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Atrial fibrillation is associated with different levels of physical activity levels at different ages in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103073
Source
Heart. 2014 Jul;100(13):1037-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Nikola Drca
Alicja Wolk
Mats Jensen-Urstad
Susanna C Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology at the Karolinska Institute, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2014 Jul;100(13):1037-42
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Bicycling
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Exercise
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Walking
Abstract
This study examines the influence of physical activity at different ages and of different types, on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF) in a large cohort of Swedish men.
Information about physical activity was obtained from 44 410 AF-free men, aged 45-79 years (mean age=60), who had completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline in 1997. Participants reported retrospectively their time spent on leisure-time exercise and on walking or bicycling throughout their lifetime (at 15, 30 and 50 years of age, and at baseline (mean age=60)). Participants were followed-up in the Swedish National Inpatient Register for ascertainment of AF. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) with 95% CIs, adjusted for potential confounders.
During a median follow-up of 12 years, 4568 cases of AF were diagnosed. We observed a RR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.36) of developing AF in men who at the age of 30 years had exercised for >5 h/week compared with 5 h/week at age 30 and quit exercising later in life (1 h/day vs almost never) and the association was similar after excluding men with previous coronary heart disease or heart failure at baseline (corresponding RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77 to 0.998).
Leisure-time exercise at younger age is associated with an increased risk of AF, whereas walking/bicycling at older age is associated with a decreased risk.
Notes
Comment In: Heart. 2014 Jul;100(13):999-100024829372
PubMed ID
24829373 View in PubMed
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Dietary folate intake and incidence of ovarian cancer: the Swedish Mammography Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9522
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Mar 3;96(5):396-402
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-2004
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Edward Giovannucci
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Mar 3;96(5):396-402
Date
Mar-3-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Carcinoma - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Humans
Incidence
Mammography
Medical Record Linkage
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ovarian Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Design
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence suggests that a low intake of the water-soluble B vitamin folate is associated with breast and colorectal carcinogenesis, especially among alcohol drinkers. However, epidemiologic data specifically linking folate intake to ovarian cancer risk are limited. METHODS: We examined the association between dietary folate intake (i.e., folate from food sources) and the incidence of total epithelial ovarian cancer and its subtypes by analyzing data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, a population-based prospective cohort of 61 084 women, aged 38-76 years, who, at baseline (i.e., from 1987 to 1990), were cancer-free and had completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Through June 30, 2003, 266 incident cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were diagnosed. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate multivariable relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Overall, dietary folate intake was weakly inversely associated with total epithelial ovarian cancer risk (RR for highest versus lowest quartile of intake = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.43 to 1.04; P(trend) =.08). Among women who consumed more than 20 g of alcohol (approximately two drinks) per week, there was a strong inverse association between dietary folate intake and total epithelial ovarian cancer risk (RR for highest versus lowest quartile of intake = 0.26, 95% CI = 0.11 to 0.60; P(trend) =.001), but among women who consumed 20 g or less of alcohol per week, there was no such association (RR for highest versus lowest quartile of intake = 1.00, 95% CI = 0.59 to 1.70; P(trend) =.80). The absolute risk of epithelial ovarian cancer for the lowest three quartiles versus the highest quartile of folate intake was 8 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI = 0 to 16 per 100 000 person-years) overall and 26 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI = 10 to 42 per 100 000 person-years) among those who consumed more than 20 g of alcohol per week. The association between dietary folate intake and cancer risk did not vary substantially among subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer. CONCLUSION: A high dietary folate intake may play a role in reducing the risk of ovarian cancer, especially among women who consume alcohol.
PubMed ID
14996861 View in PubMed
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Dietary patterns associated with colon and rectal cancer: results from the Dietary Patterns and Cancer (DIETSCAN) Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17474
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):1003-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
L Beth Dixon
Helena F Balder
Mikko J Virtanen
Bahram Rashidkhani
Satu Männistö
Vittorio Krogh
Piet A van Den Brandt
Anne M Hartman
Pirjo Pietinen
Frans Tan
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
R Alexandra Goldbohm
Author Affiliation
New York University, Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, New York, NY, USA. beth.dixon@nyu.edu
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):1003-11
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Meat
Meat products
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Solanum tuberosum
Sweden - epidemiology
Swine
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An analysis of dietary patterns or combinations of foods may provide insight regarding the influence of diet on the risk of colon and rectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: A primary aim of the Dietary Patterns and Cancer (DIETSCAN) Project was to develop and apply a common methodologic approach to study dietary patterns and cancer in 4 European cohorts: the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (Finland-ATBC), the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS) on Diet and Cancer, the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC), and the Ormoni e Dieta nella Eziologia dei Tumori (Italy-ORDET). Three cohorts (ATBC, NLCS, and SMC) provided data on colon and rectal cancer for the present study. DESIGN: The cohorts were established between 1985 and 1992; follow-up data were obtained from national cancer registries. The participants completed validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaires at baseline. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis, conducted within each cohort, identified 3-5 stable dietary patterns. Two dietary patterns-Vegetables and Pork, Processed Meats, Potatoes (PPP)-were common across all cohorts. After adjustment for potential confounders, PPP was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in the SMC women (quintile 4(multivariate) relative risk: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.34; P for trend = 0.01). PPP was also associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer in the ATBC men (quintile 4(multivariate) relative risk: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.07, 4.57; P for trend = 0.05). Neither pattern was associated with the risk of colon or rectal cancer in the NLCS women and men. CONCLUSION: Although certain dietary patterns may be consistent across European countries, associations between these dietary patterns and the risk of colon and rectal cancer are not conclusive.
PubMed ID
15447912 View in PubMed
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Fatty fish consumption lowers the risk of endometrial cancer: a nationwide case-control study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19332
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Jan;11(1):143-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Paul Terry
Alicja Wolk
Harri Vainio
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. pterry@aecom.yu.edu
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Jan;11(1):143-5
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Diet
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The consumption of fatty fish, which contains large amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, may lower the risk of hormone-responsive cancers. Our aim was to study the association of fish consumption and endometrial cancer risk in Sweden, a country with a wide range of high fatty fish consumption. Using data from a large, nationwide case-control study (709 cases and 2888 controls), we analyzed consumption of both fatty (e.g., salmon and herring) and lean (e.g., cod and flounder) fish in relation to endometrial cancer risk, adjusting estimates for a wide range of potentially confounding variables. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed from unconditional logistic regression models fit by maximum likelihood methods. Consumption of fatty fish was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk. The multivariate OR for women in the highest quartile level (median, 2.0 servings per week), compared to women with in the lowest (median, 0.2 servings per week), was 0.6 (95% CI, 0.5-0.8; P for trend, 0.0002). The corresponding OR for women in the highest quartile level of lean fish (median, 2.5 servings per week), compared to women in the lowest (median, 0.6 servings per week), was 1.0 (95% CI, 0.8-1.3; P-value for trend, 0.72). Total fish consumption was inversely associated with risk, although weakly. Our results suggest that the consumption of fatty fish, but not other types of fish, may decrease the risk of endometrial cancer.
PubMed ID
11815413 View in PubMed
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Fish consumption and breast cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18525
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;44(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Paul Terry
Thomas E Rohan
Alicja Wolk
Marianne Maehle-Schmidt
Cecilia Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2002;44(1):1-6
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Animals
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Fishes - classification
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Risk assessment
Seafood - classification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The omega-3 fatty acids, especially long-chain eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3) contained in "fatty" fish, have consistently been shown to retard the growth of breast cancer in vitro and in animal experiments. In contrast, studies of the association between fish consumption and breast cancer risk in human populations have not consistently shown inverse associations. However, previous studies have not considered the specific types of fish consumed. Using data from a large, nationwide case-control study conducted in Sweden, we examined the association between consumption of fatty and lean fish and breast cancer risk. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were computed from unconditional logistic regression models. High consumption of fish was weakly associated with reduced breast cancer risk, and the association was not statistically significant. With multivariate adjustment, the OR for women with the highest consumption (> or =3.5 servings/wk) compared with women with the lowest (virtually none) was 0.88 (95% confidence interval = 0.60-1.29, P for trend = 0.15). When type of fish was examined separately, the association was similar for fatty and lean fish.
PubMed ID
12672635 View in PubMed
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Folate intake and pancreatic cancer incidence: a prospective study of Swedish women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8997
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Mar 15;98(6):407-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2006
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Niclas Håkansson
Edward Giovannucci
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Mar 15;98(6):407-13
Date
Mar-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Anticarcinogenic Agents - administration & dosage - metabolism
Dietary Supplements
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - metabolism
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence supports an association between high folate intake and reduced risk of some cancers, in particular colorectal cancer. However, epidemiologic data concerning the relationship between folate and pancreatic cancer risk are sparse. We examined the association between folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer in a population-based prospective study of Swedish women and men. METHODS: We prospectively followed 81,922 women and men in the Swedish Mammography Cohort and the Cohort of Swedish Men who were cancer-free and completed a 96-item food-frequency questionnaire in 1997. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate multivariable rate ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: A total of 135 incident pancreatic cancer cases were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 6.8 years. In multivariable analyses controlling for age, smoking, fruit and vegetable consumption, and other potential confounders, dietary and total folate intakes were statistically significantly inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. The multivariable rate ratios of pancreatic cancer for those in the highest category of folate intake (> or = 350 microg/day) compared with the lowest category of intake ( or = 300 microg/day compared with 0 microg/day of supplemental folic acid, multivariable RR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.56 to 1.88). The sex- and age-standardized incidence rates of pancreatic cancer per 100,000 person-years were 41 for the lowest and 18 for the highest category of dietary folate intake. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that increased intake of folate from food sources, but not from supplements, may be associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer.
PubMed ID
16537833 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable intake and rate of heart failure: a population-based prospective cohort of women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266309
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Susanne Rautiainen
Emily B Levitan
Murray A Mittleman
Alicja Wolk
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2015 Jan;17(1):20-6
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Female
Fruit
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Although numerous studies have investigated fruit and vegetable consumption in association with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) such as coronary heart disease and stroke, a limited number of studies have investigated the association with heart failure. The aim of this study was to assess the association between fruit and vegetable intake and the incidence of heart failure among women.
In September 1997, a total of 34,319 women (aged 49-83 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, free of cancer and CVD at baseline, completed a food-frequency questionnaire. Women were followed for incident heart failure (diagnosis as primary or secondary cause) through December 2011 using administrative health registries. Over 12.9?years of follow-up (442,348 person-years), we identified 3051 incident cases of heart failure. Total fruit and vegetable consumption was inversely associated with the rate of heart failure {the multivariable-adjusted rate ratio (RR) in the highest quintile compared with the lowest was 0.80 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-0.90]}. Fruit (mutually adjusted for vegetables) were not significantly associated with rate of heart failure (RR 0.94; 95% CI 0.83-1.07), whereas vegetables showed an inverse association (RR 0.83; 95% CI 0.73-0.95). When investigating the shape of association, we found evidence of a non-linear association (P = 0.01), and the lowest rates of heart failure were observed among women consuming =5 servings/day of fruit and vegetables, without further decrease with increasing intake.
In this population-based prospective cohort study of women, higher total consumption of fruit and vegetables was inversely associated with the incidence of heart failure.
PubMed ID
25382356 View in PubMed
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Glycemic load, glycemic index and carbohydrate intake in relation to risk of stomach cancer: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76351
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jun 15;118(12):3167-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2006
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Leif Bergkvist
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Jun 15;118(12):3167-9
Date
Jun-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glycemic Index
Humans
Incidence
Insulin - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - metabolism
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The glycemic effects of diets high in refined grains and starchy foods might increase stomach cancer risk by affecting circulating glucose, insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I levels. No prospective data on the role of high glycemic load and glycemic index diets on stomach cancer risk have been reported. We therefore prospectively investigated dietary glycemic load, overall glycemic index and carbohydrate intake in relation to the incidence of stomach cancer among 61,433 women in the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort. Diet was assessed at baseline (1987-1990) and again in 1997. During 903,586 person-years of follow-up, a total of 156 incident cases of stomach cancer were ascertained. We observed no material associations of dietary glycemic load, overall glycemic index and total carbohydrate intake with the risk of stomach cancer. The multivariate hazard ratios for the highest versus the lowest quintile were 0.76 (95% CI = 0.46-1.25) for glycemic load, 0.77 (95% CI = 0.46-1.30) for overall glycemic index and 0.85 (95% CI = 0.50-1.43) for carbohydrate intake. The associations did not vary according to body mass index. Lack of information on Helicobacter pylori infection status did not allow stratification by this potential effect modifier. Findings from this population-based prospective cohort of middle-aged and elderly women did not provide evidence of a positive association between glycemic load, glycemic index and carbohydrate intake with risk of stomach cancer.
PubMed ID
16395707 View in PubMed
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High-fat dairy food and conjugated linoleic acid intakes in relation to colorectal cancer incidence in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16712
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Oct;82(4):894-900
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Leif Bergkvist
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, the National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@imm.ki.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Oct;82(4):894-900
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Dairy Products
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Linoleic Acids, Conjugated - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: High-fat dairy foods contain many potentially anticarcinogenic factors, including conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). However, few epidemiologic studies have specifically evaluated high-fat dairy food consumption, and none have evaluated CLA intake, in relation to colorectal cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to prospectively examine the associations of long-term high-fat dairy food consumption and CLA intake and the incidence of colorectal cancer. DESIGN: Our study population consisted of 60 708 women aged 40-76 y who participated in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. The women's consumption of high-fat dairy foods was assessed at baseline, which was from 1987 to 1990, and again in 1997. RESULTS: We ascertained 798 incident cases of colorectal cancer during an average 14.8 y of follow-up. After adjustment for age and other potential confounders, the women who consumed > or =4 servings of high-fat dairy foods/d (including whole milk, full-fat cultured milk, cheese, cream, sour cream, and butter) had a multivariate rate ratio of colorectal cancer of 0.59 (95% CI: 0.44, 0.79; P for trend = 0.002) when compared with the women who consumed
PubMed ID
16210722 View in PubMed
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Is There Any Role for Serum Cathepsin S and CRP Levels on Prognostic Information in Breast Cancer? The Swedish Mammography Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276204
Source
Antioxid Redox Signal. 2015 Dec 1;23(16):1298-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Samar Basu
Holly Harris
Anders Larsson
Marie-Paule Vasson
Alicja Wolk
Source
Antioxid Redox Signal. 2015 Dec 1;23(16):1298-302
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biomarkers
Breast Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - mortality
C-Reactive Protein
Case-Control Studies
Cathepsins - blood
Humans
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prognosis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, and both low-grade inflammation and cathepsins might have important roles in breast cancer. We questioned whether prediagnostic circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), cathepsin B, and cathepsin S were associated with breast cancer risk. Sixty-nine incident breast cancer cases diagnosed after blood collection and 719 controls from the Swedish Mammography Cohort were analyzed for systemic CRP, cathepsin B, and cathepsin S. Cathepsin S and inflammation (high-sensitivity CRP [hsCRP])-adjusted cathepsin S were inversely associated with breast cancer risk (cathepsin S: odds ratio [OR] for top vs. bottom tertile=0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.23-0.92; p(trend)=0.02; hsCRP-adjusted cathepsin S: OR of 0.44; 95% CI=0.22-0.87; p(trend)=0.02). hsCRP was significantly associated with increased breast cancer risk (OR for top vs. bottom tertile=2.01; 95% CI=1.02-3.95; p(trend)=0.04). No significant association was observed between cathepsin B and breast cancer risk (OR for top vs. bottom tertile=0.67; 95% CI=0.32-1.40; ptrend=0.30). These observations lead to the hypothesis that levels of cathepsin S and hsCRP observed in women who later developed breast cancer may provide prognostic information regarding tumor development and need to be evaluated in prospective studies.
PubMed ID
26079659 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.