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[Age-dependent occupational stress in doctors of various specialties].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128351
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(4):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Iu A Parfenov
V G Belov
V S Tsoi
A A Pakhomov
G A Ryzhak
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2012;25(4):729-35
Date
2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aging - psychology
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Russia
Abstract
A comparative assessment of the extent and structure of the various forms of professional burnout among doctors-organizers as well as therapeutists and surgeons depending on age was given. It is shown that the professional burnout in doctors-organizers conjugates with a high level of emotional tension manifested in avoidance of over-saturated emotional and professional communication outside professional activities, increased irritability and temper, reluctance to exercise empathy towards colleagues and compassion for patients. The comparison of three age groups of physicians to each other in terms of the level and features of the burnout was adduced; the results demonstrate the significant differences between the age periods of 30 and 40 years and over 41 years old. Physicians in the age group of 30-40 years old are inclined to depersonalization at a relatively low level of reduction of professional achievement. It was found that age specificity of formation of the syndrome of professional burnout among surgeons was caused by the increased tendency to development of professional burnout syndrome of young and middle-aged surgeons at low levels of professional burnout among older people.
PubMed ID
23734522 View in PubMed
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[Anki gave up acute care to get perspective. Interview by Carina Roxström].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228187
Source
Vardfacket. 1990 Oct 25;14(18):8-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-25-1990

Association between occupational psychosocial factors and waist circumference is modified by diet among men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273245
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1053-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
A. Jääskeläinen
L. Kaila-Kangas
P. Leino-Arjas
M-L Lindbohm
N. Nevanperä
J. Remes
M-R Järvelin
J. Laitinen
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2015 Sep;69(9):1053-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Body mass index
Diet - adverse effects
Eating - physiology
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Food Habits - psychology
Humans
Male
Obesity - etiology
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Waist Circumference
Workload - psychology
Abstract
Occupational psychosocial stress has been identified as a risk factor for obesity, whereas dietary habits have a key role in weight control. We examined whether dietary habits modify the association between occupational psychosocial factors and waist circumference.
Data comprised 31-year-old men (n=2222) and women (n=2053) in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966. Waist circumference was measured and data on occupational psychosocial factors (demands, control and social support) and other characteristics were obtained through questionnaires. Healthy and unhealthy diet indices were constructed according to the current dietary guidelines. Associations were examined using analysis of variance adjusted for body mass index at age 14, basic education level, leisure-time physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking, stress-related eating behaviour and parity.
Among men, high job demands and high job control were associated with greater waist circumferences, and there were interactions between unhealthy diet and job demands (P=0.043) and job control (P=0.036) in relation to waist circumference. The waist of men with high demands or high control and low consumption of unhealthy foods (red/processed meat, hamburgers and pizzas, fried potatoes, sugar-sweetened soft drinks and white bread) was smaller than that of men with high demands or high control and high consumption of such foods. No associations were found among women.
A diet based on the current dietary guidelines seems to cancel out the adverse effects of occupational psychosocial factors on waist circumference among young men. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess the risks for obesity-related diseases arising from psychosocial work environments and dietary habits.
PubMed ID
25898811 View in PubMed
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[Cardiological rehabilitation--a chance of returning to work]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45603
Source
Med Pr. 2005;56(4):325-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Iwona Korzeniowska-Kubacka
Ryszard Piotrowicz
Author Affiliation
Z Kliniki i Zakladu Rehabilitacji Kardiologicznej i Elektrokardiologii Nieinwazyjnej, Instytutu Kardiologii w Warszawie. drkubacka@wp.pl
Source
Med Pr. 2005;56(4):325-7
Date
2005
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - psychology - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Bypass - psychology - rehabilitation
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
English Abstract
Heart Failure, Congestive - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Occupational Diseases - psychology - rehabilitation
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Workload
Abstract
According to the definition of the World Health Organization (WHO) "rehabilitation is a comprehensive and coordinated application of medical, social, educational and occupational measures to adapt a sick person to new life and to assist in gaining the best possible physical fitness". With respect to patients with cardiovascular diseases, the significance of comprehensive cardiologic rehabilitation is particularly emphasized. Return to work is by some authors perceived as a marker of rehabilitation efficiency. At the 8th World Rehabilitation Congress held in Dublin in May 2004, Perk (Sweden) reviewed the literature addressing the issue of returning to work. Over the recent seventy years, 460 publications devoted to this topic have been published. They mainly focus on the proportion of persons who return to work after myocardial infarction, percutaneous angioplasty of coronary arteries or implantation of aortic-coronary stents as well as on factors contributing to this success. It has been revealed that rehabilitation is one of numerous factors. Interestingly, socioeconomic and psychological, but not medical, factors play the major role in assuring return to work. There are also other factors which play a role, such as age
PubMed ID
16457371 View in PubMed
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Change from an 8-hour shift to a 12-hour shift, attitudes, sleep, sleepiness and performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72432
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998;24 Suppl 3:69-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
A. Lowden
G. Kecklund
J. Axelsson
T. Akerstedt
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Arne.Lowden@ipm.ki.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998;24 Suppl 3:69-75
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - prevention & control - psychology
Adult
Attitude
Chemical Industry
Comparative Study
Fatigue - psychology
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Reaction Time
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The present study sought to evaluate the effect of a change from a rotating 3-shift (8-hour) to a 2-shift shift (12 hour) schedule on sleep, sleepiness, performance, perceived health, and well-being. METHODS: Thirty-two shift workers at a chemical plant (control room operators) responded to a questionnaire a few months before a change was made in their shift schedule and 10 months after the change. Fourteen workers also filled out a diary, carried activity loggers, and carried out reaction-time tests (beginning and end of shift). Fourteen day workers served as a reference group for the questionnaires and 9 were intensively studied during a week with workdays and a free weekend. RESULTS: The questionnaire data showed that the shift change increased satisfaction with workhours, sleep, and time for social activities. Health, perceived accident risk, and reaction-time performance were not negatively affected. Alertness improved and subjective recovery time after night work decreased. The quick changes in the 8-hour schedule greatly increased sleep problems and fatigue. Sleepiness integrated across the entire shift cycle showed that the shift workers were less alert than the day workers, across workdays and days off (although alertness increased with the 12-hour shift). CONCLUSIONS: The change from 8-hour to 12-hour shifts was positive in most respects, possibly due to the shorter sequences of the workdays, the longer sequences of consecutive days off, the fewer types of shifts (easier planning), and the elimination of quick changes. The results may differ in groups with a higher work load.
PubMed ID
9916820 View in PubMed
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Changes in stress symptoms and their relationship to changes at work in 1981-1992 among elderly workers in municipal occupations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210015
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:36-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
P. Huuhtanen
C H Nygård
K. Tuomi
R. Martikainen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:36-48
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Mobility
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Local Government
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Physical Fitness - psychology
Stress, Psychological - complications
Work Capacity Evaluation
Workload - psychology
Abstract
This study evaluated perceived changes in stress symptoms and the relationship of these changes to work during an 11-year period.
The sample consisted of municipal workers in different occupational groups who had remained in the same occupation during 1981-1992 (N = 924, 350 men and 574 women, 14.8% of the original sample in 1981). The age range was 44-51 years in 1981. Changes in the physical and mental stress symptoms and changes at work were analyzed with the aid of a structured questionnaire in 1981 and 1992.
The questionnaire surveys revealed that stress symptoms were markedly increased, especially aches and pain in the upper and lower limbs, but also respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms. Avoidance reactions, including sense of apathy in general and desire to stay at home in the morning, were the most increased psychological symptoms. The women experienced a greater increase in symptoms than the men. Changes in symptoms were associated with changes at work in that, in general, the more symptoms had increased, the more the work had also been changed.
The results suggest that the impact of work on the functional capacity and symptoms of workers might start even earlier than the age of 45 years. This finding is of crucial importance when preventive measures and policies are being planned in regard to stress and physical and mental load at work. Results on the relationship of changes in cardiorespiratory symptoms and work tentatively suggest that, by developing job content and social support, even a positive impact on physical symptoms is possible.
PubMed ID
9247994 View in PubMed
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Constructing the program impact theory for an evidence-based work rehabilitation program for workers with low back pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182974
Source
Work. 2003;21(3):233-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Marie-José Durand
Brigitte Vachon
Patrick Loisel
Diane Berthelette
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. marie-jose.durand@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Work. 2003;21(3):233-42
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - methods
Humans
Low Back Pain - psychology - rehabilitation
Models, Theoretical
Occupational Diseases - psychology - rehabilitation
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Several low back pain work rehabilitation programs have been developed and evaluated for their outcomes. Unfortunately, the program impact theory for these programs is not described, and consequently, the exact mechanisms of action by which these programs intend to increase the probability of return to work remain unknown. This lack of knowledge jeopardizes the implementation of effective programs by health professionals and managers. The objective of this paper is to present the results of an exploratory study aimed at building the program impact theory for the PREVICAP work rehabilitation program.
The program impact theory was develop by conducting: unpublished documents and scientific literature analyses, individual and group discussions with multiple stakeholders and observation of program reality by reviewing the files of workers who completed the program.
The PREVICAP program's impact theory was elaborated based on an ecological approach to work rehabilitation. Program goals and objectives were defined for the three dimensions of the model: the worker, the work environment and the interaction between the worker and his work environment. Two program action mechanisms were defined and describe how the program was intended to achieve its expected outcomes.
This study made explicit the PREVICAP program impact theory and can help rehabilitation practitioners to address work disability according to an ecological model.
PubMed ID
14600327 View in PubMed
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Coping with traumatic stress in journalism: a critical ethnographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129992
Source
Int J Psychol. 2011 Apr 1;46(2):127-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2011
Author
Marla Buchanan
Patrice Keats
Author Affiliation
Educational and Counselling Psychology and Special Education, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. marla.buchanan@ubc.ca
Source
Int J Psychol. 2011 Apr 1;46(2):127-35
Date
Apr-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Alcoholism - psychology
Anthropology, Cultural
Canada
Defense Mechanisms
Disasters
Emotions
Exercise - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Journalism
Male
Mental Recall
Occupational Diseases - psychology
Street Drugs
Stress Disorders, Traumatic - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Wit and Humor as Topic
Abstract
Journalists who witness trauma and disaster events are at risk for physical, emotional, and psychological injury. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a critical ethnographic study among 31 Canadian journalists and photojournalists with regard to coping strategies used to buffer the effects of being exposed to trauma and disaster events and work-related stress. The findings are the result of in-depth individual interviews and six workplace observations with journalists across Canada. The most commonly reported coping strategies were: avoidance strategies at work, use of black humor, controlling one's emotions and memories, exercise and other physical activities, focusing on the technical aspects, and using substances. Recommendations for addressing the effects of work-related stress within this population are provided.
PubMed ID
22044184 View in PubMed
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Creating a critical incident stress program: a firefighter's transition from client to counselor.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143067
Source
Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2009;11(4):215-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
James Jeannette
Author Affiliation
Captain, Windsor Fire and Rescue Service Windsor, Ontario, Canada. aikican@yahoo.ca
Source
Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2009;11(4):215-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Counseling
Fear
Fires
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - psychology - therapy
Ontario
Peer Group
Rescue Work
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology - therapy
Task Performance and Analysis
Abstract
The author recounts the circumstances, beginning in the late 1980s, that lead to the creation of Windsor Fire and Rescue's (WFRS) Peer Counseling and Critical Incident Stress Team. These include his more than 20 year journey from being a firefighter in need of counseling to being asked to become WFRSS mental health professional.
PubMed ID
20524506 View in PubMed
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75 records – page 1 of 8.