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Are subjective health complaints a result of modern civilization?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70895
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(2):122-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hege R Eriksen
Brit Hellesnes
Peer Staff
Holger Ursin
Author Affiliation
Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, N-5000, Norway. hege.eriksen@psych.uib.no
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2004;11(2):122-5
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ethnology
Female
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Interview, Psychological
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Philippines
Sick Role
Social Isolation
Somatoform Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Urbanization
Abstract
Subjective health complaints without or with minimal somatic findings (pain, fatigue) are common and frequent reasons for encounter with the general practitioner and for long-term sickness leave and disability. The complaints are often attributed to the stressors of modern life. Is this true? We interviewed 120 Aborigine Mangyans (native population, M age = 33.5 years, 72.5% women) living under primitive conditions in the jungle of Mindoro, an island in the Philippines, and 101 persons living in a small coastal town on the same island (coastal population, M age = 33.8 years, 60.4% women). Both groups had more musculoskeletal complaints, fatigue, mood changes, and gastrointestinal complaints than a representative sample from the Norwegian population (N = 1,243). Our common subjective health complaints, therefore, are not specific for industrialized societies.
PubMed ID
15456682 View in PubMed
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