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[4 with various experiences and expectations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235089
Source
Sykepleien. 1987 Jun 5;74(10):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-5-1987

Ability to solve problems, professionalism, management, empathy, and working capacity in occupational therapy--the professional self description form.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73247
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
M T Gullberg
H M Olsson
G. Alenfelt
A B Ivarsson
M. Nilsson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):173-8
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Empathy
Female
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Problem Solving
Professional Competence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Abstract
The majority of occupational therapists in Sweden previously worked on large occupational therapy wards. Health care policy has changed over the years and the system has been reorganized accordingly. The employment situation for occupational therapists has also changed. This paper focuses on the perception of professional self among occupational therapists. The objective was to explore the professional self and to suggest components important to the occupational therapist profession. The Professional Self Description Form (PSDF) was used for the exploration of self. The 19 items in the PSDF cover areas relevant to professional functioning and activity. Sixty-eight employed occupational therapists participated. The results of the PSDF were subjected to factor analysis and five factors were obtained; Ability to solve problems, Professionalism, Management, Empathy, and Working capacity. We believe that these five factors can function as improving domains of the role of the professional occupational therapist in Sweden.
PubMed ID
7724926 View in PubMed
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Academic performance and job satisfaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244652
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1981 Apr;48(2):83-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
B W Posthuma
A R Willan
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1981 Apr;48(2):83-6
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Occupational Therapy - psychology
Ontario
Questionnaires
Abstract
This paper investigates the possible relationship between job satisfaction and academic performance of occupational therapists who have graduated from the University of Western Ontario in the years 1975 to 1978. Fifty-four percent of the graduates of this time period filled out questionnaires eliciting information on their satisfaction with their jobs as occupational therapists and with the profession of occupational therapy. This information was analyzed with the therapists' academic performance of Grade XIII and their four years in the Occupational Therapy Program. The results indicated that although job satisfaction related significantly to three individual academic courses it did not relate to overall performance as measured by grade average.
PubMed ID
10250903 View in PubMed
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Access and perceived need for physical and occupational therapy in chronic arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144640
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(22):1827-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Debbie Ehrmann Feldman
Sasha Bernatsky
Jean Frédéric Lévesque
My Tram Van
Michelle Houde
Karine Toupin April
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Ecole de Réadaptation, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Pavillon 7077 du Parc, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3C3J7. debbie.feldman@umontreal.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2010;32(22):1827-32
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - rehabilitation
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chronic Disease - rehabilitation
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Odds Ratio
Physical Therapy Modalities
Physicians, Family
Quebec
Referral and Consultation
Rheumatology
Abstract
Physical and occupational therapy are beneficial for persons with chronic arthritis; however, access is problematic. The goal was to examine issues related to access to these services for patients with chronic arthritis.
We used two data sources: 1) questionnaires sent to a random sample of 600 family physicians and to all 85 rheumatologists in the province of Quebec; and 2) interviews of 211 patients with physician-confirmed chronic arthritis recruited from 34 primary care settings in Quebec.
Only 11.5% of family physicians and 31.7% of rheumatologists referred patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to rehabilitation, whereas 60.4% of family doctors referred patients with osteoarthritis. Only 26.1% of patients felt that they required rehabilitation and this was associated with lower self-efficacy (OR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72, 0.99) and higher educational level (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.36).
Family physicians are less likely to refer patients with RA to therapy. Only about a quarter of patients with chronic arthritis treated in primary care perceived the need for these services. Efforts to improve arthritis care should address education of physicians and patients regarding the benefits of rehabilitation and there should be efforts to increase therapy resources in order to enhance access.
PubMed ID
20345251 View in PubMed
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Accommodation needs and student-environment fit in upper secondary schools for students with severe physical disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197755
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Jun;67(3):162-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
H. Hemmingsson
L. Borell
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Institution of Clinical Neuroscience, Occupational Therapy and Elderly Care Research, Stockholm, Sweden. Helena.Hemmingsson@neurotec.ki.se
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Jun;67(3):162-72
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Needs Assessment
Occupational therapy
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to identify, from the personal perspective of students with disability, their needs for physical and social accommodations in upper secondary schools specially adapted for students with severe physical disabilities. The study also aimed to identify those areas of student-environment fit which were most often achieved. Forty-eight students in four schools in Sweden were assessed by occupational therapists using the School Setting Interview. Forty-seven students reported needs for accommodations in the school setting. The study indicates that schools generally were able to meet the students' accommodation needs in the physical environment. The schools also met students' accommodation needs for field trips, sport activities and assistance. Student-environment fit in occupations requiring reading, remembering and speaking was unsatisfactory. Accommodations on a general, group and individual level are highlighted and discussed. The study recommends that occupational therapists become more involved and offer society their expertise in barrier removal to a greater extent.
PubMed ID
10914479 View in PubMed
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Activity-based assessment (BIA)--inter-rater reliability and staff experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161401
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2008 Jun;15(2):75-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Lars Kjellin
Rosmarie Cizinsky Sjödahl
Mona Eklund
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Research Centre and Department of Clinical Medicine, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. lars.kjellin@orebroll.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2008 Jun;15(2):75-81
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Attitude of Health Personnel
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Observer Variation
Occupational Therapy - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
The BIA method, based on assessment of patients in activities, was developed to enable reliable assessment of clients' occupational functioning. The method evaluates the patient's ego functions and capacity for activity and participation. The aims of this study were to examine inter-rater reliability for the BIA method and to compare the experiences of staff working with the BIA with those of staff using standard assessment (SA). In SA, the patient's activity problems and capacities were assessed without using any structured protocol. Four staff members worked according to the BIA method and eight according to SA. The estimation of reliability was based on data from 14 patients who went through the BIA and were assessed by five staff members. These assessments resulted in all in about 400 statements, which were classified and compared for agreement between raters. In order to address the aim concerning staff experiences, a questionnaire was filled out anonymously by the staff. The inter-rater reliability of the nine ego functions varied from 0.76 to 1.00. The scale was deemed appropriate by the BIA staff and they had significantly higher median ratings on work satisfaction and appropriateness than the SA staff. In conclusion, the inter-rater reliability of the BIA was found to be good. The BIA method also seems to have a high degree of appropriateness, constituting a promising assessment tool when occupational functioning is addressed.
PubMed ID
17852959 View in PubMed
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Activity programs in personl care homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110912
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1968;35(3):98-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Author
M. Herman
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1968;35(3):98-100
Date
1968
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Humans
Manitoba
Nursing Homes
Occupational therapy
Rehabilitation
PubMed ID
5188469 View in PubMed
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Actual vs best practice for families post-stroke according to three rehabilitation disciplines.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161684
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Annie Rochette
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Johanne Desrosiers
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Quebec, Canada. annie.rochette@umontreal.ca
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2007 Sep;39(7):513-9
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Health Services
Cost of Illness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Physical Therapy Modalities
Questionnaires
Speech Therapy
Spouses - psychology
Stroke - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
To investigate occupational therapists', physiotherapists' and speech language pathologists' family-related rehabilitation practice post-stroke and its association with clinician and environmental variables.
A Canadian cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted on 1755 clinicians. Three case studies describing typical patients after stroke receiving acute care, in-patient rehabilitation, or community rehabilitation, and including specific descriptors regarding family stress and concern, were used to elicit information on patient management.
One-third of the sample identified a family-related problem and offered a related intervention, but only 12/1755 clinicians indicated that they would typically use a standardized assessment of family functioning. Working in the community out-patient setting was associated (OR 9.16), whereas working in a rehabilitation in-patient setting was negatively associated (OR 0.58) with being a problem identifier, the reference group being acute care. Being a PT (OR 0.53) or an SLP (OR 0.49) vs an OT was negatively associated with being a problem identifier, whereas being older (OR 1.02 ) or working in Ontario (OR 1.58) was associated with being a problem identifier. To work in a community out-patient setting (OR 2.43), being older clinicians (OR 1.02) or not perceiving their work environment being supportive of an on-going professional learning (OR 1.72) was associated with being an intervention user,whereas being a PT (OR 0.50) was negatively associated with being a user.
For these 3 disciplines, the prevalence of a family-related focus is low post-stroke. Given the increasing evidence regarding the effectiveness of family-related interventions on stroke outcomes, it is imperative that best practice is implemented.
PubMed ID
17724549 View in PubMed
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Actual vs. best practices for young children with cerebral palsy: a survey of paediatric occupational therapists and physical therapists in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160768
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2008 Jan-Mar;11(1):60-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
M N Saleh
N. Korner-Bitensky
L. Snider
F. Malouin
B. Mazer
E. Kennedy
M A Roy
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University and Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. maysoun.saleh@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2008 Jan-Mar;11(1):60-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Cerebral Palsy - rehabilitation
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Interviews as Topic
Male
Occupational Therapy - standards
Pediatrics - standards
Physical Therapy Modalities - standards
Quality of Health Care
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cerebral palsy (CP) constitutes a substantial portion of paediatric rehabilitation, yet little is known regarding actual occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) practices. This study describes OT and PT practices for young children with CP in Quebec, Canada.
This was a cross-sectional survey. All eligible, consenting paediatric occupational therapists (OTs) and physical therapists (PTs) were interviewed using a structured telephone interview based on vignettes of two typical children with CP at two age points--18 months and 4 years. Reported practices were grouped according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).
91.9% of PTs (n=62; 83.8% participation rate) and 67.1% of OTs (n=85; 91.4% participation rate) reported using at least one standardized paediatric assessment. OT and PT interventions focused primarily on impairments and primary function (such as gait function and activities of daily living). Both professions gave little attention to interventions related to play and recreation/leisure. Clinicians reported the need for more training and education specific to CP and to the use of research findings in clinical practice.
Wide variations and gaps were identified in clinicians' responses suggesting the need for a basic standard of OT and PT management as well as strategies to encourage knowledge dissemination regarding current best practice.
PubMed ID
17943507 View in PubMed
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564 records – page 1 of 57.