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Comments on 'The performance of different propensity score methods for estimating marginal odds ratios'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157929
Source
Stat Med. 2008 Aug 30;27(19):3915-7; author reply 3918-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-30-2008
Author
Erika Graf
Martin Schumacher
Source
Stat Med. 2008 Aug 30;27(19):3915-7; author reply 3918-20
Date
Aug-30-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Notes
Comment On: Stat Med. 2007 Jul 20;26(16):3078-9417187347
PubMed ID
18384189 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of social class in childhood and adulthood on adult mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35796
Source
Lancet. 1994 May 14;343(8907):1224-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-14-1994
Author
D. Vågerö
D. Leon
Source
Lancet. 1994 May 14;343(8907):1224-5
Date
May-14-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Humans
Male
Mortality
Odds Ratio
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 1994 Feb 26;343(8896):524-77906766
PubMed ID
7909885 View in PubMed
Less detail

A temporal analysis of rain-related crash risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220577
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1993 Aug;25(4):465-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
J. Andrey
S. Yagar
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1993 Aug;25(4):465-72
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Humans
Odds Ratio
Rain
Risk
Abstract
The study presents empirical evidence of accident risk during and following rain events in the cities of Calgary and Edmonton, Canada. The matched sample approach is used to examine data for 169 rain events and over 15,000 accidents that occurred during the years 1979-1983. The overall accident risk during rainfall conditions was found to be 70% higher than normal. The data suggest that accident risk returns to normal as soon as the rainfall has ended, despite the lingering effects of wet road conditions.
PubMed ID
8357460 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cellular telephones and risk of brain tumours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19897
Source
Lancet. 2001 Mar 24;357(9260):960-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-24-2001
Author
L. Hardell
K H Mild
Source
Lancet. 2001 Mar 24;357(9260):960-1
Date
Mar-24-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Sweden - epidemiology
Telephone
Notes
Comment On: Lancet. 2000 Nov 25;356(9244):1837-4011117928
PubMed ID
11289377 View in PubMed
Less detail

Breast cancer risk in mothers of twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22341
Source
Br J Cancer. 1997;75(7):1066-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
M F Murphy
M J Broeders
L M Carpenter
J. Gunnarskog
D A Leon
Author Affiliation
ICRF General Practice Research Group, Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford, UK.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1997;75(7):1066-8
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Odds Ratio
Parity
Steroids - physiology
Sweden
Twins
Abstract
The risk of breast cancer associated with delivering a twin birth was examined in a population-based nested case-control study of nearly 4800 Swedish women with breast cancer and 47000 age-matched control subjects. All were aged less than 50 years and parous. After adjustment for age at first birth and parity, a 29% reduction in breast cancer risk was observed in mothers of twins relative to those who were not (odds ratio = 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.91). These results provide evidence that women who bear twins are at reduced risk of breast cancer, one explanation for which may be their unusual levels of hormonal exposure.
PubMed ID
9083344 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Pathol Res Pract. 1990 Feb;186(1):92-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
H. Tulinius
H. Sigvaldason
G. Olafsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Cancer Registry, Reykjavík.
Source
Pathol Res Pract. 1990 Feb;186(1):92-4
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Family
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Abstract
Many studies have shown that unilateral breast cancer is more frequent in the left breast than in the right. This has been investigated in the Icelandic Cancer Registry. Information on all but 18 female breast cancer cases diagnosed in the forty-year-period from 1948 to 1987, a total of 2139 cases, was used. Of these 2011 were unilateral, 1069 were in the left breast, an excess of 13%. Primary breast cancer in both breasts was diagnosed in 81 women, 35 in the left breast first, and 46 in the right breast first. The excess risk of developing cancer remains for the left breast also for women who have already lost one breast because of cancer. Information on whether their relatives had developed breast cancer existed for 1197 of these women. Patients with an affected first degree relative were of 2.54 fold risk of developing contralateral primary breast cancer, but women with no affected relative were at a reduced risk (not significant). Patients with right sided breast cancer are more likely to have a relative with breast cancer. The breast cancer status of the relatives did not influence the risk of death, so a better survival of familial cases could not be shown.
PubMed ID
2315217 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bidi and hookah use among Canadian youth: an examination of data from the 2006 Canadian Youth Smoking Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133480
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2011 Jul;49(1):102-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Wing C Chan
Scott T Leatherdale
Robin Burkhalter
Rashid Ahmed
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2011 Jul;49(1):102-4
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Smoking - epidemiology
Water
Abstract
To examine the prevalence and associated factors of bidi and hookah use among Canadian youth.
Data from 41,886 grade 7 to 12 youth were used to examine factors associated with bidi and hookah use.
Youth who are current or former cigarette smokers, have tried marijuana or alcohol, were more likely to use bidi or hookah.
Results suggest bidi and hookah use may be an emerging issue in tobacco control among youth. Findings also support an integrated approach where future prevention efforts should address multiple risk behaviors.
PubMed ID
21700168 View in PubMed
Less detail

Occupational exposures and risk of rheumatoid arthritis: continued advances and opportunities for research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93062
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Jun;35(6):950-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Cooper Glinda S
Source
J Rheumatol. 2008 Jun;35(6):950-2
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: J Rheumatol. 2008 Jun;35(6):1145-5018412300
PubMed ID
18528947 View in PubMed
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Month of birth as a latitude-dependent risk factor for multiple sclerosis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117880
Source
Mult Scler. 2013 Jul;19(8):1028-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Nina Grytten
Øivind Torkildsen
Jan Harald Aarseth
Espen Benjaminsen
Elisabeth Gulowsen Celius
Ole Petter Dahl
Trygve Holmøy
Kristin Løken-Amsrud
Rune Midgard
Kjell-Morten Myhr
Geir Risberg
Anita Vatne
Margitta T Kampman
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Multiple Sclerosis Competence Centre, Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. nina.grytten@helse-bergen.no
Source
Mult Scler. 2013 Jul;19(8):1028-34
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
We aimed to determine if the risk of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is associated with month of birth in Norway and to explore a possible latitudinal gradient.
All patients with MS born between 1930 and 1979 registered in the Norwegian MS Registry or ascertained in Norwegian prevalence studies were included (n = 6649). The latitude gradient was divided in Southern, Middle and Northern Norway, according to the estimated regional yearly mean vitamin D effective UV dose.
Risk of MS was 11% higher for those born in April (p = 0.045), and 5% higher for those born in May (p = 0.229), 5% lower for those born in November (p = 0.302) and 12% lower for those born in February (p = 0.053) compared with the corresponding population, unaffected mothers and siblings. In Southern Norway the odds ratio of MS births in April and May was 1.05 (0.98-1.24), in Middle Norway 1.11 (0.97-1.27) and in Northern Norway 1.28 (1.0-1.63) compared with the other months.
This study confirms previous reports of increased MS births in spring and decreased MS births in the winter months. This could support the role of decreased sunlight exposure during pregnancy and vitamin D deficiency in prenatal life in MS.
PubMed ID
23257620 View in PubMed
Less detail

Regional differences in the incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus among children in Finland from 1987 to 1991. Childhood Diabetes in Finland (DiMe) Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207761
Source
Ann Med. 1997 Aug;29(4):297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
M. Karvonen
J. Rusanen
M. Sundberg
E. Virtala
A. Colpaert
A. Naukkarinen
J. Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. Marjatta.Karvonen@ktl.fi
Source
Ann Med. 1997 Aug;29(4):297-304
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Odds Ratio
Urbanization
Abstract
The regional pattern of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) incidence among children in Finland was analysed applying several methods attempting to describe the geographical variation in occurrence of IDDM. From 1987 to 1991 the number of newly diagnosed cases aged 14 years or less at diagnosis was 1728. The incidence, the incidence rate ratio and the Bayes relative risk (RR) for IDDM were calculated by municipality, by functional area (an urban centre with a subordinated surrounding area) and by area with a population of equal size at risk employing the Geographical Information Systems. The association of IDDM incidence with the degree of urbanization was assessed using the population density as a criterion for the degree of urbanization. The overall mean of the IDDM incidence was 35 per 100000 persons per year. Between municipalities the incidence varied from 4 to 245 per 100000 persons per year, whereas a clear regional pattern was seen among the functional areas and the incidence varied from 26 to 43 per 100000 persons per year. The RR for IDDM among the municipalities ranged from 0.82 to 1.34 and from 0.73 to 1.27 among the functional areas. The incidence determined in four zones with the same size of population was the highest in the middle part of the country. There was a strong inverse correlation between population density and the incidence of IDDM and this also applied to the relationship between child population density and incidence.
PubMed ID
9375986 View in PubMed
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5385 records – page 1 of 539.