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973 records – page 1 of 98.

A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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[25-year experience of Sverdlovsk regional occupational center on the basis of the research institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198488
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S G Domnin
E P Zhovtiak
A G Gol'del'man
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - supply & distribution - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Sverdlovsk Regional Occupational Center based on the Research Institute has highly qualified staff, incorporates ambulatory department, hospital with modern diagnostic and therapeutic equipment. The Center performs multiple tasks, being an organizational and methodic, diagnostic and occupational examination institution using up-to-date advances in industrial medicine.
PubMed ID
10826371 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism following a workplace intervention for older food industry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133397
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
A. Siukola
P. Virtanen
H. Huhtala
C-H Nygård
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. anna.siukola@uta.fi
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Age Factors
Finland
Food Industry
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - methods
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Abstract
The effects of workplace interventions on sickness absence are poorly understood, in particular in ageing workers.
To analyse the effects of a senior programme on sickness absence among blue-collar food industry workers of a food company in Finland.
We followed up 129 employees aged 55 years or older, who participated in a senior programme (intervention group), and 229 employees of the same age from the same company who did not participate (control group). Total sickness absence days and spells of 1-3, 4-7, 8-21 and >21 days were recorded for the members of the intervention group from the year before joining the programme and for the control group starting at age 54 years. Both groups were followed for up to 6 years.
The median number of sickness absence days per person-year increased significantly from baseline in both groups during the follow-up. Compared with the control group, the intervention group had increased risk for 1-3 days spells [rate ratio 1.34 (1.21-1.48)] and 4-7 days spells [rate ratio 1.23 (1.07-1.41)], but the risk for >21 days spells was decreased [rate ratio 0.68 (0.53-0.88)] after participation in the senior programme.
A programme to enhance individual work well-being in ageing workers may increase short-term but reduce long-term sickness absence.
PubMed ID
21709171 View in PubMed
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Access to and continuity of primary medical care of different providers as perceived by the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164689
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Pirjo Halonen
Arto Vehviläinen
Jorma Takala
Esko Kumpusalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Unit of Family Practice, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland. pekka.mantyselka@uku.fi
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2007 Mar;25(1):27-32
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Continuity of Patient Care
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Private Sector
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Abstract
To study people's views on the accessibility and continuity of primary medical care provided by different providers: a public primary healthcare centre (PPHC), occupational healthcare (OHC), and a private practice (PP).
A nationwide population-based questionnaire study.
Finland.
A total of 6437 (from a sample of 10,000) Finns aged 15-74 years.
Period of time (in days) to get an appointment with any physician was assessed via a single structured question. Accessibility and continuity were evaluated with a five-category Likert scale. Values 4-5 were regarded as good.
Altogether 72% had found that they could obtain an appointment with a physician within three days, while 6% had to wait more than two weeks. Older subjects and subjects with chronic diseases perceived waiting times as longer more often than younger subjects and those without chronic diseases. The proportion of subjects who perceived access to care to be good was 35% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 78% in a PP. The proportion of subjects who were able to get successive appointments with the same doctor was 45% in a PPHC, 68% in OHC, and 81% in a PP. A personal doctor system was related to good continuity and access in a PPHC.
Access to and continuity of care in Finland are suboptimal for people suffering from chronic diseases. The core features of good primary healthcare are still not available within the medical care provided by public health centres.
Notes
Cites: Fam Pract. 2000 Jun;17(3):236-4210846142
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2000 Nov;50(460):882-711141874
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2001 Jun;19(2):131-4411482415
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2002 Jun;52(479):459-6212051209
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2002 Oct;37(5):1403-1712479503
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Sep;24(3):140-416923622
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1992 Dec;10(4):290-41480869
Cites: J Fam Pract. 2004 Dec;53(12):974-8015581440
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jan 17;174(2):177-8316415462
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2006 Mar;24(1):1-216464807
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;1(3):149-5515043376
PubMed ID
17354156 View in PubMed
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Accreditation of occupational health services in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278579
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2015 Dec;65(9):722-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
A. Lie
O. Bjørnstad
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2015 Dec;65(9):722-4
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Medicine
Pilot Projects
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
In 2010, an accreditation system for occupational health services (OHS) in Norway was implemented.
To examine OHS experiences of the accreditation system in Norway 4 years after its implementation.
A web-based questionnaire was sent to all accredited OHS asking about their experiences with the accreditation system. Responses were compared with a similar survey conducted in 2011.
The response rate was 76% (173/228). OHS reported that the most common changes they had had to make to achieve accreditation were: improvement of their quality assurance system (53%), a plan for competence development (44%) and increased staffing in occupational hygiene (36%) and occupational medicine (28%). The OHS attributed improved quality in their own OHS (56%) and in OHS in Norway (47%), to the accreditation process.
The accreditation system was well accepted by OHS, who reported that it had improved the quality of their OHS and of OHS in Norway. The results are similar to the findings of a 2011 survey.
Notes
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2002;15(2):159-6312216773
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2002;15(2):173-712216775
PubMed ID
26276757 View in PubMed
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[Accreditation should be discussed! Need for substance abuse testing at the workplace should be increased]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10925
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 28;95(5):407-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-1998
Author
O. Beck
P. Hjemdahl
Author Affiliation
Avdelningen för klinisk farmakologi, Karolinska laboratoriet, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Jan 28;95(5):407-8
Date
Jan-28-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Occupational Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Substance Abuse Detection - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
9492489 View in PubMed
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[Acoustic trauma--preventive use of hearing protectors]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75996
Source
Vardfacket. 1992 Feb 20;16(4):XV-XVIII
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1992

Activities of occupational health professionals in academic environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234500
Source
Am J Prev Med. 1987 Nov-Dec;3(6):327-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Bresnitz
K M Rest
E K Leventhal
Author Affiliation
Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19129.
Source
Am J Prev Med. 1987 Nov-Dec;3(6):327-31
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Commerce
Hospitals
Humans
Occupational Health Services - economics - manpower - supply & distribution
Personnel, Hospital
Policy Making
Professional Staff Committees
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical
United States
Abstract
We surveyed American and Canadian medical schools to assess the extent to which occupational health professionals provided services to their own institutions. Ninety-two of 155 schools (60 percent) responded to a mailed questionnaire. Forty-six (51 percent) of the respondents had an occupational health service distinct from an employee health service. Two thirds of the respondents provided occupational health services to business and industry. Such professionals based in nonclinical departments were more likely to provide educational and epidemiologic services for hospital employees than were professionals based in clinical departments. In those institutions with risk management, biohazards, or health and safety committees, less than one half of the occupational health professionals in those institutions were members of those committees. Five respondents felt that there were financial disincentives to providing occupational health services to their institution's employees. We conclude that academic-based occupational health professionals have inadequate input into the provision of such services at their own institutions.
PubMed ID
3452372 View in PubMed
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973 records – page 1 of 98.