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[Activities of the Health Center providing health care for Nuclear Power Station workers and for nearby residents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186597
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(12):31-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
N A Kuralesin
Ia E L'vovich
G N Roldugin
O N Choporov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2002;(12):31-4
Date
2002
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth rate
Child
Community Health Services
Female
Health status
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Occupational Health Services
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Russia
Abstract
The authors evaluate relationships of parameters describing activities of Health center and selected according to "discrete correlation galaxies" method with characteristics of health state of population covered by the center. The article contains mathematic models that could be a basis for forecasting changes of health state characteristics under variation of Health center activity parameters.
PubMed ID
12593153 View in PubMed
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Actual medical and ergonomic problems in agriculture in the Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54944
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 1994;7(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
Y I Kundiev
Author Affiliation
Institute for Occupational Health, Kiev, The Ukraine.
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 1994;7(1):3-11
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Female
Human Engineering
Humans
Occupational Health
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Ukraine
Abstract
A new agrarian policy in a number of countries caused the necessity to introduce additional measures aimed at preventing of agricultural workers' health. The epidemiological studies in the Ukraine revealed the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (ischemic heart disease, arterial hypertension) particularly among operators of agricultural machines and workers being in contact with pesticides. The state of health of women working in greenhouses and those in sugar beet growing is assessed. The rate of spontaneous abortions and other pregnancy disorders as well as the retardation in physical development of newborns and infants are evaluated. The necessity to improve the ergonomy of agricultural machines, to increase their quality and reliability is emphasized. The search of physiological optimum of efforts to steering wheel and pedals is given as an example. This approach is of general significance and can be applied to road-building machines as well. The role of pesticide management in the Ukraine is also considered in this paper. The damage to human health and the environment is most often connected with violations of regulations, or persistent usage of highly toxic substances. The most urgent tasks are the revision of the registered and applied pesticides, development of new ecological and hygienic standards, improvement of biomonitoring methods and efficiency of the state sanitary supervision.
PubMed ID
7921900 View in PubMed
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Adolescent marriage and childbearing: the long-term economic outcome, Canada in the 1980s.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233693
Source
Adolescence. 1988;23(89):45-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
C F Grindstaff
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Adolescence. 1988;23(89):45-58
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Economics
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Humans
Income
Marriage
Maternal Age
Occupations
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in adolescence
Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to examine the long-term economic outcomes (education, labor force participation, occupation, and income) associated with female adolescent marriage and childbearing. The 1981 Canadian census is the data source for all women in Canada at age 30, controlling for age at marriage and at first birth. The data suggest that women at age 30 in Canada are in the best economic circumstances when they remain single or when they marry at age 20 or older and either remain childless or begin their childbearing at age 25 or older. The implications of these findings are discussed.
PubMed ID
3381686 View in PubMed
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Adverse reproduction outcomes among employees working in biomedical research laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58543
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
Helena Wennborg
Jens Peter Bonde
Magnus Stenbeck
Jørn Olsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences, Novum Research Park, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden. helena.wennborg@biosci.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2002 Feb;28(1):5-11
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities - epidemiology - etiology
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Laboratory Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Obstetric Labor, Premature - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Pregnancy
Reference Values
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate reproductive outcomes such as birthweight, preterm births, and postterrm births among women working in research laboratories while pregnant. METHODS: Female university personnel were identified from a source cohort of Swedish laboratory employees, and the database was linked to the medical birth register. The first births of the women were included in the analysis, 249 pregnancies among the women with laboratory work and 613 pregnancies among the women without laboratory tasks. Information about exposure to various laboratory agents was obtained from a previous questionnaire investigation at the research group level according to a specific definition. The ponderal index and ratio between observed and expected birthweights were calculated. Logistic regression models were used for analyses of dichotomous outcomes (preterm, postterrm and birthweight). RESULTS: Exposure to laboratory work with solvents was associated with an increased risk of preterm births, the estimated odds ratio (OR) being 3.4 (1.0
PubMed ID
11871853 View in PubMed
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Agricultural work during pregnancy and selected structural malformations in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216320
Source
Epidemiology. 1995 Jan;6(1):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
T. Nurminen
K. Rantala
K. Kurppa
P C Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki.
Source
Epidemiology. 1995 Jan;6(1):23-30
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Agriculture
Case-Control Studies
Central Nervous System - abnormalities
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure
Mouth Abnormalities - epidemiology
Musculoskeletal Abnormalities
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
We studied the relation between birth defects and maternal agricultural work in a nationwide time- and area-matched case-referent series of 1,306 pairs of infants (581 orofacial clefts, 365 central nervous system defects, 360 skeletal defects) obtained through the Finnish Register of Congenital Malformations. We supplemented the Register data, including the mothers' latest and previous pregnancies, diseases, consumption of drugs and alcohol, smoking habits, and the like, with detailed interviews on the mothers' work conditions. When all of the birth defects were pooled and agricultural work was compared with nonagricultural work in the first trimester of pregnancy, the adjusted odds ratio was 1.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.9-2.0]. For orofacial clefts, the corresponding odds ratio was 1.9 (95% CI = 1.1-3.5). An industrial hygienist's blinded assessment indicated that seven mothers of infants with orofacial clefts and three reference mothers had been exposed to pesticides in agricultural work; the adjusted odds ratio for work with pesticide exposure, when compared with unexposed agricultural work, was 1.9 (95% CI = 0.4-8.3). Exposure to solvents did not explain the observed association.
Notes
Comment In: Epidemiology. 1995 Jan;6(1):6-77888447
PubMed ID
7888440 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution exposure, residential mobility and term birth weight in Oslo, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97716
Source
Environ Res. 2010 May;110(4):363-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Christian Madsen
Ulrike Gehring
Sam Erik Walker
Bert Brunekreef
Hein Stigum
Oyvind Naess
Per Nafstad
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, P.O. Box 4404, Nydalen, NO-0403 Oslo, Norway. christian.madsen@fhi.no
Source
Environ Res. 2010 May;110(4):363-71
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Movements
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Birth weight
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Kinetics
Male
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - analysis
Pregnancy
Term Birth
Young Adult
Abstract
Environmental exposure during pregnancy may have lifelong health consequences for the offspring and some studies have association between maternal exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and offspring's birth weight. However, many of these studies do not take into account small-scale variations in exposure, residential mobility, and work addresses during pregnancy. We used information from the National Birth Registry of Norway to examine associations between ambient environmental exposure such as air pollution and temperature, and offspring's birth weight taking advantage of information on migration history and work address in a large population-based cohort. A dispersion model was used to estimate ambient air pollution levels at all residential addresses and work addresses for a total of 25,229 pregnancies between 1999 and 2002 in Oslo, Norway. Ambient exposure to traffic pollution for the entire pregnancy was associated with a reduction in term birth weight in crude analyzes when comparing children of the highest and lowest exposed mothers. No evidence for an association between exposure to traffic pollution at home and work addresses and term birth weight after adjustment for covariates known to influence birth weight during pregnancy. After stratification, small statistically non-significant reductions were present but only for multiparious mothers. This group also had less residential mobility and less employment during pregnancy. The overall findings suggest no clear association between term birth weight and traffic pollution exposure during pregnancy. However, mobility patterns could introduce possible confounding when examining small-scale variations in exposure by using addresses. This could be of importance in future studies.
PubMed ID
20227069 View in PubMed
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An exploratory analysis of the effect of pesticide exposure on the risk of spontaneous abortion in an Ontario farm population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193201
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Aug;109(8):851-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
T E Arbuckle
Z. Lin
L S Mery
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Reproductive and Child Health, Population and Public Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Tye_Arbuckle@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Aug;109(8):851-7
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - chemically induced - epidemiology
Acetates - adverse effects
Adult
Age Factors
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Fathers
Female
Fungicides, Industrial - adverse effects
Gestational Age
Herbicides - adverse effects
Humans
Insecticides - adverse effects
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Organophosphorus Compounds
Pesticides - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Rural Population
Thiocarbamates - adverse effects
Time Factors
Triazines
Abstract
The toxicity of pesticides on human reproduction is largely unknown--particularly how mixtures of pesticide products might affect fetal toxicity. The Ontario Farm Family Health Study collected data by questionnaire on the identity and timing of pesticide use on the farm, lifestyle factors, and a complete reproductive history from the farm operator and eligible couples living on the farm. A total of 2,110 women provided information on 3,936 pregnancies, including 395 spontaneous abortions. To explore critical windows of exposure and target sites for toxicity, we examined exposures separately for preconception (3 months before and up to month of conception) and postconception (first trimester) windows and for early ( 34 years of age) was the strongest risk factor for spontaneous abortions, and we observed several interactions between pesticides in the older age group using Classification and Regression Tree analysis. This study shows that timing of exposure and restricting analyses to more homogeneous endpoints are important in characterizing the reproductive toxicity of pesticides.
Notes
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PubMed ID
11564623 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antineoplastic drugs and spontaneous abortion in nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237145
Source
N Engl J Med. 1986 Apr 17;314(16):1048-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-17-1986

443 records – page 1 of 45.