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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Greenland ice sheet to get underhand inspection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95842
Source
Nature. 2004 Aug 26;430(7003):955
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2004
Author
Haag Amanda
Source
Nature. 2004 Aug 26;430(7003):955
Date
Aug-26-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Greenhouse Effect
Greenland
Ice
Marine Biology
Oceanography
PubMed ID
15329684 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Washington
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Recently Funded Projects
Meteorology
Research Personnel
Oceanography
Ecology
Ice Cover
Abstract
A group of investigators conducting interdisciplinary research on the oceanography, climatology, meteorology, biology, and ecology of the ice-covered regions on Earth and elsewhere in the solar system.
Online Resources
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University of Hawaii Sea Level Center (UHSLC)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288568
Publication Type
Dataset
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Hawaii
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dataset
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Northern communities
Storms, Floods, Erosion, & Sea Level Rise
Oceanography
Climate
Research
Abstract
UHSLC collects, processes, analyzes, and distributes tide gauge data from around the world in support of climate and oceanographic research.
Online Resources
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Variations in behavior and condition of a Southern Ocean top predator in relation to in situ oceanographic conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83719
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 21;104(34):13705-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2007
Author
Biuw M.
Boehme L.
Guinet C.
Hindell M.
Costa D.
Charrassin J-B
Roquet F.
Bailleul F.
Meredith M.
Thorpe S.
Tremblay Y.
McDonald B.
Park Y-H
Rintoul S R
Bindoff N.
Goebel M.
Crocker D.
Lovell P.
Nicholson J.
Monks F.
Fedak M A
Author Affiliation
Natural Environment Research Council Sea Mammal Research Unit, Gatty Marine Laboratory, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 8LB, United Kingdom. martin.biuw@npolar.no
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Aug 21;104(34):13705-10
Date
Aug-21-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Ecology
Oceanography
Pinnipedia - physiology
Population Dynamics
Predatory Behavior - physiology
Seasons
Abstract
Responses by marine top predators to environmental variability have previously been almost impossible to observe directly. By using animal-mounted instruments simultaneously recording movements, diving behavior, and in situ oceanographic properties, we studied the behavioral and physiological responses of southern elephant seals to spatial environmental variability throughout their circumpolar range. Improved body condition of seals in the Atlantic sector was associated with Circumpolar Deep Water upwelling regions within the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, whereas High-Salinity Shelf Waters or temperature/salinity gradients under winter pack ice were important in the Indian and Pacific sectors. Energetic consequences of these variations could help explain recently observed population trends, showing the usefulness of this approach in examining the sensitivity of top predators to global and regional-scale climate variability.
PubMed ID
17693555 View in PubMed
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Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2015
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Feb 15;91(1):12
Date
Feb-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Fiber Optic Technology - methods - trends
Oceanography - instrumentation - methods - trends
Robotics - methods - trends
PubMed ID
25806388 View in PubMed
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Disappearing glaciers and the rising sea

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288462
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of California Television (UCTV)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Glaciers & Ice Sheets
Ice Cover
Oceanography
Oceans and Seas
Abstract
Video presented by Shad O'Neel, PhD, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, as part of the 2008 series "Perspectives on Ocean Science." Dr. O'Neel provides a tour of coastal glaciers and explains why scientists believe these glaciers' unique behavior will make them one of the largest contributors to sea level rise in the next century. [56:45 min]
Online Resources
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Climate science: The long summer begins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95518
Source
Nature. 2008 Jul 17;454(7202):266-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2008
Author
Schiermeier Quirin
Source
Nature. 2008 Jul 17;454(7202):266-9
Date
Jul-17-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Greenhouse Effect
Oceanography - methods
Oceans and Seas
Seasons
Notes
Erratum In: Nature. 2008 Sep 11;455(7210):151
PubMed ID
18633390 View in PubMed
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Distribution and trajectories of floating and benthic marine macrolitter in the south-eastern North Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296978
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jun; 131(Pt A):763-772
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Lars Gutow
Marcel Ricker
Jan M Holstein
Jennifer Dannheim
Emil V Stanev
Jörg-Olaf Wolff
Author Affiliation
Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven, Germany. Electronic address: Lars.Gutow@awi.de.
Source
Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Jun; 131(Pt A):763-772
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
North Sea
Oceanography - methods
Spatio-Temporal Analysis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Waste Products - analysis
Abstract
In coastal waters the identification of sources, trajectories and deposition sites of marine litter is often hampered by the complex oceanography of shallow shelf seas. We conducted a multi-annual survey on litter at the sea surface and on the seafloor in the south-eastern North Sea. Bottom trawling was identified as a major source of marine litter. Oceanographic modelling revealed that the distribution of floating litter in the North Sea is largely determined by the site of origin of floating objects whereas the trajectories are strongly influenced by wind drag. Methods adopted from species distribution modelling indicated that resuspension of benthic litter and near-bottom transport processes strongly influence the distribution of litter on the seafloor. Major sink regions for floating marine litter were identified at the west coast of Denmark and in the Skagerrak. Our results may support the development of strategies to reduce the pollution of the North Sea.
PubMed ID
29887004 View in PubMed
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Sea ice retreat alters the biogeography of the Bering Sea continental shelf.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93158
Source
Ecol Appl. 2008 Mar;18(2):309-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Mueter Franz J
Litzow Michael A
Author Affiliation
Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and the Oceans, P.O. Box 354235, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98115 USA. fmueter@alaska.net
Source
Ecol Appl. 2008 Mar;18(2):309-20
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Greenhouse Effect
Ice
Oceanography
Oceans and Seas
Seawater
Temperature
Time Factors
Abstract
Seasonal ice cover creates a pool of cold bottom water on the eastern Bering Sea continental shelf each winter. The southern edge of this cold pool, which defines the ecotone between arctic and subarctic communities, has retreated approximately 230 km northward since the early 1980s. Bottom trawl surveys of fish and invertebrates in the southeastern Bering Sea (1982-2006) show a coincident reorganization in community composition by latitude. Survey catches show community-wide northward distribution shifts, and the area formerly covered by the cold pool has seen increases in total biomass, species richness, and average trophic level as subarctic fauna have colonized newly favorable habitats. Warming climate has immediate management implications, as 57% of variability in commercial snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) catch is explained by winter sea ice extent. Several measures of community distribution and structure show linear relationships with bottom temperature, suggesting warming climate as the primary cause of changing biogeography. However, residual variability in distribution not explained by climate shows a strong temporal trend, suggesting that internal community dynamics also contribute to changing biogeography. Variability among taxa in their response to temperature was not explained by commercial status or life history traits, suggesting that species-specific responses to future warming will be difficult to predict.
PubMed ID
18488598 View in PubMed
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Climate change and the marine ecosystem of the western Antarctic Peninsula.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95644
Source
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2007 Jan 29;362(1477):149-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-2007
Author
Clarke Andrew
Murphy Eugene J
Meredith Michael P
King John C
Peck Lloyd S
Barnes David K A
Smith Raymond C
Author Affiliation
British Antarctic Survey, NERC, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK. accl@bas.ac.uk
Source
Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. 2007 Jan 29;362(1477):149-66
Date
Jan-29-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antarctic Regions
Ecosystem
Food chain
Greenhouse Effect
Ice Cover
Invertebrates - physiology
Oceanography
Oceans and Seas
Population Dynamics
Temperature
Abstract
The Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing one of the fastest rates of regional climate change on Earth, resulting in the collapse of ice shelves, the retreat of glaciers and the exposure of new terrestrial habitat. In the nearby oceanic system, winter sea ice in the Bellingshausen and Amundsen seas has decreased in extent by 10% per decade, and shortened in seasonal duration. Surface waters have warmed by more than 1 K since the 1950s, and the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current has also warmed. Of the changes observed in the marine ecosystem of the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) region to date, alterations in winter sea ice dynamics are the most likely to have had a direct impact on the marine fauna, principally through shifts in the extent and timing of habitat for ice-associated biota. Warming of seawater at depths below ca 100 m has yet to reach the levels that are biologically significant. Continued warming, or a change in the frequency of the flooding of CDW onto the WAP continental shelf may, however, induce sublethal effects that influence ecological interactions and hence food-web operation. The best evidence for recent changes in the ecosystem may come from organisms which record aspects of their population dynamics in their skeleton (such as molluscs or brachiopods) or where ecological interactions are preserved (such as in encrusting biota of hard substrata). In addition, a southwards shift of marine isotherms may induce a parallel migration of some taxa similar to that observed on land. The complexity of the Southern Ocean food web and the nonlinear nature of many interactions mean that predictions based on short-term studies of a small number of species are likely to be misleading.
PubMed ID
17405211 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.