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Abdominal symptoms among sewage workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10795
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Friis
L. Agréus
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Lennart.Friis@arbmed.uas.se
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sanitary Engineering
Sewage
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal symptoms and the abdominal medical history among sewage workers. 142 male sewage workers and 137 male referents in 11 Swedish municipalities were addressed with a questionnaire about abdominal symptoms, medical history, occupational history and life style factors. The sewage workers suffered less from nausea [adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) = 0.18, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.04-0.84] than the referents. There was no significant difference in the three months prevalence of diarrhoea (adjOR = 1.7, 95% Cl = 0.79-3.4), dyspepsia (adjOR = 0.85, 95% Cl = 0.49-1.5) or irritable bowel syndrome (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.53-3.5). The sewage workers were affected more often by peptic ulcers during their present jobs than the referents, although the increased risk was not significant (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.31-6.1). The odds ratios were adjusted for age, use of tobacco products and alcohol consumption. The conclusion of this study was that sewage workers are less affected by nausea than comparable referents.
PubMed ID
9800423 View in PubMed
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[About life, work and health problems of fishermen employed by PPP and H "Dalmor" SA., fishing at the Sea of Okhotsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216598
Source
Med Pr. 1995;46(3):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

[Acute lumbago prevalence of health workers exposed to a moderate level of exposure index MAPO]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85660
Source
G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2007 Jul-Sep;29(3 Suppl):572-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mazzotta M.
D'Ettorre G.
Cazzato R G
De Giorgio N.
Author Affiliation
ASL Brindisi - U.O. Medicina del Lavoro, Servizio Prevenzione e Protezione.
Source
G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2007 Jul-Sep;29(3 Suppl):572-3
Language
Italian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prevalence
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
We conduced a cross sectional study in the period Gen - Dec 2006 to examine the relationship between acute lumbago in health workers and exposition to a moderate level of exposure index Movement and Assistance of Hospital Patients (MAPO). The study ruled 240 health workers (M: 180; F: 60), the mean age was 44,9 years (range 24 - 64); was evaluated the occurrence of acute lumbago in the last 12 months. The objective of this study was to describe the trends over a specific time of the association between the moderate MAPO index and acute lumbago in this sample of health care workers. The results indicate that healthcare workers exposed to moderate MAPO index appear to incur a greater risk of acute lumbago than general population, but lower than that evidenced by Italian and Sweden authors between nursing staffs. Medical surveillance of exposed workers is confirmed as necessary method of secondary prevention and also it is useful in the diagnosis of worker's susceptibilities.
PubMed ID
18409839 View in PubMed
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[Acute pneumonias in those working with chemical substances that irritate the respiratory tract].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227343
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(11):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
N V Vladyko
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(11):13-5
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Acute Disease
Chi-Square Distribution
Humans
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory System - drug effects
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A study was performed of acute pneumonia (AP) morbidity among the workers exposed to respiratory irritation inducing chemical substances, which revealed a marked AP prevalence in these professional groups. A qualitative analysis of the AP cases severity helped to establish some peculiarities of the disease course in workers exposed to minor concentrations of the chemical substances, which should be taken into account in diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and out-patient observation.
PubMed ID
1839789 View in PubMed
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Adverse health reactions in skin, eyes, and respiratory tract among dental personnel in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15729
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Latex
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Permeability
Polymers - adverse effects - chemistry
Prevalence
Resins, Synthetic - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Compounds
Volatilization
Abstract
Dental personnel manually handle products that contain monomers. Several studies have documented adverse health effects after exposure to such products. Gloves made of vinyl or latex are easily penetrated by monomers. Ordinary glasses, or visors, do not protect against vapour from polymer products. Dental face masks filter out about 40% of respirable particles. To survey the prevalence of asthma, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, hay fever/rhinitis, and hand eczema among dental personnel, a questionnaire was distributed to all dental teams in Northern Sweden. Referents were researchers, teachers, and secretaries from the same geographical area. The response rate was 76% for dental teams, and 66% for referents. The results show a significantly higher prevalence of conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis among dentists, both male and female. Hypersensitivity to dental materials was reported by significantly more dental personnel than by referents.
PubMed ID
9646391 View in PubMed
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Agents causing occupational asthma in Finland in 1986-2002: cow epithelium bypassed by moulds from moisture-damaged buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171311
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Dec;35(12):1632-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
R. Piipari
H. Keskinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. Ritva.Piipari@ttl.fi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Dec;35(12):1632-7
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Animals
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology - microbiology
Cattle
Environmental Pollutants
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fungi
Humans
Humidity
Irritants - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - microbiology
Occupations
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Workplace
Abstract
Occupational asthma is an avoidable form of asthma. In Finland, the diagnosis of occupational asthma entitles substantial compensation to the employee. The diagnostics are based on symptoms, exposure assessment, allergologic investigations, follow-up of peak expiratory flow (PEF) at work and at home and, in many cases, specific challenge tests.
To study the causative agents of occupational asthma in Finland.
The causative agents and the numbers of new occupational asthma cases notified to the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD) during 1986-2002 are reported.
The number of occupational asthma cases increased from 1986 until 1995, after which a downward trend, stabilizing during the last few years, has been observed. The majority of the cases (59%) in the beginning of the period (1986-1990) were associated with agriculture, but the percentage has fallen thereafter (42% of the cases in 1998-2002) along with the fall in the total number of cases. Since 1995, indoor moulds from water-damaged buildings have caused an increasing number of cases and have become the most important causative agents (0.5% cases, in 1986-1990 and 18% of the cases in 1998-2002). Chemicals have caused 10-30% of the cases, a decreasing number since 1990. The most important chemicals causing occupational asthma have been diisocyanates and welding fumes, followed by hairdressing chemicals and formaldehyde.
The number of occupational asthma cases in Finland reached its height in the mid-1990s. The decrease in the number of total cases is because of the decrease in agriculture-associated cases, reflecting the number of employees in agriculture-associated occupations, which has greatly decreased since Finland joined the EU in 1995. An epidemic of mould-induced asthma, affecting mostly white-collar employees working in moisture-damaged buildings, has taken place since 1995.
PubMed ID
16393330 View in PubMed
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Airborne occupational exposure, ABO phenotype and risk of ischaemic heart disease in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53657
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, H:S Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg Bakke 23, Denmark. ps11@bbh.ohsp.dk
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):191-8
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - genetics
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Phenotype
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that long-term occupational exposure to airborne pollutants is a stronger risk factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in men with blood type O than in men with other ABO phenotypes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional and prospective study taking into account potential confounders. SETTING: The Copenhagen Male Study. SUBJECTS: 3321 men aged 53-74 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Lifetime prevalence of myocardial infarction and incidence of IHD in an 8-year follow-up among men without overt cardiovascular disease. RESULTS: Among men with phenotypes other than O no association was found between airborne pollutant exposure and IHD risk. Among men with blood type O (P = 1417, 42%), 4.7% had a history of myocardial infarction, as compared with 5.7% among men with other phenotypes (P = 1904, 58%). Long-term occupational exposure (> 5 years of exposure) to various airborne pollutants: soldering fumes, welding fumes and plastic fumes was associated with a significantly increased lifetime prevalence of myocardial infarction. Odds ratios (95% confidence limits) for these factors were 3.0 (1.6-5.8), P = 0.002, 2.1 (1.05-4.2), P = 0.05, and 8.3 (2.6-27.0), P = 0.003. In an 8-year follow-up a similar though weaker association was found with a significantly increased risk for those exposed long term to soldering fumes: 1.8 (1.0-3.2), P = 0.05. CONCLUSION: The finding of a quite strong interplay between airborne pollutants, ABO phenotypes, and risk of IHD, may open up new possibilities for clarifying the roles of the ABO blood group and air pollution as cardiovascular risk factors.
Notes
Comment In: J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):179-8212394325
PubMed ID
12394327 View in PubMed
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Airborne occupational exposure, ABO phenotype, and risk of obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53175
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jun;29(6):689-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
P. Suadicani
H O Hein
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
The Copenhagen Male Study, Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, NV, Denmark. PS11@bbh.hosp.dk
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2005 Jun;29(6):689-96
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System
Aged
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - chemically induced
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Health Surveys
Humans
Industry
Inflammation Mediators - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - blood - chemically induced - etiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We have previously found a quite strong interplay between occupational airborne pollutants, ABO phenotypes, and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), with long-term exposure being associated with a significantly increased risk among men with phenotype O, and not among men with other ABO phenotypes. We suggested that the biological pathway could be a stronger systemic inflammatory response in men with blood group O. Several inflammatory mediators likely to increase the risk of IHD have recently been linked also to obesity, suggesting that long-term exposure to airborne pollutants might play a role in the aetiology of obesity. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that long-term occupational exposure to airborne pollutants would be more strongly associated with obesity in men with phenotype O than in men with other ABO phenotypes. DESIGN: Cross-sectional exposure-response study taking into account potential confounders. SETTING: The Copenhagen Male Study. SUBJECTS: A total of 3290 men aged 53-74 y. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Prevalence of obesity (BMI > or =30 (kg/m2)). RESULTS: Overall, no differences were found in the prevalence of obesity between men with the O phenotype (n=1399) and men with other phenotypes (n=1891), 8.6 and 9.0%. However, only among men with the O phenotype was long-term occupational exposure (at least 5 y of frequent exposure) to various respirable airborne pollutants: dust, asbestos, soldering fumes, welding fumes, organic solvents, fumes from lacquer, paint or varnish, toxic components, breath irritants, stench or strongly smelling products, and irritants (other than breath irritants or contagious components) associated with an increased prevalence of obesity. Statistically, the strongest univariate associations were found for asbestos exposure, welding fumes, and breath irritants. Odds ratios (95% confidence limits) for these factors were 3.7 (1.8-7.6), 2.7 (1.6-4.4), and 2.6 (1.5-4.4), respectively. This particular relationship of airborne exposures with obesity in men with phenotype O was supported in multivariate analysis including interaction terms and taking into account a number of potential confounders. In contrast, no gene-environment interactions with obesity were found with respect to ABO phenotypes and a number of nonrespirable exposures. CONCLUSION: The finding of a quite strong interplay between long-term exposure to airborne pollutants, ABO phenotypes, and risk of obesity may open up new possibilities for clarifying mechanisms underlying the global obesity epidemic.
PubMed ID
15809661 View in PubMed
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760 records – page 1 of 76.