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Association of respiratory symptoms and asthma with occupational exposures: findings from a population-based cross-sectional survey in Telemark, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287942
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 22;7(3):e014018
Publication Type
Article
Date
03-22-2017
Author
R. Abrahamsen
A K M Fell
M V Svendsen
E. Andersson
K. Torén
P K Henneberger
J. Kongerud
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 03 22;7(3):e014018
Date
03-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Respiratory Sounds
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of respiratory symptoms and physician-diagnosed asthma and assess the impact of current occupational exposure.
Cross-sectional analyses of the prevalence of self-reported respiratory health and association with current occupational exposure in a random sample of the general population in Telemark County, Norway.
In 2013, a self-administered questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of the general population, aged 16-50, in Telemark, Norway. The overall response rate was 33%, comprising 16 099 responders.
The prevalence for respiratory symptoms and asthma, and OR of respiratory symptoms and asthma for occupational groups and exposures were calculated. Occupational exposures were assessed using self-reported exposure and an asthma-specific job-exposure matrix (JEM).
The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 11.5%. For the occupational groups, the category with agriculture/fishery workers and craft/related trade workers was associated with wheezing and asthma attack in the past 12 months, showing OR 1.3 (1.1 to 1.6) and 1.9 (1.2 to 2.8), respectively. The group including technicians and associated professionals was also associated with wheezing OR 1.2 (1.0 to 1.3) and asthma attack OR 1.4 (1.1 to 1.9). The JEM data show that exposure to flour was associated with wheezing OR 3.2 (1.4 to 7.3) and woken with dyspnoea OR 3.5 (1.3 to 9.5), whereas exposures to diisocyanates, welding/soldering fumes and exposure to vehicle/motor exhaust were associated with dyspnoea OR 2.9 (1.5 to 5.7), 3.2 (1.6 to 6.4) and 1.4 (1.0 to 1.8), respectively.
The observed prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 11.5%. The 'manual' occupations were associated with respiratory symptoms. Occupational exposure to flour, diisocyanates, welding/soldering fumes and vehicle/motor exhaust was associated with respiratory symptoms in the past 12 months and use of asthma medication. However, prospective data are needed to confirm the observed associations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28336744 View in PubMed
Less detail

Carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations avoid professional exposure to irritants in adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112647
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2013 Dec;69(6):355-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Josefine Bandier
Katrine Ross-Hansen
Berit C Carlsen
Torkil Menné
Allan Linneberg
Steen Stender
Pal B Szecsi
Michael Meldgaard
Jacob P Thyssen
Jeanne D Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermato-Allergology, National Allergy Research Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, 2900, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2013 Dec;69(6):355-62
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Avoidance Learning
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dermatitis, Atopic - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Dermatitis, Irritant - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Female
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotyping Techniques
Health Surveys
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Intermediate Filament Proteins - genetics
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Patch Tests
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are associated with xerosis, atopic dermatitis, and early onset of hand eczema. Irritant exposure is a risk factor for occupational hand eczema, and FLG mutations increase the risk of occupational irritant contact dermatitis on the hands in hospital cohorts. It is unknown whether FLG mutations affect the level of irritant exposure.
To evaluate whether exposure to occupational irritants was dependent on FLG mutations, atopic dermatitis, and age at hand eczema onset.
Randomly chosen Danish adults completed a questionnaire on general health and occupational exposures. Genotyping for FLG mutations (R501X, 2282del4, and R2447X) and patch testing were performed.
Overall, 38.7% of subjects reported present or previous occupational exposure to irritants. Among individuals who reported hand eczema onset before entering their work life, 50.6% (45/89) of FLG non-mutation carriers became exposed to irritants, as compared with 28.6% (4/14) of heterozygous and 0% (0/6) of homozygous mutation carriers (p = 0.006). Avoidance was conspicuous among mutation carriers reporting childhood hand eczema and atopic dermatitis (odds ratio 0.08, 95% confidence interval 0.01-0.65).
Carriers of FLG mutations who have had hand eczema onset in childhood avoid occupational exposure to irritants; the association is most marked with homozygous mutation status combined with atopic dermatitis.
PubMed ID
23808934 View in PubMed
Less detail

A cross-sectional study of the relation between symptoms and physical findings in computer operators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166768
Source
BMC Neurol. 2006;6:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Jørgen R Jepsen
Gert Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Ribe County Hospital, Østergade 81-83, DK-6700 Esbjerg, Denmark. jrj@ribeamt.dk
Source
BMC Neurol. 2006;6:40
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Computers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Pain - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Upper Extremity
Abstract
The character of upper limb disorder in computer operators is subject to debate. A peripheral nerve-involvement is suggested from the common presence of a triad of symptoms consisting of pain, paraestesiae and subjective weakness, and from physical findings suggesting neuropathy. This study aimed to examine the outcome of a detailed neurological examination in computer operators and to compare findings with the presence of symptoms.
96 graphical computer operators answered a modified Nordic Questionnaire including information on perceived pain in the shoulder, elbow, and wrist/hand scored for each region on a VAS-scale 0-9. In addition, they underwent a physical examination including the subjective assessment of the individual function of 11 upper limb muscles, of algesia in five and vibratory threshold in three territories, respectively, and of mechanosensitivity of nerves at seven locations. In order to reflect an involvement of the brachial plexus (chord level), the posterior interosseous nerve and the median nerve at elbow level we defined three patterns of neurological findings illustrating the course of nerves and their innervation. The pain scores summarized for the three upper limb regions (min. = 0, max = 27) in the mouse-operating and contralateral limbs were compared by a Wilcoxon test and the relation to each physical item analyzed by Kendall's rank correlation. The relation of summarized pain to each pattern was studied by application of a test of the trend across ordered groups (patterns).
Pain, paraestesiae and subjective weakness was reported for 67, 23, and 7 mouse-operating limbs, respectively, with the summarized pain scores exceeding 4 in 33 limbs. Abnormal physical findings were prevalent. The summarized pain was significantly related to a reduced function in five muscles, to mechanical allodynia at one location and to elevated threshold to vibration in two territories. Brachial plexopathy was diagnosed in 9/2, median neuropathy in 13/5 and posterior interosseous neuropathy in 13/8 mouse operating/contralateral limbs, respectively. The summarized pain was significantly higher in the mouse-operating limbs and in limbs with any of the defined patterns. There was a significant trend between the summarized pain and the summarized scores for the items contained in each pattern.
This small-scale study of a group of computer-operators currently in work and with no or minor upper limb symptoms has indicated in symptomatic subjects the presence of peripheral nerve-afflictions with specific locations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17078880 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do psychological factors increase the risk for back pain in the general population in both a cross-sectional and prospective analysis?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51847
Source
Eur J Pain. 2005 Aug;9(4):355-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Steven James Linton
Author Affiliation
Department of Behavioral, Social and Legal Sciences-Psychology, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. steven.linton@orebroll.se
Source
Eur J Pain. 2005 Aug;9(4):355-61
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adult
Back Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Pain Measurement - standards
Prospective Studies
Psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
This study aimed to conduct a comprehensive evaluation of background, individual and workplace psychological risk factors to investigated their relationship with spinal pain. Because there is some doubt as to whether the results of cross-sectional findings hold in longitudinal studies, a prospective study was superimposed upon a cross-sectional design of the effects of psychological variables on back pain and function to determine, whether similar results are obtained. Participants were workers randomly selected from the general population, where 372 had not experienced pain during the past year, and 209 had experienced considerable pain problems. A cross-sectional comparison of these groups using multivariate statistics indicated that the most potent risk factors were psychological distress (odds ratio=13.2) and poor function (odds ratio=6.4). Much smaller levels of risk were found for perceived workload, gender and foreign birth. Those participants with no pain were followed for one year to determine development of a spinal pain problem. Although few participants developed a significant pain problem, the prospective analyses showed that psychological distress (odds ratio=2.2), catastrophizing (odds ratio=3.0), and workload (odds ratio=2.3) produced the highest odds ratios. Taken together these results underscore the need for a multidimensional view of the development of pain disability. Moreover, individual psychological factors such as distress and catastrophizing as well as work place factors like work load were found to be highly related to the development of back pain in a sample of workers from the general population. The cross-sectional and prospective results were similar in character and demonstrate that cross-sectional studies may provide valuable information. Because psychological variables were relevant very early on, these factors may be important targets for pain prevention programs.
PubMed ID
15979015 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health inequalities by wage income in Sweden: the role of work environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51866
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(3):637-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Orjan Hemström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Equity Studies, Stockholm University/Karolinska Institute, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. orjan.hemstrom@chess.su.se
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2005 Aug;61(3):637-47
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Status Indicators
Human Engineering
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Personal Satisfaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Self Assessment (Psychology)
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
The main aim of this study was to explore the mediating role made by work environment to health inequalities by wage income in Sweden. Gender differences were also analysed. Data from the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions for the years 1998 and 1999 were analysed. Employed 20-64-year olds with a registered wage were included (nearly 6000 respondents). Sex-specific logistic regressions in relation to global self-rated health were applied. Those in the lowest income quintile had 2.4 times (men) and 4.3 times (women) higher probability of less than good health than did those in the highest quintile (adjusted for age, family status, country of birth, education level, smoking and full-time work). The mediating contribution of work environment factors to the health gradient by income was 25 per cent (men) and 29 per cent (women), respectively. This contribution was observed mainly from ergonomic and physical exposure, decision authority and skill discretion. Psychological demands did not contribute to such inequalities because mentally demanding work tasks are more common in high income as compared with low income jobs. Using sex-specific income quintiles, instead of income quintiles for the entire sample, gave very similar results. In conclusion, work environment factors can be seen as important mediators for the association between wage income and ill health in Sweden. A larger residual effect of income on health for women as compared with men suggests that one's own income from work is a more important determinant of women's than men's ill health in Sweden.
PubMed ID
15899322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Is fertility reduced among men exposed to radiofrequency fields in the Norwegian Navy?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86048
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2008 Jul;29(5):345-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Møllerløkken Ole J
Moen Bente E
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Section for, Occupational Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. ole.mollerlokken@student.uib.no
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2008 Jul;29(5):345-52
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fertility
Humans
Incidence
Infertility, Male - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Radio Waves
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
The effects of radiofrequency fields on human health are not well understood, and public concern about negative health effects has been rising. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between workers exposed to electromagnetic fields and their reproductive health. We obtained data using a questionnaire in a cross-sectional study of naval military men, response rate 63% (n = 1487). We asked the respondents about exposure, lifestyle, reproductive health, previous diseases, work and education. An expert group categorized the work categories related to electromagnetic field exposure. We categorized the work categories "tele/communication," "electronics" and "radar/sonar" as being exposed to electromagnetic fields. Logistic regression adjusted for age, ever smoked, military education, and physical exercise at work showed increased risk of infertility among tele/communication odds ratio (OR = 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.85), and radar/sonar odds ratio (OR = 2.28, 95% confidence interval 1.27-4.09). The electronics group had no increased risk. This study shows a possible relationship between exposure to radiofrequency fields during work with radiofrequency equipment and radar and reduced fertility. However, the results must be interpreted with caution.
PubMed ID
18240289 View in PubMed
Less detail

Legionella antibodies in a Danish hospital staff with known occupational exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146453
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:812829
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
M. Rudbeck
S. Viskum
K. Mølbak
S A Uldum
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology, and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, DK-2300 Copenhagen, Denmark. rudbeck@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:812829
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Biological Markers - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health status
Humans
Legionella - immunology
Legionellosis - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Personnel, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Water - analysis
Water Microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although legionnaires' disease frequently is acquired in health care institutions, little is known about the occupational risk of Legionella infection among health care workers. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to analyse antibody levels among exposed hospital workers and to determine the correlation between antibodies to Legionella and self-reported symptoms. The study included 258 hospital employees and a reference group of 708 healthy blood donors. Hospital workers had a higher prevalence of Legionella antibody titres (>/=1 : 128) than blood donors (odds ratio 3.4; 95% CI 2.4-4.8). Antibody levels were not higher among staff members at risk of frequent aerosol exposure than among less exposed employees. There was no consistent association between a history of influenza-like symptom complex and the presence of antibodies. The results indicate that hospital workers have a higher risk of Legionella infections than the general population. However, since no excess morbidity was associated with seropositivity, most Legionella infections may be asymptomatic.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20041020 View in PubMed
Less detail

Physician diagnosed asthma, respiratory symptoms, and associations with workplace tasks among radiographers in Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186115
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Apr;60(4):254-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003
Author
G M Liss
S M Tarlo
J. Doherty
J. Purdham
J. Greene
L. McCaskell
M. Kerr
Author Affiliation
Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit, University of Toronto, Canada. gary.liss@utoronto.ca
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2003 Apr;60(4):254-61
Date
Apr-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gloves, Protective
Health Surveys
Humans
Latex Hypersensitivity - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Physical Therapy Specialty
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Radiology
Risk factors
Technology, Radiologic
Abstract
Medical radiation technologists (MRTs) or radiographers have potential exposure to chemicals including sensitisers and irritants such as glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde, sulphur dioxide, and acetic acid.
To determine the prevalence of asthma and work related respiratory symptoms among MRTs compared with physiotherapists, and to identify work related factors in the darkroom environment that are associated with these outcomes.
As part of a two component study, we undertook a questionnaire mail survey of the members of the professional associations of MRTs and physiotherapists in Ontario, Canada, to ascertain the prevalence of physician diagnosed asthma, and the prevalence in the past 12 months of three or more of the nine respiratory symptoms (previously validated by Venables et al to be sensitive and specific for the presence of self reported asthma). Information on exposure factors during the past 12 months, such as ventilation conditions, processor leaks, cleanup activities, and use of personal protective equipment was also collected.
The survey response rate was 63.9% among MRTs and 63.1% among physiotherapists. Most analyses were confined to 1110 MRTs and 1523 physiotherapists who never smoked. The prevalence of new onset asthma (since starting in the profession) was greater among never smoking MRTs than physiotherapists (6.4% v 3.95%), and this differed across gender: it was 30% greater among females but fivefold greater among males. Compared with physiotherapists, the prevalence of reporting three or more respiratory symptoms, two or more work related, and three or more work related respiratory symptoms in the past 12 months was more frequent among MRTs, with odds ratios (ORs) (and 95% confidence intervals) adjusted for age, gender, and childhood asthma, of 1.9 (1.5 to 2.3), 3.7 (2.6 to 5.3), and 3.2 (2.0 to 5.0), respectively. Analyses examining latex glove use indicated that this was not likely to account for these differences. Among MRTs, respiratory symptoms were associated with a number of workplace and exposure factors likely to generate aerosol or chemical exposures such as processors not having local ventilation, adjusted OR 2.0 (1.4 to 3.0); leaking processor in which clean up was delayed, 2.4 (1.6 to 3.5); floor drain clogged, 2.0 (1.2 to 3.2); freeing a film jam, 2.9 (1.8 to 4.8); unblocking a blocked processor drain, 2.4 (1.6 to 3.7); and cleaning up processor chemical spill, 2.8 (1.9 to 4.2). These outcomes were not associated with routine tasks unlikely to generate exposures, such as working outside primary workplace, loading film into processor, routine cleaning of processors, or removing processed film. Males reported that they carried out a number of tasks potentially associated with irritant exposures more frequently than females, consistent with the marked increase in risk for new onset asthma.
These findings suggest an increase of work related asthma and respiratory symptoms shown to denote asthma among MRTs, which is consistent with previous surveys. The mechanism is not known but appears to be linked with workplace factors and may involve a role for irritant exposures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12660373 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of notched audiograms in a cross-sectional study of 12,055 railway workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269624
Source
Ear Hear. 2015 May-Jun;36(3):e86-92
Publication Type
Article
Author
Arve Lie
Marit Skogstad
Torstein Seip Johnsen
Bo Engdahl
Kristian Tambs
Source
Ear Hear. 2015 May-Jun;36(3):e86-92
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Noise, Transportation - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Railroads
Young Adult
Abstract
Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most reported occupational diseases internationally. The occurrence of audiometric notches is emphasized in both American and European guidelines for the diagnosis of NIHL. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of notched audiograms among railway personnel with and without noise exposure to better assess the usefulness of such notches in the diagnosis of NIHL.
The most recent audiogram from 1994 to 2011 of a total of 12,055 railway workers, age 20 to 65 years, was obtained from the medical records of the occupational health service of the Norwegian State Railways (NSB). The prevalences of three types of notched audiograms, Coles notch, notch index, and 4 kHz notch, were computed, in relation to age, sex, and occupational noise exposure.
Coles notch in either ear was found in 63% of the male railway maintenance workers, exposed to noise levels of 75 to 90 dB(A), compared with 53% of the non-noise exposed (
Notes
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PubMed ID
25470371 View in PubMed
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Serum levels of iron in Sør-Varanger, Northern Norway--an iron mining municipality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78678
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):432-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Broderstad Ann R
Smith-Sivertsen Tone
Dahl Inger Marie S
Ingebretsen Ole Christian
Lund Eiliv
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. Ann.Ragnhild.Broderstad@ism.uit.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):432-42
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Ferritins - blood
Humans
Iron
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance
Sex Factors
Transferrin - analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate iron status in a population with a high proportion of miners in the northernmost part of Norway. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, population-based study performed in order to investigate possible health effects of pollution in the population living on both sides of the Norwegian-Russian border. METHODS: All individuals living in the community of Sør-Varanger were invited for screening in 1994. In 2000, blood samples from 2949 participants (response rate 66.8 %), age range 30-69 years, were defrosted. S-ferritin and transferrin saturation were analysed in samples from 1548 women and 1401 men. About 30 % (n = 893) were employed in the iron mining industry, 476 of whom were miners and 417 had other tasks in the company. Type and duration of employment and time since last day of work at the company were used as indicators of exposure. RESULTS: Both s-ferritin levels and transferrin saturation were higher in men than in women. S-ferritin increased with increasing age in women, while the opposite was true for men. Iron deficiency occurred with higher frequencies in women (16 %) than in men (4 %). Iron overload was uncommon in both sexes. Adjustment for smoking and self-reported pulmonary diseases did not show any effect on iron levels. Miners had non-significant higher mean s-ferritin and transferrin saturation than non-miners. Neither duration, nor time since employment in the mine, had any impact on iron status. CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses did not show any associations between being a miner in the iron mining industry and serum iron levels compared to the general population.
PubMed ID
17319087 View in PubMed
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