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All well at work? Evaluation of workplace-based early rehabilitation in the Finnish State administration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193244
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2001 Sep;24(3):171-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
I. Väänänen-Tomppo
E. Janatuinen
R. Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
State Treasury, Helsinki, Finland. irma.vaananen-tomppo@valtiokont-tori.fi
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2001 Sep;24(3):171-80
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - mortality - rehabilitation
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Retirement - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
A comprehensive system for the early rehabilitation of personnel has been developed and practised within the Finnish State administration since 1989. The rehabilitation process can be initiated as soon as the working capacity of a person or work community is threatened but is not yet seriously impaired. Rehabilitation is principally carried out on an outpatient basis alongside ordinary work. The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcomes and processes of early rehabilitation. The research data comprised several thousands of cases and consisted of a cross-sectional and a follow-up survey and a register-based follow-up. The surveys showed that during the rehabilitation period the average performance of the participants began to match that of the better-off non-participants, especially with respect to their general working capacity, mental well-being and occurrence of musculoskeletal problems. The sense of coherence rose in both groups, which can be partly attributed to positive changes in the workplace. In the group process, there also proved to be many factors contributing to achievement of the participants' rehabilitation objectives. The register-based follow-up showed that rehabilitation had a positive effect on average longer-term morbidity. In the cases of early retirement, the average retirement age of early rehabilitation participants was considerably higher than the average for the State sector as a whole. A system of outpatient early rehabilitation, where the rehabilitation programme and the development of working circumstances progress side by side, proved to give encouraging results at very moderate cost.
PubMed ID
11560232 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of cause of death of workers of non-ferrous metal industry in the Far North]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4027
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(5):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
L V Talykova
G P Artiunina
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 1997;(5):18-21
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - mortality
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Russia
Sex Factors
Abstract
Mortality parameters among able-bodied individuals engaged into nonferrous metallurgy due to cardiovascular, respiratory diseases and malignancies several times exceed the analogous parameters among general population residing in the same climate (5.4, 4.9 and 3.6 times respectively). High mortality due to malignancies among the workers exposed to nonferrous metals does not match the data by official statistics declaring the occupational malignancies rate over 400 times lower than the mortality parameter. Such gap between actual and official statistics could result from inadequate occupational medical service for these workers.
PubMed ID
9235212 View in PubMed
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An updated study of mortality among North American synthetic rubber industry workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171887
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Dec;62(12):822-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
N. Sathiakumar
J. Graff
M. Macaluso
G. Maldonado
R. Matthews
E. Delzell
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Ryals School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA. nalini@uab.edu
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Dec;62(12):822-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Butadienes
Chemical Industry
Colorectal Neoplasms - mortality
Employment
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Leukemia - mortality
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Myeloma - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupations
Ontario - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality
Rubber
Styrene
Time Factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
This study evaluated the mortality experience of workers from the styrene-butadiene industry.
The authors added seven years of follow up to a previous investigation of mortality among 17 924 men employed in the North American synthetic rubber industry. Analyses used the standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) to compare styrene-butadiene rubber workers' cause specific mortality (1943-98) with those of the United States and the Ontario general populations.
Overall, the observed/expected numbers of deaths were 6237/7242 for all causes (SMR = 86, 95% CI 84 to 88) and 1608/1741 for all cancers combined (SMR = 92, 95% CI 88 to 97), 71/61 for leukaemia, 53/53 for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 26/27 for multiple myeloma. The 16% leukaemia increase was concentrated in hourly paid subjects with 20-29 years since hire and 10 or more years of employment in the industry (19/7.4, SMR = 258, 95% CI 156 to 403) and in subjects employed in polymerisation (18/8.8, SMR = 204, 95% CI 121 to 322), maintenance labour (15/7.4, SMR = 326, 95% CI 178 to 456), and laboratory operations (14/4.3, SMR = 326, 95% CI 178-546).
The study found that some subgroups of synthetic rubber workers had an excess of mortality from leukaemia that was not limited to a particular form of leukaemia. Uncertainty remains about the specific agent(s) that might be responsible for the observed excesses and about the role of unidentified confounding factors. The study did not find any clear relation between employment in the industry and other forms of lymphohaematopoietic cancer. Some subgroups of subjects had more than expected deaths from colorectal and prostate cancers. These increases did not appear to be related to occupational exposure in the industry.
Notes
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Comment In: Occup Environ Med. 2006 Mar;63(3):157-816497855
PubMed ID
16299089 View in PubMed
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Are manual workers at higher risk of death than non-manual employees when living in Swedish municipalities with higher income inequality?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167962
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Apr;17(2):139-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Göran Henriksson
Peter Allebeck
Gunilla Ringbäck Weitoft
Dag Thelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Göteborg University SE 405 30 Göteborg, Sweden. goran.henriksson@socmed.gu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Apr;17(2):139-44
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Censuses
Employment - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupations - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poisson Distribution
Poverty Areas
Residence Characteristics - classification
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vulnerable Populations - statistics & numerical data
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that manual workers are at higher risk of death than are non-manual employees when living in municipalities with higher income inequality.
Hierarchical regression was used for the analysis were individuals were nested within municipalities according to the 1990 Swedish census. The outcome was all-cause mortality 1992-1998. The income measure at the individual level was disposable family income weighted against composition of family; the income inequality measure used at the municipality level was the Gini coefficient.
The study population consisted of 1 578 186 people aged 40-64 years in the 1990 Swedish census, who were being reported as unskilled or skilled manual workers, lower-, intermediate-, or high-level non-manual employees.
There was no significant association between income inequality at the municipality level and risk of death, but an expected gradient with unskilled manual workers having the highest risk and high-level non-manual employees having the lowest. However, in the interaction models the relative risk (RR) of death for high-level non-manual employees was decreasing with increasing income inequality (RR = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.63-0.93), whereas the corresponding risk for unskilled manual workers increased with increasing income inequality (RR = 1.24; 95% CI, 1.06-1.46). The RRs for skilled manual, low- and medium- level non-manual employees were not significant. Controlling for income at the individual level did not substantially alter these findings, neither did potential confounders at the municipality level.
The findings suggest that there could be a differential impact from income inequality on risk of death, dependent on individuals' social position.
PubMed ID
16899476 View in PubMed
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Asbestos-associated cancers in the Ontario refinery and petrochemical sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210773
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Nov;30(5):610-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
M M Finkelstein
Author Affiliation
Ontario Ministry of Labour, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1996 Nov;30(5):610-5
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Mesothelioma - mortality
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Occupations
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Petroleum
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Asbestos has been widely used in the refinery and petrochemical sector. Mesothelioma has occurred among maintenance employees, and it was hypothesized that mesothelioma is a marker for exposures which might increase lung cancer risk. A death certificate-based case-control study of mesothelioma and lung cancer from 1980 to 1992 was conducted in an Ontario county with a substantial presence of these industries. Each of the 17 men who died of mesothelioma and 424 with lung cancer were matched with controls who died of other causes. The Job and Industry fields on the death certificates were abstracted. Employment as a maintenance worker in the refinery and petrochemical sector was associated with an increased risk of mesothelioma (odds ratio: 24.5; 90% confidence interval 3.1-102). The risk of lung cancer among petrochemical workers, in comparison with all other workers in the county, was 0.88. In an internal comparison of maintenance employees with other blue-collar workers in the refinery and petrochemical sector, the odds ratio for lung cancer was 1.73 (90% confidence interval 0.83-3.6). This finding is consistent with no difference in risk between maintenance and other employees, but it is also compatible with study power being too low to achieve statistical significance. The hypothesis of increased lung cancer risk could be examined more fully with nested case-control studies in existing cohorts. Meanwhile, it would be prudent to reinforce adherence to asbestos control measures in the refinery and petrochemical sector.
PubMed ID
8909610 View in PubMed
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Asthma mortality and occupation in Sweden 1981-1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15797
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):678-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
K. Torén
L G Hörte
Author Affiliation
Section of Occupational Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1997 Jun;31(6):678-81
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agriculture
Asthma - mortality
Automobile Driving
Beauty Culture
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to investigate mortality attributable to asthma in different occupations. The mortality from asthma among Swedish workers between 1981 and 1992 was investigated by a linkage between official mortality statistics and the occupational information in the 1980 National Census. For each occupation, a smoking-adjusted standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated. The information about smoking habits was obtained from smoking surveys carried out from 1977 to 1979. Only occupations with more than five cases were considered in the analysis. Significantly increased mortality from asthma was found among male farmers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 146; 95% confidence interval [CI] 105-187) and male professional drivers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 144, 95% CI = 101-209) and female hairdressers (smoking-adjusted SMR = 332, 95% CI = 102-525). The increased mortality among three occupational groups (hairdressers, farmers, and professional drivers) out of 46 groups analyzed may be random occurrences. However, farmers and hairdressers are exposed to agents causing asthma, indicating that the increased mortality may be attributable to occupational exposure.
PubMed ID
9131221 View in PubMed
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Breathlessness, phlegm and mortality: 26 years of follow-up in healthy middle-aged Norwegian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80737
Source
J Intern Med. 2006 Oct;260(4):332-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Stavem K.
Sandvik L.
Erikssen J.
Author Affiliation
Medical Department, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. knut.stavem@kilnmed.uio.no
Source
J Intern Med. 2006 Oct;260(4):332-42
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death
Cough - mortality - physiopathology
Dyspnea - mortality - physiopathology
Exercise - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prospective Studies
Respiration Disorders - mortality - physiopathology
Respiratory Function Tests - methods
Risk factors
Smoking - mortality
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: It is well known that pulmonary function is associated with all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) death. Less is known about the association between respiratory symptoms and mortality and whether such an association is independent of physical fitness. In this study, we assessed the association of breathlessness and productive cough with CV and all-cause mortality over 26 years. DESIGN: Prospective occupational cohort study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: In 1972-75, 1999 apparently healthy men aged 40-59 years were recruited to the study from five companies in Oslo, Norway. At study entry clinical, physiological and biochemical parameters including respiratory symptoms, spirometry, and an objective assessment of physical fitness were measured in all subjects, of whom 1,623 had acceptable spirometry. The data was analysed using Cox proportional hazards analysis, adjusting for age, lung function, physical fitness, and other possible confounders, with mortality until 2000. RESULTS: After 26 years (range 25-27), 615 men (38%) had died, of whom 308 (50%) from CV deaths. In multivariable proportional hazards models, 'having phlegm winter mornings' [hazard ratio (HR) 1.30, P = 0.01], 'breathlessness when hurrying/walking uphill' (HR 1.43, P = 0.005) and combinations of the two symptoms remained significant predictors of all-cause mortality. None of six respiratory symptoms were significant predictors of CV mortality in multivariable models. CONCLUSIONS: Phlegm, breathlessness and combinations of them were associated with all-cause mortality, even after adjusting for physical fitness, known CV and other risk factors such as smoking, and lung function. The finding of an association also after adjustment for physical fitness is new. In contrast, none of the six respiratory symptoms individually or in combination were associated with CV mortality in multivariable analysis.
PubMed ID
16961670 View in PubMed
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Cancer and non-cancer mortality of chimney sweeps in Copenhagen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27005
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1982 Dec;11(4):356-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1982
Author
E S Hansen
J H Olsen
B. Tilt
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1982 Dec;11(4):356-61
Date
Dec-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Denmark
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Occupational Diseases - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
This is a cohort study of the mortality among chimney sweeps in Copenhagen, Denmark, during 1958-77. Nearly all the chimney sweeps started in the trade around the age of 15, and so this age gives the time of first exposure to the environmental conditions of the trade. The analysis applies a continuous time model with stratification by cause of death (cancer, non-cancer), time and age, where cumulative mortality rates are derived from current mortality tables. For each stratum of interest the observed/expected mortality ratio (O/E ratio) is calculated and a test performed, based on the normal distribution. The main result is a significantly higher cancer mortality for the 40-69 year age class compared with the population at large (O/E ratio = 3.9).
PubMed ID
7152788 View in PubMed
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176 records – page 1 of 18.