Skip header and navigation

Refine By

29 records – page 1 of 3.

Actual vs. best practices for young children with cerebral palsy: a survey of paediatric occupational therapists and physical therapists in Quebec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160768
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2008 Jan-Mar;11(1):60-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
M N Saleh
N. Korner-Bitensky
L. Snider
F. Malouin
B. Mazer
E. Kennedy
M A Roy
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University and Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire en réadaptation du Montréal métropolitain, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. maysoun.saleh@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Dev Neurorehabil. 2008 Jan-Mar;11(1):60-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Cerebral Palsy - rehabilitation
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Interviews as Topic
Male
Occupational Therapy - standards
Pediatrics - standards
Physical Therapy Modalities - standards
Quality of Health Care
Quebec
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cerebral palsy (CP) constitutes a substantial portion of paediatric rehabilitation, yet little is known regarding actual occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) practices. This study describes OT and PT practices for young children with CP in Quebec, Canada.
This was a cross-sectional survey. All eligible, consenting paediatric occupational therapists (OTs) and physical therapists (PTs) were interviewed using a structured telephone interview based on vignettes of two typical children with CP at two age points--18 months and 4 years. Reported practices were grouped according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).
91.9% of PTs (n=62; 83.8% participation rate) and 67.1% of OTs (n=85; 91.4% participation rate) reported using at least one standardized paediatric assessment. OT and PT interventions focused primarily on impairments and primary function (such as gait function and activities of daily living). Both professions gave little attention to interventions related to play and recreation/leisure. Clinicians reported the need for more training and education specific to CP and to the use of research findings in clinical practice.
Wide variations and gaps were identified in clinicians' responses suggesting the need for a basic standard of OT and PT management as well as strategies to encourage knowledge dissemination regarding current best practice.
PubMed ID
17943507 View in PubMed
Less detail

An occupational therapist as a sexual health clinician in the management of spinal cord injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240114
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1984 Oct;51(4):172-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984
Author
W T Miller
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1984 Oct;51(4):172-5
Date
Oct-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Humans
Occupational Therapy - standards
Role
Spinal Cord Injuries - therapy
Abstract
The Sexual Health Clinician is a health care specialist who is able to assess the sexual potential of physically disabled persons and assist them in the development of acceptable alternatives in sexual practices. This specialty role was first developed at the Spinal Cord Injury Unit, Shaughnessy Hospital in Vancouver, B.C., Canada, to answer a need of spinal cord injured patients, their partners and family. The opportunity to join the Service arose in May, 1981 following one year as the Senior Occupational Therapist on the Spinal Cord Injury Unit. This paper, which describes the experience of an occupational therapist as a member of the Sexual Health Service, is presented in five brief parts: 1. a background history; 2. a description of the sexual problems of the spinal cord injured and the goals of rehabilitation in this area; 3. the role of the Sexual Health Clinician; 4. the strengths and limitations of Occupational Therapy in this new role; 5. a brief discussion of the the need for a sex-related role and curriculum for students of Occupational Therapy.
PubMed ID
10268922 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of the guidelines for client-centred practice to paediatric occupational therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229292
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1990 Apr;57(2):88-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
D. Stewart
S. Harvey
Author Affiliation
Erinoak Serving Young People With Physical Disabilities, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 2M5.
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1990 Apr;57(2):88-94
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Humans
Occupational Therapy - standards
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Planning - standards
Pediatrics - standards
Referral and Consultation
Rehabilitation Centers - standards
Abstract
This paper outlines the process of incorporating the "Guidelines For the Client-Centred Practice of Occupational Therapy" into the practice of occupational therapy in an out-patient rehabilitation facility serving young people with physical disabilities. Specifically, the areas of practice addressed are screening and assessment. The process started in 1987 with an identification of the need to find a holistic framework that meets the complex needs of clients with chronic physical disabilities. The conceptual model of occupational performance, as outlined in the Guidelines, provided such a framework. The process of incorporating the Guidelines into the screening and assessment practices of occupational therapists at Erinoak Serving Young People With Physical Disabilities is described, with examples of documents developed by the department. Suggestions are given to integrate the conceptual model of occupational performance into the practice of occupational therapists working with children and adolescents with physical disabilities.
PubMed ID
10104739 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists position statement. Occupational therapy and home and continuing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169382
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):120-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):120-1
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Home Care Services - standards
Humans
Occupational Therapy - standards
Patient Advocacy
PubMed ID
16680915 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical Relevance and Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Version of the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306009
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2020; 2020:2453239
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Study
Date
2020
Author
Jane Holstein
Gunilla M Liedberg
Yolanda Suarez-Balcazar
Anette Kjellberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2020; 2020:2453239
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Study
Keywords
Adult
Cultural Competency - organization & administration
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - standards
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
Based on the increasing diversity of Swedish society, health professionals, like occupational therapists, find it challenging to provide culturally competent services to international clients. Consequently, cultural competence among professionals needs to be measured and improved using psychometrically tested instruments. This study examines the clinical relevance, construct validity, and reliability of the Swedish version of the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument among Swedish occupational therapists. Material and Methods. A randomised sample of 312 Swedish occupational therapists answered a survey based on the Swedish version of the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument with supplementary questions on the clinical relevance of the instrument. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the clinical relevance of the Swedish version of the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument. Factor analyses, both exploratory and confirmatory, were run to examine the factor structure. Cronbach's alpha was performed to assess the internal consistency of the instrument. Results. The participants reported that the 24 items had high clinical relevance. The validation yielded a three-factor model: openness and awareness, workplace support, and interaction skills. All three of these factors showed high loadings. Conclusions. The study results indicated positive clinical relevance and psychometric properties for the Swedish version of the Cultural Competence Assessment Instrument and strong support to be utilised in Sweden. The implications of this study are important given the rapid growth in migration over the last few decades. A self-rating instrument measuring cultural competence could support occupational therapists' professional knowledge and development when they interact with international clients. As the tool was originally developed in English in the United States, the feedback from the Swedish version could potentially be useful for the instrument in modified form and for use by occupational therapists in English-speaking countries.
PubMed ID
32395094 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a tool to measure clinical competence in occupational therapy: a pilot study?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199341
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Feb;67(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
P. Salvatori
S. Baptiste
M. Ward
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario. salvator@fhs.mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2000 Feb;67(1):51-60
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Medical Audit
Occupational Therapy - standards
Pilot Projects
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Professional Competence
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
Clinical competence is generally defined as a combination of knowledge, skill and professional behaviour. It is typically assessed using written tests, direct observation, chart audit, client satisfaction surveys and supervisor ratings. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a chart-stimulated recall (CSR) measure that combines the methods of chart audit and clinician interview to assess the clinical competence of practicing occupational therapists. The CSR tool was developed using the Canadian Guidelines for Client-Centred Practice and taps global domains of competence: use of theory, assessment, program planning, intervention, discharge planning, follow-up, program evaluation, clinical reasoning and professional behaviours. This pilot study involved two independent raters/interviewers who assessed twelve occupational therapy clinicians on two occasions using a random sample of client cases/records on each occasion Results indicate that the CSR tool is not only reliable and valid, but also sufficiently generic to be used in a variety of practice settings as a global measure of on-the-job performance.
PubMed ID
10695169 View in PubMed
Less detail

The ethics of Canadian entry-to-practice pain competencies: how are we doing?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115877
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2013 Jan-Feb;18(1):25-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judy Watt-Watson
Elizabeth Peter
A John Clark
Anne Dewar
Thomas Hadjistavropoulos
Pat Morley-Forster
Christine O'Leary
Lalitha Raman-Wilms
Anita Unruh
Karen Webber
Marsha Campbell-Yeo
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. j.watt.watson@utoronto.ca
Source
Pain Res Manag. 2013 Jan-Feb;18(1):25-32
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - standards
Education, Dental - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Education, Nursing - standards
Education, Pharmacy - standards
Education, Professional - standards
Ethics, Clinical - education
Health Personnel - standards
Humans
Occupational Therapy - standards
Pain
Physical Therapy Specialty - standards
Abstract
Although unrelieved pain continues to represent a significant problem, prelicensure educational programs tend to include little content related to pain. Standards for professional competence strongly influence curricula and have the potential to ensure that health science students have the knowledge and skill to manage pain in a way that also allows them to meet professional ethical standards.
To perform a systematic, comprehensive examination to determine the entry-to-practice competencies related to pain required for Canadian health science and veterinary students, and to examine how the presence and absence of pain competencies relate to key competencies of an ethical nature.
Entry-to-practice competency requirements related to pain knowledge, skill and judgment were surveyed from national, provincial and territorial documents for dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology and veterinary medicine.
Dentistry included two and nursing included nine specific pain competencies. No references to competencies related to pain were found in the remaining health science documents. In contrast, the national competency requirements for veterinary medicine, surveyed as a comparison, included nine pain competencies. All documents included competencies pertaining to ethics.
The lack of competencies related to pain has implications for advancing skillful and ethical practice. The lack of attention to pain competencies limits the capacity of health care professionals to alleviate suffering, foster autonomy and use resources justly. Influencing professional bodies to increase the number of required entry-to-practice pain competencies may ultimately have the greatest impact on education and practice.
Notes
Cites: Anaesth Intensive Care. 2011 Jan;39(1):11-421375085
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2011 Mar-Apr;16(2):77-8021499581
Cites: J Pain. 2011 Jul;12(7):725-4621435953
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2002 Winter;7(4):179-8412518174
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jan 9;287(2):226-3511779266
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2011 Sep;15(8):789-9521330174
Cites: Pain. 2004 May;109(1-2):73-8515082128
Cites: Pain. 2004 Jul;110(1-2):140-815275761
Cites: Lancet. 2006 May 13;367(9522):1618-2516698416
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2007 Spring;12(1):39-4717372633
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2007 Jul;105(1):205-2117578977
Cites: West J Nurs Res. 2007 Aug;29(5):561-80; discussion 581-817548894
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2008 Apr;34(4):285-9618375683
Cites: Pain Med. 2009 Apr;10(3):506-2019254336
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2009 May-Jun;14(3):211-619547760
Cites: Pain Res Manag. 2009 Nov-Dec;14(6):439-4420011714
Cites: Anesthesiology. 2010 Apr;112(4):957-6920234307
Cites: Can J Anaesth. 2010 Jun;57(6):539-4820393821
PubMed ID
23457683 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evidence-Based Practice in Primary Care Occupational Therapy: A Cross-Sectional Survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297833
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2018; 2018:5376764
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Ann-Charlotte Lindström
Susanne Bernhardsson
Author Affiliation
Närhälsan Rehabilitation Sörhaga, Alingsås, Sweden.
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2018; 2018:5376764
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient Preference
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Primary Health Care
Self Efficacy
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Understanding of attitudes, knowledge, and behaviour related to evidence-based practice (EBP) and guidelines in Swedish occupational therapy is limited. The study aims were to investigate attitudes, knowledge, and behaviour related to evidence-based practice and guidelines of Swedish occupational therapists in primary care.
A web-based survey of 94 Swedish primary care occupational therapists (response rate 53.7%). Data were analysed using logistic regressions.
Attitudes towards EBP and guidelines were highly positive (97%-98%). About half of the respondents reported confidence in finding and using evidence. Almost two-thirds reported being aware of guidelines and 47% knowing where to find guidelines. Four-fifths stated that they had easy access to guidelines and 75% that they used guidelines frequently. Men were more likely to feel confident to find research (OR 8.58, 95% CI 1.03 to 71.66; p = 0.047) and have easy access to guidelines (OR 9.10, 95% CI 1.94 to 42.83; p = 0.005). Occupational therapists older than 50 years were more likely to integrate patient preferences with guideline use (OR 6.44, 95% CI 1.14 to 36.57; p = 0.035). Few reported reading scientific articles, and many expressed uncertainty in finding research. The main barrier for using guidelines was reported to be lack of time.
Although attitudes among primary care occupational therapists towards EBP are positive and a large proportion report using guidelines, many state that they want to learn more and improve their evidence-based practice skills. The findings suggest that education measures need to be taken to address the identified shortcomings.
PubMed ID
30538614 View in PubMed
Less detail

How rehabilitation therapists gather, evaluate, and implement new knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188585
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2002;22(3):170-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Susan Rappolt
Maria Tassone
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, 256 McCaul Street, Toronto, ON M5T 1W5.
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2002;22(3):170-80
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Continuing - methods
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Learning
Occupational Therapy - standards
Peer Group
Physical Therapy Specialty - standards
Professional Competence
Random Allocation
Urban Population
Abstract
Rehabilitation therapists are strongly encouraged to apply research to their practices, but relatively little is known about the processes therapists use for continuing their education. This study examines the strategies used by a sample of therapists to gather new knowledge, evaluate its appropriateness to their clinical problems, and implement new learning into their practices.
Twenty-four randomly selected occupational therapists and physical therapists from a large metropolitan area participated in in-depth interviews. Descriptive codes within interview transcripts described participants' individual approaches to continuing education (CE). Themes derived from comparative analysis across interviews were interpreted, building on prior understandings and suggesting strategies for CE research and programs.
Participants valued formal CE highly and expressed frustration concerning its limited availability. Most participants relied on informal consultations with peers as their first educational resource. Peers also supported participants' evaluation and implementation of new knowledge. Although seven participants reported use of systematic methods to access, evaluate, and implement new knowledge, others described more haphazard approaches toward evaluation and application of their learning. Participants identified economic, administrative, and interprofessional barriers to integration of new knowledge into their practices.
There is a need to develop and incorporate guidelines for evaluating and implementing learning within formal and informal CE programs. The appeal of formal CE suggests that more efficient strategies for continuing rehabilitation are required. Therapists' heavy reliance on peers suggests that educationally influential therapists may be effective media for informal CE interventions. CE targeted to policy makers should focus on promoting organizational change to enhance therapists' translation of research into practice.
PubMed ID
12227239 View in PubMed
Less detail

29 records – page 1 of 3.