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A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
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Absenteeism following a workplace intervention for older food industry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133397
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
A. Siukola
P. Virtanen
H. Huhtala
C-H Nygård
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, FI-33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. anna.siukola@uta.fi
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 2011 Dec;61(8):583-5
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Age Factors
Finland
Food Industry
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - methods
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Abstract
The effects of workplace interventions on sickness absence are poorly understood, in particular in ageing workers.
To analyse the effects of a senior programme on sickness absence among blue-collar food industry workers of a food company in Finland.
We followed up 129 employees aged 55 years or older, who participated in a senior programme (intervention group), and 229 employees of the same age from the same company who did not participate (control group). Total sickness absence days and spells of 1-3, 4-7, 8-21 and >21 days were recorded for the members of the intervention group from the year before joining the programme and for the control group starting at age 54 years. Both groups were followed for up to 6 years.
The median number of sickness absence days per person-year increased significantly from baseline in both groups during the follow-up. Compared with the control group, the intervention group had increased risk for 1-3 days spells [rate ratio 1.34 (1.21-1.48)] and 4-7 days spells [rate ratio 1.23 (1.07-1.41)], but the risk for >21 days spells was decreased [rate ratio 0.68 (0.53-0.88)] after participation in the senior programme.
A programme to enhance individual work well-being in ageing workers may increase short-term but reduce long-term sickness absence.
PubMed ID
21709171 View in PubMed
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Adult supervision and pediatric injuries in the agricultural worksite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157325
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2008 May;40(3):1149-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Barbara A Morrongiello
William Pickett
Richard L Berg
James G Linneman
Robert J Brison
Barbara Marlenga
Author Affiliation
Psychology Department, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 2008 May;40(3):1149-56
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agriculture - statistics & numerical data
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Employment
Female
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Parenting
Retrospective Studies
United States
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Appropriate supervision is recommended as a strategy to prevent pediatric farm injuries, yet virtually nothing is known about the quality of adult supervision on farms. We therefore explored the nature of adult supervision among pediatric farm injury cases using three theoretically relevant dimensions of supervision: (1) attention, (2) proximity, and (3) continuity. We examined a retrospective case series of 334 pediatric farm injury cases from Canada and the United States that resulted in death or required hospitalization. Patterns of supervision were coded according to the three dimensions. Approximately two-thirds of the injured children (231/334; 69%) had an adult supervisor available (attention). The supervisor was in close proximity of the child in only about half the cases (169/334; 51%) and it was even less common for the supervision to be continuous (37%). Thus, many injuries occurred when children were inadequately supervised. However, approximately one-third of the injured children (112/334; 34%) had what in other circumstances would be considered adequate adult supervision at the time of their injury event, defined theoretically as having supervision available, proximal, and continuous. Yet, children on farms were injured even in the presence of adequate adult supervision. These findings, along with a growing body of literature examining pediatric farm injuries, suggest a need to develop a new definition of adequate adult supervision within the context of the agricultural work environment, or to consider restricting the access of children, especially the very young, to this hazardous worksite.
PubMed ID
18460383 View in PubMed
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An ecological study of regional variation in work injuries among young workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163385
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
F Curtis Breslin
Peter Smith
James R Dunn
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. cbreslin@iwh.on.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2007;7:91
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Causality
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Ecology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Male
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Wounds and Injuries - classification - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The investigation of geographic variation in occupational injuries has received little attention. Young workers 15 to 24 years are of particular concern because they consistently show elevated occupational injury rates compared to older workers. The present study sought to: (a) to describe the geographic variation of work injuries; (b) to determine whether geographic variation remained after controlling for relevant demographic and job characteristics; (c) to identify the region-level factors that correlate with the geographic variation.
Using workers compensation claims and census data, we estimated claim rates per 100 full-time equivalents for 15 to 24 year olds in 46 regions in Ontario. A total of 21 region-level indicators were derived primarily from Census and Labour Force Survey data to reflect social and material deprivation of the region as well as demographic and employment characteristics of youth living in those areas.
Descriptive findings showed substantial geographic variation in young worker injury rates, even after controlling for several job and demographic variables. Region-level characteristics such as greater residential stability were associated with low work injury rates. Also, regions with the lowest claim rates tended to have proportionally fewer cuts and burns than high-claim-rate regions.
The finding of substantial geographic variation in youth claim rates even after controlling for demographic and job factors can aid in targeting prevention resource. The association between region-level indicators such as residential stability and youth work injury suggests that work injury prevention strategies can be integrated with other local economic development measures. The findings partially support the notion that work safety measures may be unevenly distributed with respect to regional socio-economic factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17521448 View in PubMed
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An occupational health intervention programme for workers at high risk for sickness absence. Cost effectiveness analysis based on a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160853
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):242-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
S. Taimela
S. Justén
P. Aronen
H. Sintonen
E. Läärä
A. Malmivaara
J. Tiekso
T. Aro
Author Affiliation
Evalua International, PO Box 35, FIN-01531 Vantaa, Finland. simo.taimela@evalua.fi
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):242-8
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Finland
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Resources - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health Services - economics - methods
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Risk assessment
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine whether, from a healthcare perspective, a specific occupational health intervention is cost effective in reducing sickness absence when compared with usual care in occupational health in workers with high risk of sickness absence.
Economic evaluation alongside a randomised controlled trial. 418 workers with high risk of sickness absence from one corporation were randomised to intervention (n = 209) or to usual care (n = 209). The subjects in the intervention group were invited to occupational health service for a consultation. The intervention included, if appropriate, a referral to specialist treatment. Register data of sickness absence were available for 384 subjects and questionnaire data on healthcare costs from 272 subjects. Missing direct total cost data were imputed using a two-part regression model. Primary outcome measures were sickness absence days and direct healthcare costs up to 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness (CE) was expressed as an incremental CE ratio, CE plane and CE acceptability curve with both available direct total cost data and missing total cost data imputed.
After one year, the mean of sickness absence was 30 days in the usual care group (n = 192) and 11 days less (95% CI 1 to 20 days) in the intervention group (n = 192). Among the employees with available cost data, the mean days of sickness absence were 22 and 24, and the mean total cost euro974 and euro1049 in the intervention group (n = 134) and in the usual care group (n = 138), respectively. The intervention turned out to be dominant-both cost saving and more effective than usual occupational health care. The saving was euro43 per sickness absence day avoided with available direct total cost data, and euro17 with missing total cost data imputed.
One year follow-up data show that occupational health intervention for workers with high risk of sickness absence is a cost effective use of healthcare resources.
Notes
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Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):219-2018349154
PubMed ID
17933885 View in PubMed
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Antecedents and consequences of nurse managers' perceptions of organizational support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169937
Source
Nurs Econ. 2006 Jan-Feb;24(1):20-9, 3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Nancy Purdy
Julia Cho
Joan Almost
Author Affiliation
Nursing Research, University of Western Ontario, School of Nursing, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Nurs Econ. 2006 Jan-Feb;24(1):20-9, 3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Nurse Administrators - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Professional Autonomy
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Self Efficacy
Social Perception
Abstract
The antecedents and consequences of nurse managers' perceptions of organizational support were evaluated. Study results revealed that changeable work environment factors are important precursors of perceptions of organizational support, which, in turn, result in positive work attitudes and better health.
PubMed ID
16583602 View in PubMed
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Are changes in occupational physical activity level compensated by changes in exercise behavior?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300388
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):940-943
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Carla F J Nooijen
Borja Del Pozo-Cruz
Gisela Nyberg
Taren Sanders
Maria R Galanti
Yvonne Forsell
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):940-943
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior - physiology
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Sedentary Behavior
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Physically active occupations with high-energy expenditure may lead to lower motivation to exercise during leisure time, while the reverse can be hypothesized for sedentary occupations. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of changing occupational activity level on exercise behavior.
Data on occupational physical activity and leisure time exercise were taken from a population-based cohort, with surveys completed in 2010 and 2014. Using data on those employed in both years, two trajectories were analyzed: (i) participants who changed from sedentary to active occupations and (ii) participants who changed from active to sedentary occupations. Exercise was reported in hours per week and changes from 2010 to 2014 were categorized as decreased, increased or stable. Associations were expressed as ORs and 95% CIs adjusting for age, gender and education.
Data were available for 12 969 participants (57% women, aged 45 ± 9 years, 57% highly educated). Relative to participants whose occupational activity was stable, participants who changed to active occupations (n = 549) were more likely to decrease exercise (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.02-1.47) and those who changed to sedentary occupations (n = 373) more likely to increase exercise levels (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.52).
People changing from sedentary to active occupations compensate by exercising less, and those changing from physically active to sedentary occupations seem to compensate by exercising more in their leisure time. When developing and evaluating interventions to reduce occupational sedentary behavior or to promote exercise, mutual influences on physical activity of different contexts should be considered.
PubMed ID
29385424 View in PubMed
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Are immigrants, ethnic and linguistic minorities over-represented in jobs with a high level of compensated risk? Results from a Montréal, Canada study using census and workers' compensation data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141647
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Sep;53(9):875-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Stéphanie Premji
Patrice Duguay
Karen Messing
Katherine Lippel
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. stephaniepremji@yahoo.com
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2010 Sep;53(9):875-85
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Censuses
Confidence Intervals
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Language
Male
Minority Groups - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Few Canadian data sources allow the examination of disparities by ethnicity, language, or immigrant status in occupational exposures or health outcomes. However, it is possible to document the mechanisms that can create disparities, such as the over-representation of population groups in high-risk jobs. We evaluated, in the Montréal context, the relationship between the social composition of jobs and their associated risk level.
We used data from the 2001 Statistics Canada census and from Québec's workers' compensation board for 2000-2002 to characterize job categories defined as major industrial groups crossed with three professional categories (manual, mixed, non-manual). Immigrant, visible, and linguistic minority status variables were used to describe job composition. The frequency rate of compensated health problems and the average duration of compensation determined job risk level. The relationship between the social composition and risk level of jobs was evaluated with Kendall correlations.
The proportion of immigrants and minorities was positively and significantly linked to the risk level across job categories. Many relationships were significant for women only. In analyses done within manual jobs, relationships with the frequency rate reversed and were significant, except for the relationship with the proportion of individuals with knowledge of French only, which remained positive.
Immigrants, visible, and linguistic minorities in Montréal are more likely to work where there is an increased level of compensated risk. Reversed relationships within manual jobs may be explained by under-reporting and under-compensation in vulnerable populations compared to those with knowledge of the province's majority language.
PubMed ID
20698020 View in PubMed
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Are intrinsic motivational factors of work associated with functional incapacity similarly regardless of the country?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70562
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Oct;59(10):858-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
A. Väänänen
K. Pahkin
P. Huuhtanen
M. Kivimäki
J. Vahtera
T. Theorell
R. Kalimo
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Department of Psychology, Topeliuksenkatu 41 a A, FI-00250 Helsinki, Finland. Ari.Vaananen@ttl.fi
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2005 Oct;59(10):858-63
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
China
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Finland
France
Health status
Humans
Internal-External Control
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Personal Autonomy
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Work - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Many psychosocial models of wellbeing at work emphasise the role of intrinsic motivational factors such as job autonomy, job complexity, and innovativeness. However, little is known about whether the employees of multinational enterprises differ from country to country with regard to intrinsic motivational factors, and whether these factors are associated with wellbeing similarly in the different countries. The purpose of this study was to examine the level of intrinsic motivational factors and their impact on functional incapacity in different countries in a multinational corporation. METHODS: In 2000, data were collected from a globally operating corporation with a questionnaire survey. The participants were 13 795 employees (response rate 59%; 56% under age 45; 80% men; 61% blue collar employees), who worked in similar industrial occupations in five countries (Canada, China, Finland, France, and Sweden). RESULTS: The Chinese employees reported higher autonomy and lower complexity at work than the employees from the other countries. After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and physical work environment, job autonomy, and job complexity at work were associated with functional incapacity in most countries, whereas in China the impact was significantly stronger. In Finland and in China employees with low innovativeness at work were more prone to functional incapacity than corresponding employees in other countries. CONCLUSIONS: The level of intrinsic motivational factors varied between the Chinese employees and those in other countries. In line with theoretical notions, the relation between intrinsic motivational factors of work and functional incapacity followed a similar pattern in the different countries. However, these country specific results show that a culture specific approach to employee wellbeing should also be applied.
PubMed ID
16166359 View in PubMed
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The association between sex segregation, working conditions, and sickness absence among employed women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71151
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Feb;61(2):e7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
G. Hensing
K. Alexanderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Sahlgren Academy at University of Göteborg, Sweden. gunnel.hensing@socmed.gu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2004 Feb;61(2):e7
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allied Health Personnel - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Sweden
Women's health
Women, Working - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
AIMS: To analyse the association between sickness absence and sex segregation of occupation and of work site, respectively, and to analyse work environmental factors associated with high sickness absence. METHODS: The study group consisted of 1075 women employed as nurses, assistant nurses, medical secretaries, or metal workers who answered a questionnaire comprising 218 questions on women's health and living conditions. Sickness absence was collected from employers' and social insurance registers. RESULTS: Women working in the male dominated occupation had in general higher sickness absence compared to those working in female dominated occupations. However, metal workers at female dominated work sites had 2.98 (95% CI 2.17 to 3.79) sick-leave spells per woman and year compared to 1.70 (95% CI 1.29 to 2.10) among those working with almost only men. In spite of a better physical work environment, female metal workers at a female dominated work site had a higher sickness absence than other women, which probably could be explained by the worse psychosocial work environment. Working with more women also had a positive association to increased frequency of sick-leave spells in a multivariate analysis including several known indicators of increased sick-leave. CONCLUSIONS: There was an association between sickness absence and sex segregation, in different directions at the occupational and work site level. The mechanism behind this needs to be more closely understood regarding selection in and out of an occupation and a certain work site.
PubMed ID
14739391 View in PubMed
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213 records – page 1 of 22.