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501 records – page 1 of 51.

A 6-month follow-up study of 1048 patients diagnosed with an occupational skin disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147641
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Tarja Mälkönen
Riitta Jolanki
Kristiina Alanko
Ritva Luukkonen
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Antti Lauerma
Päivikki Susitaival
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Control of Hypersensitivity Diseases and Services for Statistics, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2009 Nov;61(5):261-8
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Industry
Hand Dermatoses - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Patch Tests
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Urticaria - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Occupational skin diseases (OSDs) often have considerable medical and occupational consequences. Previous data on prognostic factors have been derived from studies with fairly small sample sizes.
To determine the medical and occupational outcome in 1048 patients diagnosed with OSD at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and to identify the prognostic risk factors for the continuation of OSD.
Patients examined in 1994-2001 filled out a follow-up questionnaire 6 months after the diagnosis. Data on atopy, contact allergies, and occupation were analysed.
Six months after the diagnosis the skin disease had healed in 27% of the patients. The OSD had cleared up in 17% of those with no changes at work, and in 34% of those who had changed their job/occupation. The best clearing had occurred in the patients with contact urticaria (35%), whereas the healing of allergic (27%) and irritant (23%) contact dermatitis was similar. The risk factors for continuing occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were no changes in work, age > 45 years, food-related occupations, respiratory atopy, and male sex.
The healing of OSD was associated with discontinuation of the causative exposure. A change in work and the presence of easily avoidable work-related allergies were associated with a good prognosis.
PubMed ID
19878240 View in PubMed
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12-year data on skin diseases in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases II: Risk occupations with special reference to allergic contact dermatitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311035
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):343-349
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2020
Author
Kristiina Aalto-Korte
Kirsi Koskela
Maria Pesonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH), Occupational Health Unit, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2020 Jun; 82(6):343-349
Date
Jun-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Acrylates - adverse effects
Barbering - statistics & numerical data
Construction Industry - statistics & numerical data
Cooking - statistics & numerical data
Dental Technicians - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Irritant - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology - etiology
Epoxy Compounds - adverse effects
Farmers - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Housekeeping - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Manufacturing Industry - statistics & numerical data
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Abstract
Detailed epidemiological studies on occupational skin diseases (OSDs) are scarce.
To analyze risk occupations for OSDs in the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD).
We retrieved numbers of OSD cases (excluding skin infections) for different occupations from the FROD in 2005-2016. In the FROD, Finnish ISCO-08-based classification of occupations was used since 2011, and the preceding ISCO-88-based version until 2010. We combined cases from the earlier and the later period using conversion tables provided by Statistics Finland. We included occupations with at least five cases and analyzed them in detail. We calculated incidence rates for OSDs and separately for allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in different risk occupations using national labor force statistics. We also studied causes of ACD in these occupations.
Risk occupations with the largest number of OSD cases included farmers, hairdressers, assistant nurses, cooks, cleaners, machinists, and nurses. Occupations with the highest incidences of OSDs comprised spray painters (23.8/10?000 person years), bakers (20.4), and dental technicians (19.0). Epoxy compounds and acrylates were prominent causes of ACD in occupations with the highest incidences of ACD.
Uniform use of International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO) would facilitate comparisons of OSD figures in different countries.
PubMed ID
32144776 View in PubMed
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Absence attributed to incapacity and occupational disease/accidents among female and male workers in the fish-processing industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203445
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 Jul;48(5):289-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1998
Author
B. Pålsson
U. Strömberg
K. Ohlsson
S. Skerfving
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 Jul;48(5):289-95
Date
Jul-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Female
Fishes
Food-Processing Industry
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Sick-leave between 1984 and 1989 was higher among both female (n = 515) and male (n = 304) fish-processing workers [observed/expected (O/E) 2.24 and 1.69, respectively] than among non-exposed groups (0.62 and 0.89). Diagnoses in the musculoskeletal system dominated (i.e., neck/upper limbs; females, exposed vs. non-exposed workers: 30 vs. 12%; males: 11 vs. 5.8%). In subjects who left employment, the O/E-ratio decreased (females: 3.02 vs. 1.55; males: 2.40 vs. 1.55). Among those women hired before the start of the observation period, exposed subjects had higher frequencies of sick-leave than non-exposed, for both total illness and musculoskeletal diagnoses. In the men, there were corresponding differences, though not fully statistically significant. Reported occupational diseases [O/E: females: 4.5; (95% confidence interval) CI = 3.2-6.1; males: 2.3; CI = 1.3-3.9] and accidents (females: 4.3; CI = 3.0-5.9; males: 1.8; CI = 1.2-2.7) were also higher in female than in male fish-processing workers, and much higher than in non-exposed workers. In conclusion, work in the fish-processing industry was associated with increased frequencies of sick-leave, especially because of diagnoses of the musculoskeletal system, and occupational disorders and accidents, in particular among female workers.
PubMed ID
9876411 View in PubMed
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Absence from work due to occupational and non-occupational accidents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118455
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Feb;41(1):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Kirsten Jørgensen
Bjarne Laursen
Author Affiliation
Department of Management Engineering, The Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark. kirj@man.dtu.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Feb;41(1):18-24
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate absence from work in Denmark due to occupational and non-occupational accidents.
Since the beginning of the last decade, political focus has been placed on the population's working capacity and the scope of absence due to illness. Absence from work is estimated at between 3% and 6% of working hours in the EU and costs are estimated at approximately 2.5% of GNP.
Victims of accidents treated at two emergency departments were interviewed regarding absence for the injured, the family and others. All answers were linked to the hospital information on the injury, so that it was possible to examine the relation between absence and injury type, and cause of the accident.
In total, 1,479 injured persons were interviewed. 36% of these reported absence from work by themselves or others. In mean, an injury caused 3.21 days of absence. Based on this the total absence due to injuries in Denmark was estimated to 1,822,000 workdays, corresponding to approximately 6% of the total absence from work due to all types of illness. Non-occupational injuries resulted in more absence than did occupational injuries.
Absence due to accidents contributed to a considerable part of the total absence from work, and non-occupational accidents caused more absence than did occupational accidents.
PubMed ID
23208299 View in PubMed
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Absences for sickness among children in day care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36550
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Nov;81(11):929-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1992
Author
M. Möttönen
M. Uhari
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1992 Nov;81(11):929-32
Date
Nov-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Child
Child Day Care Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Finland - epidemiology
Food Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hygiene
Infant
Morbidity
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Parents
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Social Class
Abstract
The number of days of absence because of sickness, recorded for all children in one city in Finland, cared for in municipal day care over a period of 2.5 years, was collected from the monthly figures kept by the city council office for accounting purposes. The average number of days of absence per child was 24 per year at child-care centers and 9 in family care (p
PubMed ID
1467617 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abuse of and dependence on alcohol in Swedish women: role of education, occupation and family structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10814
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
K L Thundal
P. Allebeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University, Sweden. Kajsa-Lena.Thundal@socmed.gu.se
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 1998 Sep;33(9):445-50
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - epidemiology - psychology
Demography
Divorce
Educational Status
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Marriage
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The present study, which is part of a multipurpose study on alcohol use among women, focuses on the association between education, occupation, family structure and development of alcohol dependence or abuse in women. A total of 316 women were selected by stratified random sampling from all women in a defined part of Gothenburg, Sweden. In a face to face interview, questions were asked about occupation, education, family structure and other variables reflecting socioeconomic conditions and relations within the family. As outcome measures we used alcohol dependence and abuse (ADA), diagnosed in a clinical interview according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition-Revised (DSM-III-R). We found that never having been married, or having poor communication with the spouse, as well as having no children at home to take care of, were strongly associated with ADA in women. The role of social class depended on whether education or occupation was used as a measure. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that development of alcohol-related problems among women to a large extent is influenced by matters that relate to home and private life.
PubMed ID
9766171 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accident process preceding overexertion back injuries in nursing personnel. PROSA study group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203517
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Oct;24(5):367-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
I L Engkvist
M. Hagberg
E W Hjelm
E. Menckel
L. Ekenvall
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Working Life, Solna, Sweden. ingalill@niwl.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Oct;24(5):367-75
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Back Injuries - etiology
Cluster analysis
Female
Humans
Lifting - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing
Patient transfer
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
This prospective dynamic-population-based study investigated factors involved in the accident process preceding overexertion back injuries among nursing personnel.
The study covered all reported occupational overexertion back injuries due to accidents among of the approximately 24 500 nurses in the Stockholm County hospitals during 1 year. It was assumed that several factors interact in the accident process. Detailed information was obtained for each injury by interviews with the injured nurse and head nurse. Risks in the physical environment were identified using an ergonomic checklist.
During the study 136 overexertion back injuries were reported. Of the 130 nurses participating in the study, 125 had been injured in connection with patient work. Cluster analysis yielded 6 clusters and their pattern of contributing factors. The most frequent injury occurred during patient transfer in the bed or to or from the bed, without the use of transfer devices, when the patient suddenly lost his or her balance or resisted during the transfer and the nurse had to make a sudden movement. However, there were physical conditions, such as shortcomings in the physical work environment or a lack of a transfer device, that compelled the nurses to perform the tasks under unsafe conditions.
The clusters showed a complexity of different kinds of accidents and indicated that the measures for preventing accidents, or for blocking an accident process once started, have to be of different kinds and placed at several different levels in the organization of a workplace.
PubMed ID
9869308 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Accidents among the Norwegian population. Interview by Marit Fonn].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229074
Source
J Sykepleien. 1990 May 10;78(8):16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-1990

501 records – page 1 of 51.