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74 records – page 1 of 8.

Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Dec;10(6 Spec No):511-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
M. Olkinuora
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1984 Dec;10(6 Spec No):511-5
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - mortality
Male
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupations
Risk
Social Class
United States
Abstract
Occupational roles are a dominant force in many aspects of social life. Occupation signifies a complex of social and psychological factors that reflect intelligence, education, personality, ambition, social status, and life-style. The consumption of alcohol and alcoholism have many correlations with occupational roles. Mortality from cirrhosis of the liver reflects the per capita consumption of alcohol. In certain occupations such mortality rates are clearly above average. The highest risk is found in occupations associated with the serving of food and beverages. A Finnish study has shown that the alcohol-related use of health services among males is the highest among unskilled workers, painters, seamen, and construction workers and the lowest among executives and farmers. Many population studies have shown that blue-collar workers and laborers have the highest level of drinking. This pattern is not necessarily true among females. The risk factors associated with occupation include the availability of alcohol at work, social pressure to drink on the job, separation from normal social relationships, and freedom from supervision. The opportunity to obtain alcoholic beverages relatively inexpensively, when combined with social pressure by peers to drink heavily, is an especially powerful explanation for high rates of alcoholism within an occupation.
PubMed ID
6535254 View in PubMed
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Analysis of fatalities and injuries involving mining equipment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161185
Source
J Safety Res. 2007;38(4):461-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
W A Groves
V J Kecojevic
D. Komljenovic
Author Affiliation
The Pennsylvania State University, Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, 110 Hosler Building, University Park, PA 16802-5000, USA. wag10@psu.edu
Source
J Safety Res. 2007;38(4):461-70
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Health
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Despite significant reductions, the number of injuries and fatalities in mining remains high. A persistent area of concern continues to be equipment-related incidents.
Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) and Current Population Survey (CPS) data were used to examine equipment-related injuries over the period 1995-2004. Incidents were reviewed to determine which types of mining equipment were most often involved and to identify and characterize trends.
Non-powered hand tools was the equipment category most often involved with non-fatal injuries while off-road ore haulage was the most common source of fatalities.
Younger employees had an elevated risk of injury while workers >55 years had an elevated risk for fatality. A large majority of incidents involve workers with
PubMed ID
17884433 View in PubMed
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An historical prospective mortality study of the Sarnia Division of Dow Chemical Canada Inc., Sarnia, Ontario (1950-1984).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229906
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Nov-Dec;80(6):441-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
R D Egedahl
G W Olsen
E. Coppock
M L Young
I M Arnold
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Nov-Dec;80(6):441-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cause of Death
Chemical Industry
Healthy Worker Effect
Humans
Information Systems
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Abstract
We examined the mortality experience of 3,479 male Dow Canada employees who were employed at Sarnia Division for at least 12 continuous months during the years 1945 through 1983, utilizing the Canadian Mortality Data Base maintained by Statistics Canada, covering 1950-1984. We analyzed cause-specific mortality using male, age and calendar-year-adjusted death rates for Canada and Ontario. Total mortality was significantly below expectation whether the entire follow-up period (240 observed vs. 366.9 expected) or a 15-year latency period (171 observed vs. 290.4 expected) was considered. Statistically significant fewer observed deaths were found for all respiratory cancer, cancer of the bronchus and lung, circulatory disease, ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, digestive disease, cirrhosis and other liver disease and deaths due to accidents, poisonings and violence. The observation of three deaths due to mesothelioma, a rare cancer often associated with asbestos exposure, was a significant finding as was a statistically significant elevation of observed deaths in the category "other forms of heart disease".
PubMed ID
2611743 View in PubMed
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Asbestos-associated deaths among insulation workers in the United States and Canada, 1967-1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225187
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:1-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-31-1991
Author
I J Selikoff
H. Seidman
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai School of Medicine, City University of New York, New York 10029-6574.
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1991 Dec 31;643:1-14
Date
Dec-31-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asbestosis - epidemiology - mortality
Canada
Cause of Death
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
United States
PubMed ID
1809121 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among male salaried employees at a smeltery in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24177
Source
Acta Oncol. 1993;32(1):9-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
A. Sandström
S. Wall
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Care Research, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1993;32(1):9-14
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arsenic - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Copper
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This study focuses on mortality and cancer incidence among the male salaried employees at a copper smeltery in northern Sweden, where previously an increased lung cancer risk had been demonstrated among blue-collar workers, with all likelihood due to arsenic exposure. During the period 1928-1979 there has been 1,255 male salaried employees and 6,334 male blue-collar workers. Three cohorts were formed; those who had worked only as salaried employees, those who had worked only as blue-collar workers and those had worked in both job categories. The mortality among the entire group of salaried employees was comparatively lower than that of Sweden as a whole. The incidence of lung cancer was highest among those who had worked in both job categories, most of them former blue-collar workers. The trends in lung cancer incidence among the blue-collar workers along and among those who had had both types of jobs showed the same pattern, with a peak in the 1970s. The decrease in this trend started earlier among the salaried employees. When job category and employment cohort were analyzed together the highest risk was confirmed for those having been employed in both job categories.
PubMed ID
8466772 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and mortality among Swedish leather tanners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23587
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1994 Aug;51(8):530-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
Z. Mikoczy
A. Schütz
L. Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Occup Environ Med. 1994 Aug;51(8):530-5
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tanning
Abstract
OBJECTIVES--The aim was to study the incidence of cancer among Swedish leather tanners. METHODS--A cohort of 2026 subjects who had been employed for at least one year between 1900 and 1989 in three Swedish leather tanneries, was established. The cancer incidence and mortality patterns were assessed for the periods 1958-89 and 1952-89 respectively, and cause-specific standardised incidence and mortality ratios (SIRs and SMRs) were calculated. RESULTS--A significantly increased incidence of soft tissue sarcomas (SIR 4.27, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.39-9.97) was found, based on five cases. Excesses, (not statistically significant) was also found for multiple myelomas (SIR 2.54, 95% CI 0.93-5.53), and sinonasal cancer (SIR 3.77, 95% CI 0.46-13.6). CONCLUSIONS--The increased incidence of soft tissue sarcomas adds support to previous findings of an excess mortality in this diagnosis among leather tanners. A plausible cause is exposure to chlorophenols, which had occurred in all three plants. The excess of multiple myelomas may also be associated with exposure to chlorophenol. The association between incidence of cancer and specific chemical exposure will be elucidated in a cohort-based case-referent study.
PubMed ID
7951777 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence and mortality in a Swedish rubber tire manufacturing plant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87623
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2007 Dec;50(12):901-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Wingren Gun
Axelson Olav
Author Affiliation
Divison of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. gunwi@imk.liu.se
Source
Am J Ind Med. 2007 Dec;50(12):901-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Manufactured Materials - toxicity
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Occupational Health
Petroleum - toxicity
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Risk factors
Rubber - toxicity
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A classification of 12 work categories was used to evaluate the cancer incidence and mortality among a cohort of Swedish rubber tire workers. METHODS: Cancer incidence and mortality in the cohort was compared with expected values from national rates. Standardized incidence and mortality ratios were calculated for the total cohort, for sub-cohorts and with the inclusion of a latency requirement. RESULTS: Among men, increased incidence and mortality risks were found for cancer in the larynx; SIR=2.10; 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 1.05-3.76, SMR=2.08; 95% CI: 0.42-6.09. Increased risks were also seen for cancer in the trachea, bronchus, and lung; SIR=1.62; 95% CI: 1.28-2.02, SMR=1.54; 95% CI: 1.21-1.94, the incidence risk was highest among those with the longest exposure duration and among workers in compounding/mixing, milling, and maintenance. Decreased incidence risks were seen for cancer of the prostate (SIR=0.74; 95% CI: 059-0.92) and skin (SIR=0.57; 95% CI: 0.36-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: The finding of an excess of tumors in the respiratory system is in agreement with earlier findings in other studies on rubber tire workers. The results on other cancer types are compared to earlier findings and related to work processes and chemical exposures of possible causal importance.
PubMed ID
17972254 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and mortality in relation to occupation in 700,000 members of the Canadian labour force.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246315
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1980;3(2):487-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
G R Howe
J. Lindsay
A B Miller
Source
Cancer Detect Prev. 1980;3(2):487-97
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Computers
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Probability
Registries
Risk
Sampling Studies
Smoking
Abstract
The mortality and cancer incidence experience of a 10% sample of the Canadian labour force has been monitored by using computerized record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality and Cancer Incidence Data Bases. Occupation and industry data are available for the sample for the years 1965-1971, and the data are being used both to generate and test hypotheses concerning occupational exposures and increased risk of various cancers. It is planned to continue the monitoring process in future years, and as the number of cancer cases and deaths in the cohort accumulate, the data will provide an increasingly valuable utility for cancer researchers.
PubMed ID
7337923 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence and mortality in the Swedish polyurethane foam manufacturing industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24021
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Jun;50(6):537-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
L. Hagmar
H. Welinder
Z. Mikoczy
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1993 Jun;50(6):537-43
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Chemical Industry
Cohort Studies
Cyanates - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Isocyanates
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Toluene 2,4-Diisocyanate - adverse effects
Abstract
Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) and methylene diphenyldiisocyanate (MDI) are used in large quantities in the polyurethane foam manufacturing industry. Both substances are mutagenic and at least TDI is carcinogenic to animals, but the occupational hazard with respect to cancer is not known. Cancer incidence and mortality patterns were therefore investigated in a cohort of 4154 workers from nine Swedish plants manufacturing polyurethane foam, employed for at least one year. Each workplace and job task in the nine plants was categorically assessed for each calendar year by an experienced occupational hygienist, for "no exposure", "low or intermittent exposure", or "apparent exposure" to TDI and MDI. The observed deficit for all cause mortality (standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 0.78, (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.66-0.93) became smaller (SMR 0.92) excluding the first 10 years since the start of exposure and was ascribed to a healthy worker effect. No increased risk for death from bronchial obstructive diseases was found. An almost statistically significant deficit occurred for all malignant neoplasms (standardised incidence ratio (SIR) 0.81, 95% CI 0.63-1.02); slight (not significant) increased risks were found for rectal cancer (SIR 1.66) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR 1.53). The SIR for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma increased to 2.80 (95% CI 0.76-7.16) when the first 10 years since first exposure were excluded from the observation period. The corresponding figure for rectal cancer was 1.92 (95% CI 0.52-4.92). Further restricting the analysis to those who had experienced an apparent exposure to TDI or MDI increased the SIR for both rectal cancer (3.19, 95% CI 0.66-9.33), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (3.03, 95% CI 0.37-10.9). These estimates were based, however, on few incident cases. As the cohort is still young and little time has elapsed since the start of exposure, future follow ups will enable a more conclusive evaluation.
PubMed ID
8392362 View in PubMed
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Cancer morbidity in Swedish shipyard workers 1978-1983.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26197
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1987;59(5):455-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Sandén
B. Järvholm
Author Affiliation
Götaverken Företagshälsovård AB, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1987;59(5):455-62
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Asbestos - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - radiography
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - mortality - radiography
Pleura - radiography
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ships
Sweden
Abstract
The cancer morbidity in 3787 shipyard workers was studied between 1978 and 1983. In these shipyards the use of asbestos was abandoned in 1972. The overall cancer morbidity was found to be similar to that of the male population of the same city, but there were four cases of mesothelioma. There were 11 cases of lung cancer, as opposed to 9.8 expected cases. Men with both heavy and long exposure to asbestos had no increased risk of lung cancer. The occurrence of pleural plaques was not associated with the risk of developing cancer.
Notes
Erratum In: Int Arch Occup Environ Health 1987;59(6):623
PubMed ID
3653990 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.