129(1):37-42
Date
Jan-31-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Food Microbiology
France
Humans
Kluyveromyces - growth & development - physiology
Lipolysis
Odors - analysis
Pichia - growth & development - physiology
Volatilization
Yarrowia - growth & development - physiology
Abstract
Indigenous yeasts can be detected at high populations in raw milk Cantal cheese, a French Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO) hard cheese. To investigate their use as adjunct cultures to promote flavour development in Cantalet (small Cantal) cheese, three strains isolated from raw milk Cantal cheese, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Pichia fermentans were added at 3 (E3) and 5 (E5) log(10) colony-forming units (cfu)/mL to microfiltered milk at a ratio of 80/10/10 viable cells, respectively. The global microbial, compositional and biochemical changes induced by the presence of yeasts in cheese were determined. Adjunct yeasts did not grow but stayed at viable populations of approximately 4 and 6 log(10) cfu/g in E3 and E5 cheeses, respectively, throughout the ripening period. They were mainly constituted of K. lactis, while P. fermentans and Y. lipolytica were not detectable after 3 and 45 days of ripening, respectively. Several species of indigenous yeasts were also detected in E3 cheeses at the beginning of ripening only, and in the control cheeses without yeasts added. Lactoccoci survived for longer periods in the presence of yeast adjuncts, while, conversely, the viability of Streptococcus thermophilus decreased more rapidly. The addition of yeasts did not influence cheese composition and total free amino acid content. In contrast, it slightly increased lipolysis in both E3 and E5 cheeses and markedly enhanced the formation of some volatile aroma compounds. The concentrations of ethanol, ethyl esters and some branched-chain alcohols were 6 to 10 fold higher in E5 cheeses than in the control cheeses, and only slightly higher in E3 cheeses. This study shows that K. lactis has a potential as cheese adjunct culture in Cantalet cheese and that, added at populations of 4-5 log(10) cfu/g cheese, it enhances the formation of flavour compounds.
PubMed ID
19036465 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from biodegradable wastes and non-specific health symptoms among residents: direct or annoyance-mediated associations?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268820
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Feb;120:371-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Victoria Blanes-Vidal
Source
Chemosphere. 2015 Feb;120:371-7
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Odors - analysis
Self Report
Abstract
Adverse health effects of exposure to high levels of air pollutants from biodegradable wastes have been well-studied. However, few investigations have examined the potential effects of chronic exposure to low-to-moderate levels on non-specific health symptoms among residents. Besides, most studies have relied on distances to waste sites to assign exposure status, and have not investigated whether the exposure-symptoms associations are direct or mediated by odor annoyance. In this study, individual-level exposures to a proxy indicator of biodegradable waste pollution (ammonia, NH3) in non-urban residences (n=454) during 2005-2010 were characterized by data from emission-dispersion validated models. Logistic regression and mediating analyses were used to examine associations between exposures and questionnaire-based data on annoyance and non-specific symptoms, after adjusting by person-specific covariates. Strong dose-response associations were found between exposures and annoyance, and between annoyance and symptoms. Associations between exposures and symptoms (nausea, headache, dizziness, difficulty concentrating and unnatural fatigue) were indirect (annoyance-mediated). This study indicates that environmental exposures play an important role in the genesis of non-specific symptoms among residents exposed to low-to-moderate air pollution from biodegradable wastes, although the effects seem to be indirect, relayed through stress-related mechanisms.
PubMed ID
25192839 View in PubMed
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An Extraordinary Host-Specific Sex Ratio in an Avian Louse (Phthiraptera: Insecta)--Chemical Distortion?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273196
Source
Environ Entomol. 2015 Aug;44(4):1149-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
H D Douglas
J R Malenke
Source
Environ Entomol. 2015 Aug;44(4):1149-54
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Aldehydes - metabolism
Animals
Charadriiformes - metabolism
Host Specificity
Ischnocera - physiology
Lice Infestations - epidemiology - parasitology - veterinary
Odors - analysis
Sex ratio
Abstract
Distortions of sex ratios and sexual traits from synthetic chemicals have been well documented; however, there is little evidence for such phenomena associated with naturally occurring chemical exposures. We reasoned that chemical secretions of vertebrates could contribute to skewed sex ratios in ectoparasitic insects due to differences in susceptibility among the sexes. For example, among ectoparasitic lice the female is generally the larger sex. Smaller males may be more susceptible to chemical effects. We studied sex ratios of lice on two sympatric species of colonial seabirds. Crested auklets (Aethia cristatella) secrete a strong smelling citrus-like odorant composed of aldehydes while a closely related congener the least auklet (Aethia pusilla) lacks these compounds. Each auklet hosts three species of lice, two of which are shared in common. We found that the sex ratio of one louse species, Quadraceps aethereus (Giebel), was highly skewed on crested auklets 1:69 (males: females), yet close to unity on least auklets (1:0.97). We suggest that a host-specific effect contributes to this difference, such as the crested auklet's chemical odorant.
PubMed ID
26314060 View in PubMed
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Annual variations of odor concentrations and emissions from swine gestation, farrowing, and nursery buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127801
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2011 Dec;61(12):1361-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Huiqing Guo
Yuanyuan Wang
Yuming Yuan
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. huiqing.guo@usask.ca
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2011 Dec;61(12):1361-8
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Environmental monitoring
Housing, Animal
Humans
Odors - analysis
Saskatchewan
Seasons
Swine
Abstract
To obtain annual odor emission profiles from intensive swine operations, odor concentrations and emission rates were measured monthly from swine nursery, farrowing, and gestation rooms for a year. Large annual variations in odor concentrations and emissions were found in all the rooms and the impact of the seasonal factor (month) was significant (P
PubMed ID
22263424 View in PubMed
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Application of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277039
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Nov 06;82(2):578-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-06-2015
Author
Martin Täubel
Anne M Karvonen
Tiina Reponen
Anne Hyvärinen
Stephen Vesper
Juha Pekkanen
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Nov 06;82(2):578-84
Date
Nov-06-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Fungi - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Housing - standards
Odors - analysis
Abstract
The environmental relative moldiness index (ERMI) metric was previously developed to quantify mold contamination in U.S. homes. This study determined the applicability of the ERMI for quantifying mold and moisture damage in Finnish residences. Homes of the LUKAS2 birth cohort in Finland were visually inspected for moisture damage and mold, and vacuumed floor dust samples were collected. An ERMI analysis including 36 mold-specific quantitative PCR assays was performed on the dust samples (n = 144), and the ERMI metric was analyzed against inspection-based observations of moisture damage and mold. Our results show that the ERMI was significantly associated with certain observations of visible mold in Finnish homes but not with moisture damage. Several mold species occurred more frequently and at higher levels in Finnish than in U.S. homes. Modification of the ERMI toward Finnish conditions, using a subsample of LUKAS2 homes with and without moisture damage, resulted in a simplified metric based on 10 mold species. The Finnish ERMI (FERMI) performed substantially better in quantifying moisture and mold damage in Finnish homes, showing significant associations with various observations of visible mold, strongest when the damage was located in the child's main living area, as well as with mold odor and moisture damage. As shown in Finland, the ERMI as such is not equally well usable in different climates and geographic regions but may be remodeled to account for local outdoor and indoor fungal conditions as well as for moisture damage characteristics in a given country.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26546428 View in PubMed
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Associations between self-reported odour annoyance and volatile organic compounds in 'Chemical Valley', Sarnia, Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120338
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2013 Jun;185(6):4537-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Dominic Odwa Atari
Isaac N Luginaah
Kevin Gorey
Xiaohong Xu
Karen Fung
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Nipissing University, 100 College Drive, North Bay, Ontario, Canada P1B 8L7. odwaa@nipissingu.ca
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2013 Jun;185(6):4537-49
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Chemical
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Odors - analysis
Ontario
Questionnaires
Self Report
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Xylenes - analysis
Abstract
Annoyance produced by air pollution has been suggested as a useful proxy for determining ambient air pollution exposure. However, most of the studies, to date, have focused on nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide, with no work done on volatile organic compounds (VOC). This study is aimed at examining the associations between odour annoyance and VOC in 'Chemical Valley', Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. Annoyance scores were extracted from a community health survey (N = 774), and exposures to VOC were estimated from respondents' six-digit alphanumeric postal codes using land use regression models. Univariate analyses were used to explore the relationships between odour annoyance and modelled pollutants, whilst multivariate ordinal logistic regression was utilized to examine the determinants of odour annoyance. The results indicate that odour annoyance is significantly associated with modelled benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene and (m + p) xylene (BTEX) pollutants. The findings also show that the determinants of odour annoyance in the context of VOC include gender, number of relatives in the community, perception of air pollution, community satisfaction, medical checkups, ability to cope with daily life demands and general symptoms. When compared, the analysis indicates that Sarnia residents respond to considerably lower BTEX concentrations than the allowable 'safe' levels in the province of Ontario. In general, the results exhibit a dose-response gradient with annoyance score increasing with rising modelled pollutant concentrations. The observed relationships suggest that odour annoyance might be a function of true exposure and may serve as a proxy for air quality and ambient air pollution monitoring. However, questionnaire-based odour annoyance scores need to be longitudinally validated across different geographical scales and pollutants if they are to be adopted at the national level.
PubMed ID
23014924 View in PubMed
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Chemical and sensory quantification of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from recirculated aquacultures in relation to concentrations in basin water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130038
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Dec 14;59(23):12561-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-14-2011
Author
Mikael A Petersen
Grethe Hyldig
Bjarne W Strobel
Niels H Henriksen
Niels O G Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark. map@life.ku.dk
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2011 Dec 14;59(23):12561-8
Date
Dec-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Aquaculture - methods
Bornanes - analysis
Denmark
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Meat - analysis
Naphthols - analysis
Odors - analysis
Oncorhynchus mykiss
Sensation
Taste
Water - chemistry
Abstract
Globally, aquaculture systems with water recirculation experience increasing problems with microbial taste and odor compounds (TOCs) such as geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB). This study investigated the content of geosmin and MIB in water and the flesh of 200 rainbow trouts from eight recirculated aquaculture systems in Denmark. TOC content in the fish flesh was measured by a dynamic headspace extraction method and was evaluated by a sensory panel. The results showed significant correlations between TOC content in water and fish and between chemical analysis and sensory perception. When geosmin exceeded 20 ng/L in the water, 96% of the fish had an intense muddy flavor, but below 10 ng geosmin/L, 18% of the fish (only 3% in special depuration ponds) had an intense muddy flavor. The results indicate that TOC levels
PubMed ID
22040367 View in PubMed
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Community odours in the vicinity of a petrochemical industrial complex.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234396
Source
JAPCA. 1987 Dec;37(12):1418-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987

Community reappraisal of the perceived health effects of a petroleum refinery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189269
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jul;55(1):47-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Isaac N Luginaah
S Martin Taylor
Susan J Elliott
John D Eyles
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology & Anthropology, University of Windsor, Ont, Canada. luginaah@uwindsor.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jul;55(1):47-61
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control
Attitude to Health
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - prevention & control
Extraction and Processing Industry
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odors - analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Perception
Petroleum
Self Concept
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper presents results from a study of the community health impacts of a petroleum refinery in Oakville, Ontario in Canada. The research is informed by the environmental stress and coping literatures and the focus is on community reappraisal of the refinery's impacts before and after the implementation of a substantive odour reduction initiative on the part of the refinery operators. Community health surveys were conducted in 1992 (n = 391) and 1997 (n = 427) to examine changes in odour perception and annoyance and self-reported health status attributable to the odour reduction plan. The findings reported here suggest an on-going process of cognitive reappraisal, whereby negative perceptions and concerns decreased between 1992 and 1997. Irrespective of this positive reappraisal of the refinery efforts, those living close to the refinery continue to report negative health impacts. A strong mediating effect of odours on the refinery exposure-symptom reporting relationship was confirmed by our results. While the relationship between odour perception and symptom reporting indicates the importance of odour perception and annoyance as the principal mechanism mediating ill-health reporting, the plausibility of other causal pathways is recognized. Residents' sensitivity to the negative effects of the refinery on their health and the health of their children suggests a psychosocial reaction to the environmental stress associated with perceived and actual refinery emissions.
PubMed ID
12137188 View in PubMed
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Effect of in situ composting on reducing offensive odors and volatile organic compounds in swineries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194854
Source
AIHAJ. 2001 Mar-Apr;62(2):159-67
Publication Type
Article
Author
K. Louhelainen
J. Kangas
A. Veijanen
P. Viilos
Author Affiliation
Kuopio Regional Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 93, Fin-70701, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
AIHAJ. 2001 Mar-Apr;62(2):159-67
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - prevention & control
Ammonia - analysis
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Finland
Humans
Hydrogen Sulfide - analysis
Occupational Exposure - prevention & control
Odors - analysis
Organic Chemicals - analysis
Refuse Disposal
Swine
Volatilization
Abstract
Seven swine farms were studied to find out how the in situ composting system, compared to the slatted floor pit system, influences the concentration and occurrence of malodorous compounds. Ammonia concentrations were measured with diffusion tubes. Small molecular sulfur compounds were analyzed using laminated bags and a gas chromatograph with a FP-detector. All other volatile organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with simultaneous sniffing of the eluted compounds. About 400 organic compounds were identified from the air samples, and 94 suspect odorous compounds are listed in the present article. The most intense and unpleasant odors were caused by p-cresol, carboxylic acids (C2-C7), and some ketones such as 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-butanone. Terpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, and limonene), which originate from sawdust, caused the main peaks in the chromatograms of compost swineries. In swine confinement buildings where the composting system was functioning properly, the concentration of sulfur compounds, and especially of carboxylic acids, ketones, and p-cresol, fell effectively. The use of sawdust as composting material caused elevated concentrations of terpenes in the ambient air. There was clearly less airborne ammonia and hydrogen sulfide in the well-functioning compost swineries than in the poorly functioning ones. Elevated hydrogen sulfide levels were measured during turning work, however. In one composting swinery, the hydrogen sulfide level was as high as 15 mg/m3 during turning work. All the other concentrations of odorous compounds did not exceed occupational exposure limit values, but several compounds exceeded the respective threshold odor concentrations.
PubMed ID
11331987 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.