Skip header and navigation

Refine By

112 records – page 1 of 12.

[Analysis of main functional parameters of the national system for mandatory social insurance against workmen's occupational risks].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183050
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(9):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
I G Baranovskii
O V Izmailova
V V Subbotin
V V Tkachëv
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2003;(9):1-8
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - economics - prevention & control
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Risk factors
Russia
Sex Factors
Workers' Compensation - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The article covers first published main parameters of management and practical activities of national system for mandatory social insurance of workmen's occupational risks within a Federal Law No 125-FL "On mandatory social insurance against occupational accidents and diseases". The authors present dynamics of insurers (employers) registration, values of allocation rates, dynamics and structure of insurance payments, results of investigations on traumatism and occupational diseases. The suggestions are ways to improve the existing system from occupational medicine viewpoint.
PubMed ID
14593647 View in PubMed
Less detail

An analysis of occupational blood lead trends in Manitoba, 1979 through 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226244
Source
Am J Public Health. 1991 Jun;81(6):736-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
A. Yassi
M. Cheang
M. Tenenbein
G. Bawden
J. Spiegel
T. Redekop
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1991 Jun;81(6):736-40
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - standards
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Lead Poisoning - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Longitudinal Studies
Manitoba - epidemiology
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Occupational Diseases - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Population Surveillance
Abstract
While regulations for workplace lead exposure become more strict, their effectiveness in decreasing blood lead concentrations and the method by which this is attained have not been evaluated.
An analysis was conducted of 10,190 blood lead samples from employees of 10 high-risk workplaces collected in Manitoba, 1979-87, as part of regulated occupational surveillance.
A significant decrease in blood lead concentrations was observed overall as well as for each individual company. A 1979 government regulation to reduce blood lead to below 3.38 mumol/L (70 micrograms/dl) was followed by a drop in blood lead concentrations; a 1983 order to reduce blood leads to below 2.90 mumol/L (60 micrograms/dl) was not followed by such a drop. Longitudinal analysis by individual workers suggested that companies were complying by use of administrative control, i.e., removing workers to lower lead areas until blood lead levels had fallen, then returning them to high lead areas.
Focusing upon blood lead as the sole criterion for compliance is not effective; regulations must specifically require environmental monitoring and controls. Biological surveillance serves as "back-up" to environmental surveillance and this database illustrates the usefulness of a comprehensive centralized surveillance system.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1987 Aug;77(8):1006-83605466
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 1988 Summer;9(2):198-2213417861
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1989 Aug 1;111(3):238-442751181
Cites: Br J Ind Med. 1989 Sep;46(9):593-62675956
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Jul 23;317(4):214-83600713
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Dec;79 Suppl:9-112817212
Cites: Clin Chem. 1975 Apr;21(4):558-611116290
Cites: Medicine (Baltimore). 1983 Jul;62(4):221-476410150
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1986 Nov;76(11):1299-3022945445
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1989 Dec;79 Suppl:46-522530908
PubMed ID
2029043 View in PubMed
Less detail

The application of Ontario human rights legislation to the practice of occupational medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197354
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2000 Jul;50(5):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2000
Author
M K Schweigert
C J Ritter
D. MacKenzie
Author Affiliation
Occupational Health Services Program, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. m.schweigert@utoronto.ca
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2000 Jul;50(5):348-52
Date
Jul-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Policy
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational Medicine - legislation & jurisprudence
Ontario
Prejudice
Substance Abuse Detection
Abstract
Although human rights legislation has important implications for occupational physicians, these implications may be overlooked in the practice of occupational medicine in other countries where human rights legislation may be different. The potential for significant oversights becomes greater as organizations continue to centralize international business support functions, such as occupational health services, operating from a single site. Human rights legislation has important implications with respect to policy decisions upon which an occupational physician has influence. This includes decisions about whether to conduct drug and alcohol testing; the performance of medical examinations; evaluating issues related to health and safety concerns of pregnant employees; and the need to work accommodate those with handicaps as defined by human rights legislation. This article examines the application of the Ontario human rights legislation in these areas.
PubMed ID
10975134 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Application of tobacco smoking regulations in restaurants in Tromsö 1998]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67436
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 10;121(4):410-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2001
Author
A. Emaus
M L Løchen
R. Høifødt
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Tromsø 9037 Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 10;121(4):410-2
Date
Feb-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Questionnaires
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Smoking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Under the Norwegian Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act, a minimum of 50% of tables in restaurants have to be in smoke-free areas. The Ministry of Health and Social Affairs has defined "smoke-free restaurants" as a priority objective in its anti-tobacco strategy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We have investigated smoking policies in restaurants in the City of Tromsø in Northern Norway, as reported by restaurateurs in 1998. Representatives of all the 85 restaurants, bars and pubs in the city were interviewed and their smoking policies and habits reported. This study was part of the local health authority's evaluation of the degree of compliance with the legislation. RESULTS: In 71% of establishments, at least 50% of tables were smoke-free; in 88%, smoking areas were in compliance with the legislation. 86% of restaurateurs reported a positive or neutral attitude to the legislation, 80% thought that their guests were of the same opinion. 47% smoked every day; however, there was no association between smoking habits and smoking policies. INTERPRETATION: Though the prevalence of smoking was high among restaurateurs, this did not affect their attitudes towards the Environmental Tobacco Smoke Act or their policies on smoking.
PubMed ID
11255852 View in PubMed
Less detail

[ASLE for chemicals in the air of workplace. History, contemporary state, prospects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130011
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2011;(7):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
K K Sidorov
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2011;(7):33-7
Date
2011
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - chemistry - classification
Government Regulation
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Occupational Exposure - analysis - legislation & jurisprudence
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Russia
Workplace - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Abstract
The authors followed historical background of occurrence, development, transformation and contemporary state of topic concerning ASLE for chemicals in the air of workplace over 1977-2010 in USSR and Russian Federation. The article covers prospects to improve regulation and methodic aspects of prompt regulation for industrial chemicals in the air of workplace.
PubMed ID
22043522 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of the Swedish work environment and work environment research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87128
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2007;33 Suppl 1:27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007

The client's right to know versus the nurse's right to be protected from harm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206920
Source
Nurs BC. 1997 Nov-Dec;29(5):11-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Ellis
Source
Nurs BC. 1997 Nov-Dec;29(5):11-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Humans
Legislation, Nursing
Occupational health - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Privacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Safety
Violence - prevention & control
Abstract
The other day, several nurses on our medical-surgical unit got into a heated debate about staff identification. One nurse was upset that her uncle who had been a patient in another hospital had not been able to find out the names of the nurses who cared for him. Her uncle wanted to write the hospital about concerns he had on the nursing care he received and was very frustrated because the hospital wouldn't tell him the names of the nurses. Some of us said the hospital was right, employers have to protect nurses from harm and should not release the names.
PubMed ID
9423432 View in PubMed
Less detail

A comparison of REACH-derived no-effect levels for workers with EU indicative occupational exposure limit values and national limit values in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270856
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2015 May;59(4):401-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Sallamari Tynkkynen
Tiina Santonen
Helene Stockmann-Juvala
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2015 May;59(4):401-15
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
European Union
Finland
Government Regulation
Hazardous Substances - standards
Humans
Material Safety Data Sheets - legislation & jurisprudence
No-Observed-Adverse-Effect Level
Occupational Exposure - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Occupational Health - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Risk assessment
Threshold Limit Values
Workplace
Abstract
The purpose of occupational exposure limits values (OELs) is to regulate exposure to chemicals and minimize the risk of health effects at work. National authorities are responsible for the setting and updating of national OELs. In addition, the EU sets indicative occupational exposure limit values (IOELVs), which have to be considered by the Member States. Under the new European legislation on chemicals (REACH), manufacturers and importers are obliged to establish derived no-effect levels (DNELs) for chemicals that are manufactured or imported in quantities >10 tonnes per year. Chemical safety data sheets must report both OELs and the DNEL values, if such have been set. This may cause confusion at workplaces, especially if the values differ from each other. In this study, we explored how EU IOELVs and Finnish national OELs [Haitallisiksi tunnetut pitoisuudet (HTP) values] correlate with worker inhalation DNELs for substances registered under REACH. The long-term DNEL value for workers (inhalation) was identical to the corresponding IOELV for the majority of the substances (64/87 cases). Comparison of DNELs with HTP values revealed that the values were identical or close to each other in 159 cases (49%), whereas the DNEL was considerably higher in 69 cases, and considerably lower in 87 cases. Examples of cases with high differences between Finnish national OELs and DNELs are given. However, as the DNELs were not systematically lower than the OELs, the default assessment factors suggested by REACH technical guidance had obviously not been used in many of the REACH registrations.
PubMed ID
25638729 View in PubMed
Less detail

112 records – page 1 of 12.