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Absence of association between organic solvent exposure and risk of chronic renal failure: a nationwide population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182247
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004 Jan;15(1):180-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
C Michael Fored
Gun Nise
Elisabeth Ejerblad
Jon P Fryzek
Per Lindblad
Joseph K McLaughlin
Carl-Gustaf Elinder
Olof Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Michael.Fored@medks.ki.se
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2004 Jan;15(1):180-6
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Solvents - toxicity
Sweden
Abstract
Exposure to organic solvents has been suggested to cause or exacerbate renal disease, but methodologic concerns regarding previous studies preclude firm conclusions. We examined the role of organic solvents in a population-based case-control study of early-stage chronic renal failure (CRF). All native Swedish residents aged 18 to 74 yr, living in Sweden between May 1996 and May 1998, formed the source population. Incident cases of CRF in a pre-uremic stage (n = 926) and control subjects (n = 998), randomly selected from the study base, underwent personal interviews that included a detailed occupational history. Expert rating by a certified occupational hygienist was used to assess organic solvent exposure intensity and duration. Relative risks were estimated by odds ratios (OR) in logistic regression models, with adjustment for potentially important covariates. The overall risk for CRF among subjects ever exposed to organic solvents was virtually identical to that among never-exposed (OR, 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.81 to 1.25). No dose-response relationships were observed for lifetime cumulative solvent exposure, average dose, or exposure frequency or duration. The absence of association pertained to all subgroups of CRF: glomerulonephritis (OR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.68 to 1.34), diabetic nephropathy (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.41), renal vascular disease (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.75), and other renal CRF (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.27). The results from a nationwide, population-based study do not support the hypothesis of an adverse effect of organic solvents on CRF development, in general. Detrimental effects from subclasses of solvents or on specific renal diseases cannot be ruled out.
PubMed ID
14694171 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation of respiratory diseases among employees at a recently established refuse sorting plant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16117
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Aug 27;152(35):2485-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-27-1990
Author
T I Sigsgaard
B. Bach
E. Taudorf
P. Malmros
S. Gravesen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Socialmedicinsk Institut.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Aug 27;152(35):2485-8
Date
Aug-27-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Allergens - analysis
Asthma - etiology
Bronchitis - etiology
Denmark
Dust - adverse effects
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Refuse Disposal
Abstract
An increasing number of plants for re-use of refuse have been constructed in Denmark in recent years. The Kaastrup Plant near Skive was opened in spring 1986. The plant accepts household rubbish and industrial refuse separately. The refuse is sorted by machine (industrial refuse is sorted partially manually) and in a large partially open machine plant, refuse is converted into fuel pellets. During a period of eight months, eight out of 15 employees developed respiratory symptoms. In seven, bronchial asthma was diagnosed and chronic bronchitis in one person. Four had initial symptoms of the organic dust toxic syndrome. After further six months, another case of occupationally-conditioned asthma occurred in the plant. Only two out of nine had previously had asthma or atopic disease. The investigation did not reveal any evidence of type-I allergy. Six out of nine had specific precipitating antibodies to refuse while all had negative RAST tests to this. In spring 1989, from six to eighteen months after the onset of the symptoms, six had still dyspnoea on exertion and three had positive histamine-provocation tests and seven out of nine had left the plant. Occupational medical measurements revealed dust concentrations of 8.1 mg/cubic millimeter in September 1986 and total germs of up to 3 x 10(9) cfu/cubic meter. Construction of the plant involved considerable contact with the refuse on account of the cleansing processes and open systems and it was reconstructed in the course of 1987/1988 so that the hygienic conditions are now acceptable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2402828 View in PubMed
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Acoustics and psychosocial environment in intensive coronary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70774
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
V. Blomkvist
C A Eriksen
T. Theorell
R. Ulrich
G. Rasmanis
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. vanja.blomkvist@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Principal Component Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Speech Intelligibility
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Stress, strain, and fatigue at the workplace have previously not been studied in relation to acoustic conditions. AIMS: To examine the influence of different acoustic conditions on the work environment and the staff in a coronary critical care unit (CCU). METHOD: Psychosocial work environment data from start and end of each individual shift were obtained from three shifts (morning, afternoon, and night) for a one-week baseline period and for two four-week periods during which either sound reflecting or sound absorbing tiles were installed. RESULTS: Reverberation times and speech intelligibility improved during the study period when the ceiling tiles were changed from sound reflecting tiles to sound absorbing ones of identical appearance. Improved acoustics positively affected the work environment; the afternoon shift staff experienced significantly lower work demands and reported less pressure and strain. CONCLUSIONS: Important gains in the psychosocial work environment of healthcare can be achieved by improving room acoustics. The study points to the importance of further research on possible effects of acoustics in healthcare on staff turnover, quality of patient care, and medical errors.
PubMed ID
15723873 View in PubMed
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Acute biomechanical responses to a prolonged standing exposure in a simulated occupational setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141293
Source
Ergonomics. 2010 Sep;53(9):1117-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Erika Nelson-Wong
Samuel J Howarth
Jack P Callaghan
Author Affiliation
Regis University, Denver, Colorado, USA.
Source
Ergonomics. 2010 Sep;53(9):1117-28
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomechanical Phenomena - physiology
Electromyography - instrumentation - methods
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - etiology
Male
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Ontario
Postural Balance - physiology
Posture - physiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prolonged occupational standing has previously been associated with low back pain (LBP) development. The immediate effects of a bout of prolonged standing on subsequent functional movement performance have not been investigated. It is possible that including a period of prolonged standing may have acute, detrimental effects. The purpose of the study is to investigate the impact of a prolonged standing exposure on biomechanical profiles (trunk muscle activation, joint stiffness and kinematics) during three functional movements. A total of 23 volunteers without history of LBP performed lumbar flexion, single-leg stance and unloaded squat movements pre- and post 2 h of standing exposure. It was found that 40% of the participants developed LBP during the standing exposure. There was a decrease in vertebral joint rotation stiffness in lateral bending and increased centre of pressure excursion during unilateral stance following standing exposure. There may be adverse effects to prolonged standing if followed by activities requiring precise balance or resistance of side loads. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Prolonged standing may result in decreases in balance reactions during narrow base conditions as well as in the capacity to effectively resist side-loads at the trunk. Consideration should be given when prolonged standing is included in the workplace.
PubMed ID
20737337 View in PubMed
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[Acute local radiation lesions and their consequences (contingency in flaw inspection)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180264
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(3):40-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
N M Nadezhina
S V Filin
A V Sachkov
I A Galstian
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2004;(3):40-3
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Equipment Failure
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - etiology - surgery
Occupational Health Services - organization & administration - standards
Radiation Injuries - complications - diagnosis
Russia
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Illustrated with case history (patient F), the authors represented diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, long-term consequences of local radiation lesions.
PubMed ID
15124395 View in PubMed
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[Air humidifier disease. A problem in the graphic industry].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244497
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1981 May 4;143(19):1211-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-1981

Air pollution and lung cancer mortality in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18199
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2003
Author
Anna Bessö
Fredrik Nyberg
Göran Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.besso@imm.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2003 Nov 10;107(3):448-52
Date
Nov-10-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate the importance of exposure to ambient air pollution for lung cancer risk, we conducted a case-control study in the vicinity of a nonferrous metal smelter. The smelter started operations in 1930 and had very high emissions during the early decades, particularly of arsenic and SO(2). Among subjects deceased 1961-1990 in the municipality where the smelter is located and who had not worked at the smelter, 209 male and 107 female lung cancer cases were identified and matched by sex and year of birth to 518 and 209 controls, respectively. Information on smoking habits, occupations and residences was collected by questionnaire to next-of-kin and from registry data. Living close to the smelter was associated with a relative risk (RR) for lung cancer of 1.38 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-2.14] among men, adjusted for smoking and occupational exposures. No clear difference in risk was detected for men deceased 1961-1979 compared to men deceased 1980-1990 (RR point estimates 1.42 and 1.29, respectively). There appeared to be an increased risk especially for men exposed in the beginning of the operations (RR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.90-2.54), in particular combined with exposure duration shorter than 20 years (RR = 2.52, 95% CI 0.89-7.11). For women, however, no overall increased risk for lung cancer was observed. Although not significant, our findings thus indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among men living close to the nonferrous smelter. This increase appeared to concern primarily men exposed during the early years of operations, when emissions were very high.
PubMed ID
14506746 View in PubMed
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Alcohol, smoking, social and occupational factors in the aetiology of cancer of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239865
Source
Int J Cancer. 1984 Nov 15;34(5):603-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1984
Author
J M Elwood
J C Pearson
D H Skippen
S M Jackson
Source
Int J Cancer. 1984 Nov 15;34(5):603-12
Date
Nov-15-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
British Columbia
Dental Care
Female
Humans
Laryngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms - etiology
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Pharyngeal Neoplasms - etiology
Risk
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
A case-control study of 374 patients with primary epithelial cancers of the oral cavity, oro- and hypopharynx, and larynx is reported, the controls being patients with selected other cancers, matched for age and sex. Of all eligible patients, 93% were interviewed. Increased risks were seen with alcohol consumption and, less strongly, with smoking, which for all sites could be adequately fitted by either a multiplicative or an additive model. However, the site-specific relationships were different, alcohol consumption being significantly associated only with oral cavity, pharyngeal and extrinsic laryngeal tumours, and smoking only with intrinsic laryngeal tumours. Increased risks were associated with low socio-economic status, the unmarried state, and poor dental care. No significant associations were seen with specific occupational exposures.
PubMed ID
6500740 View in PubMed
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Ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284204
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Oct;89(7):1087-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Mai C Arlien-Søborg
Astrid S Schmedes
Z A Stokholm
M B Grynderup
J P Bonde
C S Jensen
Å M Hansen
T W Frederiksen
J. Kristiansen
K L Christensen
J M Vestergaard
S P Lund
H A Kolstad
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2016 Oct;89(7):1087-93
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Manufacturing Industry
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Occupational and residential noise exposure has been related to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alteration of serum lipid levels has been proposed as a possible causal pathway. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between ambient and at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides when accounting for well-established predictors of lipid levels.
This cross-sectional study included 424 industrial workers and 84 financial workers to obtain contrast in noise exposure levels. They provided a serum sample and wore portable dosimeters that every 5-s recorded ambient noise exposure levels during a 24-h period. We extracted measurements obtained during work and calculated the full-shift mean ambient noise level. For 331 workers who kept a diary on the use of a hearing protection device (HPD), we subtracted 10 dB from every noise recording obtained during HPD use and estimated the mean full-shift noise exposure level at the ear.
Mean ambient noise level was 79.9 dB (A) [range 55.0-98.9] and the mean estimated level at the ear 77.8 dB (A) [range 55.0-94.2]. Ambient and at-the-ear noise levels were strongly associated with increasing levels of triglycerides, cholesterol-HDL ratio, and decreasing levels of HDL-cholesterol, but only in unadjusted analyses that did not account for HPD use and other risk factors.
No associations between ambient or at-the-ear occupational noise exposure and serum lipid levels were observed. This indicates that a causal pathway between occupational and residential noise exposure and cardiovascular disease does not include alteration of lipid levels.
PubMed ID
27319006 View in PubMed
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Annual decline in forced expiratory volume is steeper in aluminum potroom workers than in workers without exposure to potroom fumes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278343
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2016 Apr;59(4):322-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Vidar Søyseth
Paul K Henneberger
Gunnar Einvik
Mohammed Abbas Virji
Berit Bakke
Johny Kongerud
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2016 Apr;59(4):322-9
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Aluminum
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Diseases - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Prospective Studies
Spirometry
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
Aluminum potroom exposure is associated with increased mortality of COPD but the association between potroom exposure and annual decline in lung function is unknown. We have measured lung volumes annually using spirometry from 1986 to 1996. The objective was to compare annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1?s (dFEV1) and forced vital capacity (dFVC).
The number of aluminum potroom workers was 4,546 (81% males) and the number of workers in the reference group was 651 (76% males). The number of spirometries in the index group and the references were 24,060 and 2,243, respectively.
After adjustment for confounders, the difference in dFEV1 and dFVC between the index and reference groups were 13.5 (P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
26853811 View in PubMed
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410 records – page 1 of 41.