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137 records – page 1 of 14.

[Acute pneumonias in those working with chemical substances that irritate the respiratory tract].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227343
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(11):13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
N V Vladyko
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1991;(11):13-5
Date
1991
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Acute Disease
Chi-Square Distribution
Humans
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Pneumonia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory System - drug effects
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A study was performed of acute pneumonia (AP) morbidity among the workers exposed to respiratory irritation inducing chemical substances, which revealed a marked AP prevalence in these professional groups. A qualitative analysis of the AP cases severity helped to establish some peculiarities of the disease course in workers exposed to minor concentrations of the chemical substances, which should be taken into account in diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and out-patient observation.
PubMed ID
1839789 View in PubMed
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Age and gender differences in exposure patterns and low back pain in the MUSIC-Norrtälje study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52540
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Sep;Suppl 1:26-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999

Allergic contact dermatitis from octylisothiazolinone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112943
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2013 Jul;69(1):49-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Anja P Mose
Simon Frost
Ulf Ohlund
Klaus E Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, University of Southern Denmark, Odense C, Denmark.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 2013 Jul;69(1):49-52
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Causality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Paint - adverse effects
Patch Tests - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Thiazoles - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
Octylisothiazolinone is a biocide that has been reported as a moderate, but rare contact allergen.
To investigate the occurrence of octylisothiazolinone contact allergy and allergic contact dermatitis diagnosed and registered in the Allergen Bank at Odense University Hospital during the past 20 years. Octylisothiazolinone has been used for targeted testing only.
All octylisothiazolinone-patch test results registered in the Allergen Bank between January 1992 and February 2012 were analyzed.
A total of 20 out of 648 patients patch tested with octylisothiazolinone had positive reactions. The majority of the patients (90%) with relevant sensitizations to octylisothiazolinone had been exposed in occupational settings and most patients were painters.
Octylisothiazolinone is a relevant sensitizer.
PubMed ID
23782358 View in PubMed
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Almost half of women with malignant mesothelioma were exposed to asbestos at home through their husbands or sons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262972
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4902
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Maja Dahl Langhoff
Maren Brøndberg Kragh-Thomsen
Sharleny Stanislaus
Ulla Møller Weinreich
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4902
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asbestos - toxicity
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Pleural Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Spouses
Survival Rate
Abstract
Women often develop malignant mesothelioma (MM) without occupational asbestos exposure. Northern Jutland has a high prevalence of MM due to previously high occupational exposures to asbestos. The aim of this study was to elucidate a possible domestic exposure to asbestos through first-degree relatives in women who develop MM.
This was a retrospective study in women with MM of the pleura. A total of 30 women were diagnosed with and treated for MM in Northern Jutland from 1996 to 2012. In all, 24 women were included. Demographic data, subtype of MM, time from first hospital contact to diagnosis, survival and information on occupational and domestic exposure to asbestos were obtained from hospital records.
A total of 12.5% of the study population were primarily exposed to asbestos. 46% had domestic exposure to asbestos through their husbands or sons. The median age of the study population was 66.5 years. In all, 75% suffered from the epitheloid subtype, 12.5% from the biphasic and 8.4% from the sarcomatoid subtype. Time from first hospital contact to diagnosis was one month and the median survival time was 12 months. The 1- and 5- year-survival were 58% and 0%, respectively.
Nearly 50% of the women affected by MM have been domestically exposed to asbestos through first-degree relatives.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25186542 View in PubMed
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Animal-related occupations and the risk of leukemia, myeloma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188838
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Aug;13(6):563-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Lin Fritschi
Kenneth C Johnson
Erich V Kliewer
Rick Fry
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, 6009, Australia. linf@dph.uwa.edu.au
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Aug;13(6):563-71
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Animals
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Logistic Models
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - epidemiology - etiology
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
There is some evidence to suggest that workers in animal-related occupations are at increased risk of developing lymphohematopoietic cancers. This study aimed to examine the risk of leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and multiple myeloma associated with occupational exposure to animals.
We used data from a multi-site, population-based case-control study using mailed questionnaires which had taken place in eight of ten Canadian provinces, during 1994-1998. There were 1023 leukemia cases, 1577 NHL cases, and 324 multiple myeloma cases (all histologically confirmed) and 4688 population-based controls. Animal-related occupations were identified from a lifetime occupational history. Subjects in animal-related jobs were compared with others using logistic regression for the risk of leukemia, NHL, and multiple myeloma.
Compared to subjects without occupational exposure to animals, occupational exposure to beef cattle increased the risks of leukemia (odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.3) and NHL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9). No other animal exposure was consistently associated with risk of lymphohematopoietic cancer. An unexpected protective association was observed between work as a fisherman and leukemia (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8) and NHL (OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.4-0.9).
This population-based case-control study found that those individuals working in occupations associated with beef cattle are at increased risk for developing leukemia and lymphoma while those working in occupations requiring the handling of fish are at decreased risk of leukemia and lymphoma.
PubMed ID
12195646 View in PubMed
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Are the apparent effects of cigarette smoking on lung and bladder cancers due to uncontrolled confounding by occupational exposures?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219248
Source
Epidemiology. 1994 Jan;5(1):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
J. Siemiatycki
R. Dewar
D. Krewski
M. Désy
L. Richardson
E. Franco
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Laval-des-Rapides, Canada.
Source
Epidemiology. 1994 Jan;5(1):57-65
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Environment
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
It has been suggested that the well known associations between smoking and cancer may in part reflect inadequately controlled confounding due to occupational exposures. The purpose of the present analysis is to describe the association between cigarette smoking and both lung and bladder cancers, taking into account the potential confounding effects of over 300 covariates, most of which represent occupational exposures. A population-based case-control study was undertaken in Montreal to investigate the associations between a large variety of environmental and occupational exposures, on the one hand, and several types of cancer, on the other. Interviews were carried out with male incident cases of several sites of cancer, including 857 lung cancers and 484 bladder cancers. A group of non-smoking-related cancers, comprising 1,707 interviewed subjects, was used as one control group. Additionally, 533 population controls were interviewed and constituted a second control group. Interview information included detailed lifetime smoking histories, job histories, and other potential confounders. Each job history was reviewed by a team of experts who translated it into a history of occupational exposures. These occupational exposures, as well as nonoccupational covariates, were treated as potential confounders in the analysis of cigarette smoking effects. Regardless of whether population controls or cancer controls were used, the odds ratio (OR) between smoking and lung cancer (ranging from 12 to 16 for ever vs never smokers) was not materially affected by adjustment for occupational exposures. The odds ratios for bladder cancer (ranging from 2 to 3) were also unaffected by confounding due to occupational exposures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8117783 View in PubMed
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Asbestos exposure and survival in malignant mesothelioma: a description of 122 consecutive cases at an occupational clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120270
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;2(4):224-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
E. Skammeritz
L H Omland
J P Johansen
O. Omland
Author Affiliation
Danish Ramazzini Center, Department of Occupational Medicine, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. ellenskammeritz@gmail.com
Source
Int J Occup Environ Med. 2011 Oct;2(4):224-36
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - toxicity
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mesothelioma - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations
Pleural Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
The natural history and etiology of malignant mesothelioma (MM) is already thoroughly described in the literature, but there is still debate on prognostic factors, and details of asbestos exposure and possible context with clinical and demographic data, have not been investigated comprehensively.
Description of patients with MM, focusing on exposure, occupation, survival and prognostic factors.
Review of medical records of patients with MM from 1984 to 2010 from a Danish Occupational clinic. Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and prognostic factors were identified by Cox regression analysis.
110 (90.2%) patients were male, and 12 (9.8%) were female. The median (interquartile rang [IQR]) age was 65 (13) years. Pleural MM was seen in 101 (82.8%) patients, and peritoneal in 11 (9.0%); two (1.6%) had MM to tunica vaginalis testis, and eight (6.6%) to multiple serosal surfaces. We found 68 (55.7%) epithelial tumors, 26 (21.3%) biphasic, and 6 (4.9%) sarcomatoid. 12 (9.8%) patients received tri-modal therapy, 66 (54.1%) received one-/two-modality treatment, and 36 (29.5%) received palliative care. Asbestos exposure was confirmed in 107 (91.0%) patients, probable in four (3.3%), and unidentifiable in 11 (9.0%). The median (IQR) latency was 42 (12.5) years. Exposure predominantly occurred in shipyards. The median overall survival was 1.05 (95% CI: 0.96-1.39) years; 5-year survival was 5.0% (95% CI: 2.0%-13.0%). Female sex, good WHO performance status (PS), epithelial histology and tri-modal treatment were associated with a favorable prognosis.
MM continuously presents a difficult task diagnostically and therapeutically, and challenges occupational physicians with regard to identification and characterization of asbestos exposure.
PubMed ID
23022841 View in PubMed
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Blood markers of inflammation and coagulation and exposure to airborne particles in employees in the Stockholm underground.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159463
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Oct;65(10):655-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
C. Bigert
M. Alderling
M. Svartengren
N. Plato
U. de Faire
P. Gustavsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Karolinska Institutet, Norrbacka 4th Floor, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden. carolina.bigert@sll.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Oct;65(10):655-8
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - metabolism
Blood Coagulation Factors - metabolism
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology
Female
Humans
Interleukin-6 - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Particulate Matter - toxicity
Railroads
Sweden
Workplace
Abstract
Although associations have been found between levels of ambient airborne particles and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the general population, little is known about possible cardiovascular effects from high exposure to particles in underground railway systems. This study investigates risk markers for CVD in employees exposed to particles in the Stockholm underground system.
79 workers (54 men and 25 women) in the Stockholm underground were investigated between November 2004 and March 2005. All were non-smokers aged 25-50 years. Three exposure groups were delineated: 29 platform workers with high exposure to particles, 29 train drivers with medium exposure and 21 ticket sellers with low exposure (control group). A baseline blood sample was taken after 2 non-working days, and a second sample after 2 working days, for analysis of levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6, fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor and factor VII. The study investigated changes in plasma concentrations between sample 1 and sample 2, and differences in average concentrations between the groups.
No changes between sample 1 and 2 were found that could be attributed to particle exposure. However, the highly exposed platform workers were found to have higher plasma concentrations of PAI-1 and hs-CRP than the ticket sellers and train drivers. This suggests that particle exposure could have a long-term inflammatory effect. These differences remained for PAI-1 in the comparison between platform workers and ticket sellers after adjusting for body mass index.
Employees who were highly exposed to airborne particles in the Stockholm underground tended to have elevated levels of risk markers for CVD relative to employees with low exposure. However, the differences observed cannot definitely be linked to particle exposure as such.
PubMed ID
18178587 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer and occupational exposures in women in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201844
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
E. Weiderpass
E. Pukkala
T. Kauppinen
P. Mutanen
H. Paakkulainen
K. Vasama-Neuvonen
P. Boffetta
T. Partanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Elisabete.Weiderpass@MEP.KI.SE
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):48-53
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Occupations - classification - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Women's health
Abstract
The etiology of breast cancer is not fully understood. Environmental and occupational exposures may contribute to breast cancer risk.
We linked 324 job titles from the 1970 census of 892,591 Finnish women with incidence of breast cancer (23,638 cases) during 1971-1995. We converted job titles to 31 chemical and two ergonomic agents through a measurement-based, period-specific, national job-exposure matrix. Poisson regression models were fit to the data, with adjustment for birth cohort, follow-up period, socioeconomic status, mean number of children, mean age at first delivery, and turnover rate.
For premenopausal breast cancer, medium/high level of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation was associated with a standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.5; trend P = 0.03). For postmenopausal breast cancer, we found on SIR of 1.2 (1.1-1.3) for low level and 1.4 (1.1-1.8) for medium/high level of ionizing radiation (trend P = 0.001); and an SIR 1.3 (1.1-1.7) for medium/high levels of both asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers. Aromatic hydrocarbon solvents showed a significant trend for a modest excess of postmenopausal breast cancer.
Our study indicates that occupational exposure to ionizing radiation may be associated with an increased risk of female breast cancer. High-quality studies on environmental and occupational etiology of breast cancer are needed for further elucidation of risk factors.
PubMed ID
10361586 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer risk among relatively young women employed in solvent-using industries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20996
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
J. Hansen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. johnni@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1999 Jul;36(1):43-7
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Reproductive history
Solvents - adverse effects
Women's health
Women, Working - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the most common tumor among women, and the causes remain almost unknown apart from changes in the reproductive pattern. Based on experimental evidence, some organic solvents may have carcinogenic properties to the female breast. METHODS: We used a comprehensive national data linkage to examine the adjusted breast cancer risk among relatively young (20-55 years) Danish women employed in industries with extensive use of organic solvents (i.e., the metal product, wood and furniture, printing, chemical, and textile and clothing industries). Relative risks (OR) were estimated from a matched case-control study on 7,802 women with breast cancer (1970-1989). Potential exposure to organic solvents was accessed from the duration of employment within the selected industries and reconstructed from the files of a nationwide compulsory pension fund. Socioeconomic status and the individual reproductive pattern were obtained from the central person registry. RESULTS: The adjusted OR for breast cancer after 15 years latency was increased in each of the selected industrial groups (from 1.4 to 2.4). For the entire group with over 10 years of employment, the OR was significantly elevated (twofold). CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the observation that long-term occupational exposure to organic solvents may play a role in breast cancer risk. However, some residual confounding may exist, and further studies are required to identify specific carcinogenic organic solvents.
PubMed ID
10361585 View in PubMed
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137 records – page 1 of 14.