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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mental health: paradise lost?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127344
Source
Med J Aust. 2012 Feb 6;196:89-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-6-2012
Author
Robert M Parker
Source
Med J Aust. 2012 Feb 6;196:89-90
Date
Feb-6-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Intellectual Disability - ethnology
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology
Mental Health - ethnology
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Psychotic Disorders - ethnology
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology
Notes
Comment On: Med J Aust. 2012 Feb 6;196:133-522304609
Comment On: Med J Aust. 2012 Feb 6;196:118-2122304605
PubMed ID
22304588 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's experience when interacting with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: a brief note.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157234
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Alistair Campbell
Barbara Hayes
Beryl Buckby
Author Affiliation
James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. alistair.campbell@jcu.edu.au
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2008 Jun;16(3):124-31
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression, Postpartum - diagnosis - ethnology
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Women's health
Abstract
The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is one of the most widely used screening instruments for maternal perinatal anxiety and depression. It has maintained its robust performance when translated into multiple languages, when used prenatally and when used with perinatal fathers; thus the tool is also known as the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS). However, there have been no published psychometric data on versions of the EPDS adapted for screening Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. We describe the development of 'translations' of the EPDS and report their basic psychometric properties.
During the Queensland arm of the beyond blue National Postnatal Depression Program (2001-2005), partnerships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women were forged. At TAIHS' stand alone "Mums and Babies" unit 181 women of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent were recruited into the study through their antenatal and postnatal visits and 25 were recruited at Mt Isa. Participants completed either the translation or the standard version of the EPDS both antenatally and postnatally.
The 'translations' of the EPDS demonstrated a high level of reliability. The was a strong correlation between the 'translations' and the EPDS. The 'translations' and the standard EPDS both identified high rates of women at risk of depression although the 'translations' identified higher rates.
We argue that the 'translation' may have been a more accurate predictor of perinatal women at risk for depression, but acknowledge that a lack of validity evidence weakens this conclusion.
PubMed ID
18471181 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's health: acting now for a healthy future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153251
Source
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2008 Dec;48(6):526-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jacqueline Boyle
Alice R Rumbold
Marilyn Clarke
Chris Hughes
Simon Kane
Source
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2008 Dec;48(6):526-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Forecasting
Gynecology - standards
Humans
Maternal Age
Obstetrics - standards
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This paper summarises the recent RANZCOG Indigenous Women's Health Meeting with recommendations on how the College and its membership can act now to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and infants.
PubMed ID
19133037 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander worldviews and cultural safety transforming sexual assault service provision for children and young people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107796
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Sep;10(9):3818-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Leticia Funston
Author Affiliation
NSW Health Education Centre Against Violence, Locked Bag 7118, Parramatta BC, NSW 2150, Australia. Leticia.Funston@swahs.health.nsw.gov.au
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Sep;10(9):3818-33
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse, Sexual
Child Health Services
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group - ethnology
Social Work
Abstract
Child Sexual Assault (CSA) in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a complex issue that cannot be understood in isolation from the ongoing impacts of colonial invasion, genocide, assimilation, institutionalised racism and severe socio-economic deprivation. Service responses to CSA are often experienced as racist, culturally, financially and/or geographically inaccessible. A two-day forum, National Yarn Up: Sharing the Wisdoms and Challenges of Young People and Sexual Abuse, was convened by sexual assault services to identify the main practice and policy concerns regarding working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people (C&YP), families and communities in the context of CSA. The forum also aimed to explore how services can become more accountable and better engaged with the communities they are designed to support. The forum was attended by eighty invited Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal youth sexual assault managers and workers representing both "victim" and "those who sexually harm others" services. In keeping with Aboriginal Community-Based Research methods forum participants largely directed discussions and contributed to the analysis of key themes and recommendations reported in this article. The need for sexual assault services to prioritise cultural safety by meaningfully integrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Worldviews emerged as a key recommendation. It was also identified that collaboration between "victims" and "those who sexually harm" services are essential given Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander C&YP who sexually harm others may have also been victims of sexual assault or physical violence and intergenerational trauma. By working with the whole family and community, a collaborative approach is more likely than the current service model to develop cultural safety and thus increase the accessibility of sexual assault services.
Notes
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Cites: Trauma Violence Abuse. 2010 Apr;11(2):59-7020430798
PubMed ID
23975109 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal birth cohort (ABC): a prospective cohort study of early life determinants of adiposity and associated risk factors among Aboriginal people in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112767
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:608
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Gita Wahi
Julie Wilson
Ruby Miller
Rebecca Anglin
Sarah McDonald
Katherine M Morrison
Koon K Teo
Sonia S Anand
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON L8S 4K1, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:608
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - ethnology
Adult
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - ethnology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Aboriginal people living in Canada have a high prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). To better understand the pre and postnatal influences on the development of adiposity and related cardio-metabolic factors in adult Aboriginal people, we will recruit and follow prospectively Aboriginal pregnant mothers and their children - the Aboriginal Birth Cohort (ABC) study.
We aim to recruit 300 Aboriginal pregnant mothers and their newborns from the Six Nations Reserve, and follow them prospectively to age 3 years. Key details of environment and health including maternal nutrition, glucose tolerance, physical activity, and weight gain will be collected. At birth, cord blood and placenta samples will be collected, as well as newborn anthropometric measurements. Mothers and offspring will be followed annually with serial measurements of diet and physical activity, growth trajectory, and adiposity.
There is an urgent need to understand maternal and child factors that underlie the early development of adiposity and type 2 diabetes in Aboriginal people. The information generated from this cohort will assist the Six Nations community in developing interventions to prevent early adiposity in Aboriginal children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23800270 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal children are still twice as likely to die as other young Australians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154980
Source
BMJ. 2008;337:a1852
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Source
Australas Radiol. 1983 Mar;27(1):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983
Author
E M Bateson
T. Labrooy
Source
Australas Radiol. 1983 Mar;27(1):45-9
Date
Mar-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Radius Fractures - etiology - radiography
Ulna Fractures - etiology - radiography
PubMed ID
6882302 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Med J Aust. 1981 Oct 17;2(8):386-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-17-1981
Author
P. Baume
Source
Med J Aust. 1981 Oct 17;2(8):386-7
Date
Oct-17-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dental Health Services - economics
Health Services - economics
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
PubMed ID
7321959 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal health workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124122
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anna P Dawson
Margaret Cargo
Harold Stewart
Alwin Chong
Mark Daniel
Author Affiliation
University of South Australia, Sansom Institute for Health Research, Social Epidemiology and Evaluation Research Group, GPO Box 2471, IPC: CEA-01, Adelaide, South Australia, 5001, Australia.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:27
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Competency
Delivery of Health Care - ethnology - methods
Female
Focus Groups
Health Manpower - statistics & numerical data
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Oceanic Ancestry Group - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Long-term measures to reduce tobacco consumption in Australia have had differential effects in the population. The prevalence of smoking in Aboriginal peoples is currently more than double that of the non-Aboriginal population. Aboriginal Health Workers are responsible for providing primary health care to Aboriginal clients including smoking cessation programs. However, Aboriginal Health Workers are frequently smokers themselves, and their smoking undermines the smoking cessation services they deliver to Aboriginal clients. An understanding of the barriers to quitting smoking experienced by Aboriginal Health Workers is needed to design culturally relevant smoking cessation programs. Once smoking is reduced in Aboriginal Health Workers, they may then be able to support Aboriginal clients to quit smoking.
We undertook a fundamental qualitative description study underpinned by social ecological theory. The research was participatory, and academic researchers worked in partnership with personnel from the local Aboriginal health council. The barriers Aboriginal Health Workers experience in relation to quitting smoking were explored in 34 semi-structured interviews (with 23 Aboriginal Health Workers and 11 other health staff) and 3 focus groups (n = 17 participants) with key informants. Content analysis was performed on transcribed text and interview notes.
Aboriginal Health Workers spoke of burdensome stress and grief which made them unable to prioritise quitting smoking. They lacked knowledge about quitting and access to culturally relevant quitting resources. Interpersonal obstacles included a social pressure to smoke, social exclusion when quitting, and few role models. In many workplaces, smoking was part of organisational culture and there were challenges to implementation of Smokefree policy. Respondents identified inadequate funding of tobacco programs and a lack of Smokefree public spaces as policy level barriers. The normalisation of smoking in Aboriginal society was an overarching challenge to quitting.
Aboriginal Health Workers experience multilevel barriers to quitting smoking that include personal, social, cultural and environmental factors. Multidimensional smoking cessation programs are needed that reduce the stress and burden for Aboriginal Health Workers; provide access to culturally relevant quitting resources; and address the prevailing normalisation of smoking in the family, workplace and community.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22621767 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal hunting buffers climate-driven fire-size variability in Australia's spinifex grasslands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123525
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 26;109(26):10287-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2012
Author
Rebecca Bliege Bird
Brian F Codding
Peter G Kauhanen
Douglas W Bird
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. rbird@stanford.edu
Source
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Jun 26;109(26):10287-92
Date
Jun-26-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Ecosystem
Humans
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Poaceae
Abstract
Across diverse ecosystems, greater climatic variability tends to increase wildfire size, particularly in Australia, where alternating wet-dry cycles increase vegetation growth, only to leave a dry overgrown landscape highly susceptible to fire spread. Aboriginal Australian hunting fires have been hypothesized to buffer such variability, mitigating mortality on small-mammal populations, which have suffered declines and extinctions in the arid zone coincident with Aboriginal depopulation. We test the hypothesis that the relationship between climate and fire size is buffered through the maintenance of an anthropogenic, fine-grained fire regime by comparing the effect of climatic variability on landscapes dominated by Martu Aboriginal hunting fires with those dominated by lightning fires. We show that Aboriginal fires are smaller, more tightly clustered, and remain small even when climate variation causes huge fires in the lightning region. As these effects likely benefit threatened small-mammal species, Aboriginal hunters should be considered trophic facilitators, and policies aimed at reducing the risk of large fires should promote land-management strategies consistent with Aboriginal burning regimes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22689979 View in PubMed
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477 records – page 1 of 48.