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An investigation of the adjustment of retrospective noise exposure for use of hearing protection devices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144810
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2010 Apr;54(3):329-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hind Sbihi
Kay Teschke
Ying C MacNab
Hugh W Davies
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. sbhi@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2010 Apr;54(3):329-39
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Ear Protective Devices - utilization
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiologic Methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hearing Tests
Humans
Industry - statistics & numerical data
Male
Noise, Occupational - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
To account for use of hearing protection devices (HPDs) in retrospective noise exposure assessment, adjust noise exposure estimates accordingly, and validate the adjusted estimates.
A previous study in the same working population showed a stronger relation for noise and acute myocardial infarction among those who did not wear HPD. Because accurate noise exposure assessment is complicated by the use of HPD, we previously developed a multilevel model of the likelihood of HPD use for British Columbia (Canada) lumber mill workers. Historical estimates of noise exposure can be adjusted according to models predictions and a reduction in misclassifying workers, exposure is expected.
Work history and exposure information were obtained for 13,147 lumber mill workers followed from 1909 until 1998. Audiometric data for the cohort, including hearing threshold levels at several pure tone frequencies, were obtained from the local regulatory agency for the period from 1978 to 2003. Following the modeling of HPD use, noise estimates were adjusted according to models predictions and attenuation factors based on existing research and standards. Adjusted and unadjusted noise metrics were compared by investigating their ability to predict noise-induced hearing loss.
We showed a 4-fold increase in the noise exposure and hearing loss slope, after adjusting for HPD use, while controlling for gender, age, race, as well as medical and non-occupational confounding variables.
While the relative difference before and after adjustment for use of HPD is considerable, we observed a subtle absolute magnitude of the effect. Using noise-induced hearing loss as a 'gold standard' for testing the assessment of retrospective noise exposure estimates should continue to be investigated.
PubMed ID
20237208 View in PubMed
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Antineoplastic agent workplace contamination study: the Alberta Cancer Board Pharmacy perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171328
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2005 Sep;11(3):101-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2005
Author
Heidi Schulz
Susan Bigelow
Roxanne Dobish
Carole R Chambers
Author Affiliation
Cross Cancer Institute Site, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. heidis@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
J Oncol Pharm Pract. 2005 Sep;11(3):101-9
Date
Sep-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Antineoplastic Agents - analysis
Cancer Care Facilities
Cyclophosphamide - analysis
Drug Packaging
Environmental Monitoring - methods - standards
Feasibility Studies
Gloves, Protective - standards
Humans
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Pharmacies - standards
Pharmacy - standards
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
Safety Management
Abstract
To investigate the feasibility of routine monitoring for workplace antineoplastic agent contamination in the Alberta Cancer Board (ACB) pharmacy practice environment.
The ACB in the Canadian province of Alberta, which includes two public tertiary centres and 17 associated community satellite sites based around the province in existing hospitals.
Obtained organizational support and input prior to launching the feasibility study (Phase I). Samples were analysed for a common cytotoxic agent - cyclophosphamide. Surfaces chosen were within the biological safety cabinets, workplace counter tops and on external surfaces of vials provided by manufacturers. Blank samples and known contaminated controls were included in Phase I to reconfirm the methodology in a previously published study. Feasibility aspects of logistics and financial expenses were examined. A second phase (Phase II) was completed to test other areas of the pharmacy and vials, with blank samples included to reconfirm previously mentioned methodology.
The results determined that the samples tested were below acceptable detection limits with the exception of the known contaminated sample (Phase I) and exterior surfaces of vials (Phase II).
This project has increased staff awareness of the sources for antineoplastic agent workplace contamination. Some practice changes were instituted during the project itself. Logistics and expenses were realistic for routine monitoring to be adopted.
PubMed ID
16390598 View in PubMed
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Assessment of exposure to manganese in welding operations during the assembly of heavy excavation machinery accessories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196895
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2000 Oct;15(10):746-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
A. Smargiassi
M. Baldwin
S. Savard
G. Kennedy
D. Mergler
J. Zayed
Author Affiliation
Centre pour l'Etudes des Intéractions Biologiques entre la Santé et l'Environnement (CINBIOSE), University of Quebec, Montréal, Canada.
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2000 Oct;15(10):746-50
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dust - analysis
Equipment Design
Humans
Male
Manganese - analysis
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Quebec
Ventilation
Welding
Abstract
Welder exposure to metals in various industrial sectors is poorly characterized. We had the opportunity to carry out an exploratory study to characterize manganese exposure in welding operations in a recently established Quebec factory that assembled accessories for heavy excavation machinery. Ten workers were sampled for total manganese for at least two consecutive days out of three followed by two consecutive days for respirable manganese (with a size selective sampler with a median cut-off of 4 microns), during a typical week in the summer of 1998. Parts being welded were characterized as large or small. Small parts were those being welded on tables during subassembly. Workers were divided into two groups according to the parts they were welding. Seventy-eight percent of the total manganese exposure levels of welding operations during the assembly of large accessories of heavy excavation machinery exceeded the manganese American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) of 0.20 mg/m3 (GM 0.24 mg/m3, n = 14) while none exceeded the TLV during the assembly of small pieces (GM 0.06 mg/m3, n = 8). Welding operations during the assembly of large heavy excavation machinery accessories may pose a significant health hazard. Considering the importance of task-related variables affecting exposure among workers, further studies are needed to better characterize exposure determinants of welding operations during the assembly of heavy excavation machinery accessories.
PubMed ID
11036725 View in PubMed
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Bitumen, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and vehicle exhaust: exposure levels and controls among Norwegian asphalt workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190228
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2002 Jan;46(1):79-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Igor Burstyn
Britt Randem
Jan Erik Lien
Sverre Langård
Hans Kromhout
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental and Occupational Health, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, The Netherlands.
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2002 Jan;46(1):79-87
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Hydrocarbons - chemistry
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Linear Models
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Abstract
To characterize exposures of asphalt workers in Norway and to evaluate exposure control measures.
Representative asphalt paving and mixing operations were monitored in Norway in 1991-92 for exposures to bitumen fume, organic vapor, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and vehicle exhaust (NO2, CO). Linear regression was used to evaluate introduced control measures.
A total of 320 samples of airborne organic matter were gathered (279 from paving). Median personal bitumen fume measurements ranged from 0.03 to 0.15 mg/m3 and were similar in paving and asphalt mixing. According to principal component analysis, there were three independent sets of PAHs: (i) PAHs lighter than 228 g/mol; (ii) 4- to 6-ring PAHs non-detectable in 80-90% of samples; and (iii) naphthalene. Some NO2 (1/49) and CO (12/58) concentrations near paving equipment exceeded 15 min exposure limits, 2 and 25 p.p.m., respectively. Changing sampling methods midway through the study had a significant impact on the measured bitumen fume and organic vapor levels. For pavers, lower application temperatures reduced organic vapor, but not bitumen fume, exposures. Retrofitting a paving machine produced at least a 5-fold reduction in exposure to airborne organic matter. Work in tunnels increased PAH exposures, but general ventilation partially counteracted this effect.
The observed exposure levels indicate that some potentially hazardous exposures may have occurred during paving in Norway. Bitumen fume, organic vapor and PAH exposures can be reduced using appropriate engineering control measures.
PubMed ID
12005136 View in PubMed
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[Contemporary aspects of maintenance and promotion of health of the workers employed at the aluminum production enterprises].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128425
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(11):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

Determinants of use of hearing protection devices in Canadian lumber mill workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149943
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2010 Apr;54(3):319-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Hind Sbihi
Kay Teschke
Ying C MacNab
Hugh W Davies
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, 3rd Floor, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. sbihi@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2010 Apr;54(3):319-28
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiometry
British Columbia - epidemiology
Ear Protective Devices - utilization
Epidemiologic Methods
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Behavior
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Industry
Male
Models, Biological
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In a cohort study of lumber mill workers' exposure to noise and incidence of heart disease, initial noise estimates were likely overestimated because they did not account for reductions afforded by the use of hearing protection. As such information was seldom available for individual workers, modeling was necessary to predict hearing protection use and derive adjusted noise measures.
To develop a multilevel model of the likelihood of use of hearing protection devices (HPDs) for British Columbia (Canada) lumber mill workers.
The study population included 13,147 workers in 14 sawmills for whom we had information on HPD use. Subjects self-reported their use of hearing protectors during routine hearing tests over their work history period. Separate multilevel logistic regression models with increasing complexity were developed for a subcohort of workers with complete information (n = 1493) and for a subcohort comprised subjects with hearing tests coinciding with their jobs (n = 10 203). The models included random intercepts for worker and for sawmill.
HPD use was associated in both subcohorts with factors such as noise exposure and age. We also showed that specific jobs (such as sawfiling) and departments (planer, in particular) were strongly associated with the use of HPDs. The model illustrates the quantitative importance of including a hierarchical structure which allows for explaining potential sources of outcome variability.
We developed a hierarchical model to predict hearing protection use to enable correction of exposure assessments for use in retrospective epidemiological studies. We showed that this was feasible even in the absence of complete determinant information.
PubMed ID
19570944 View in PubMed
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Determinants of wood dust exposure in the Danish furniture industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187969
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2002 Nov;46(8):673-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Anders B Mikkelsen
Vivi Schlunssen
Torben Sigsgaard
Inger Schaumburg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Skive Hospital, Resenvej 25, DK-7800 Skive, Denmark. amaskive@vibamt.dk
Source
Ann Occup Hyg. 2002 Nov;46(8):673-85
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Denmark
Dust - analysis
Humans
Industry
Interior Design and Furnishings
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Risk factors
Wood
Abstract
This paper investigates the relation between wood dust exposure in the furniture industry and occupational hygiene variables. During the winter 1997-98 54 factories were visited and 2362 personal, passive inhalable dust samples were obtained; the geometric mean was 0.95 mg/m(3) and the geometric standard deviation was 2.08. In a first measuring round 1685 dust concentrations were obtained. For some of the workers repeated measurements were carried out 1 (351) and 2 weeks (326) after the first measurement. Hygiene variables like job, exhaust ventilation, cleaning procedures, etc., were documented. A multivariate analysis based on mixed effects models was used with hygiene variables being fixed effects and worker, machine, department and factory being random effects. A modified stepwise strategy of model making was adopted taking into account the hierarchically structured variables and making possible the exclusion of non-influential random as well as fixed effects. For woodworking, the following determinants of exposure increase the dust concentration: manual and automatic sanding and use of compressed air with fully automatic and semi-automatic machines and for cleaning of work pieces. Decreased dust exposure resulted from the use of compressed air with manual machines, working at fully automatic or semi-automatic machines, functioning exhaust ventilation, work on the night shift, daily cleaning of rooms, cleaning of work pieces with a brush, vacuum cleaning of machines, supplementary fresh air intake and safety representative elected within the last 2 yr. For handling and assembling, increased exposure results from work at automatic machines and presence of wood dust on the workpieces. Work on the evening shift, supplementary fresh air intake, work in a chair factory and special cleaning staff produced decreased exposure to wood dust. The implications of the results for the prevention of wood dust exposure are discussed.
PubMed ID
12406861 View in PubMed
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[Emerging issues concerning hygiene in the Russian aluminum industry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128424
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(11):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
O F Roslyi
V B Gurvich
É G Plotko
S V Kuz'min
A A Fedoruk
N A Roslaia
S V Iarushin
D V Kuz'min
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2012;(11):8-12
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - toxicity
Aluminum - analysis - toxicity
Building Codes - standards
Chemical Industry - standards
Costs and Cost Analysis
Environmental Monitoring - economics - methods
Fluorides - analysis - toxicity
Humans
Manufactured Materials - analysis - toxicity
Occupational Diseases - classification - economics - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Safety Management - organization & administration
Threshold Limit Values
Abstract
In this study the data of multiyear investigations of occupational and environmental hazards at different enterprises of the Russian aluminum industry are presented. Basing on these data, we have been elaborated the algorithm and methodological approaches on management of the occupational and ecology-related risks using hygienic safety criteria, risk evaluation technique, epidemiological and economic analysis.
PubMed ID
23479952 View in PubMed
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[Evaluating radiation dose load in medical personnel of radiologic diagnostic departments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262438
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2014;(11):21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
B V Trunov
E P Koroleva
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2014;(11):21-5
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Personnel
Humans
Moscow
Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital - standards
Occupational Exposure - analysis - prevention & control - standards
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - standards
Radiation Protection - standards
Radiology Department, Hospital - standards
Abstract
The article deals with materials on radiation hygienic evaluation of radiologic diagnostic departments in various medical institutions of Moscow. The studies covered work of medical staffers in X-ray examination and in contact with short-lived isotope generators. The authors outlined the examination types and stages with maximal radiation danger. Disimetric information obtained during the study helped to calculate values of equivalent, effective doses of radiation for medical personnel and maximal potential doses.
PubMed ID
25845145 View in PubMed
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30 records – page 1 of 3.